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  • anonymoose

    温馨提示

    By anonymoose

    这张照片是在哪里拍的?
    • 0 comments
    • 606 views
  • js6426

    Week 15 - 城堡!

    By js6426

    This week was a standard week with not much to say.  I don't really want to write posts just for the sake of writing them, so I think this will be my last post until we start our finals, which is 3 weeks from now.  Then I will do a post to finish the semester, including areas I feel I have grown in, and areas that need the most improvement.  Perhaps also some goals for the break.  I will then do a post after my finals, and maybe a mid-break post to try and keep myself working!    The t
    • 1 comment
    • 748 views
  • roddy

    Signese Revival 42

    By roddy

    One fairly random photo of Chinese characters in action, per week, until sometime in 2018. And perhaps longer if I'm encouraged. Those who want to contribute their own random photos of Chinese characters are welcome, just get in touch and I'll add you to the contributor list so you can post directly, from computer or phone.   Can't imagine it happens anywhere mean as much now, but calling cards used to be enormous business.
    • 0 comments
    • 492 views
  • abcdefg

    Top 12 dim sum

    By abcdefg

    Here's another dim sum menu, sort of. This one is especially useful because it features only 12 items from a busy upstairs restaurant that offers probably a hundred items. (I ate upstairs.) These take away selections are available for purchase on the street level; no need to go inside. My guess is they are some of the house's best sellers. This place was across the street from my Hong Kong (Wan Chai) hotel 華美粵海酒店。         If you figure out and learn these 12 items,
    • 0 comments
    • 1,130 views
  • DrWatson

    Handwritten Signs at the Market

    By DrWatson

    Longan's for sale at a shop in New York City's Flushing Chinatown.
    • 0 comments
    • 896 views

Our community blogs

  1. feihong
    Latest Entry

    By feihong,

    blogentry-38695-0-91172300-1316373677_thumb.png

    Point out the errors in the translation.

    Mark: AWESOME night. Dry spell = broken.

    Mark:这天棒透了。干旱期结束了。

    Karen likes this.

    Karen觉得这挺赞的。

    Mark: MOM WTF

    Mark:娘你发疯了吗

    Karen: Oops. How do I unclick?

    Karen:是故意的。玩得很开心吗?

    Melissa: HAHAHAHAHAHA

    Melissa:呼呼呼呼呼呼

    Source: Awkward Moments in Facebook Likes

  2. mungouk
    Latest Entry

    By mungouk,

    178441574_10164979544795234_4627536548492951317_n.thumb.jpg.defb5cb3cc684b430c3b4cbd8f4f503d.jpg

     

    天边的额吉 seems like a really odd name for a brand, possibly something to do with the Mongolian connection...?

     

    Anyone know the story behind this?

  3. This was copied from the conclusion of a research paper I wrote. I'm not super confident on the quality of the paper so I'm not putting it here. A lot of this should be "no shit" to many of you. Some of it might be surprising.

    A teacher’s ability to naturally gravitate toward good pedagogy depends on target language proficiency, linguistic expertise, and familiarity with current research and technology. Based on the studies referenced in this paper and the discussion in the previous section,

    • Reading complements writing and writing complements reading. They should be developed together, with reading prioritized.
    • Students should not be expected to write whatever they can say or read, but should be expected to write something in order to develop sensitivity to orthographic features of Chinese.
    • Students should be shown and be allowed to use the best learning tools available on their various devices.
    • Allowing novice students to produce written Chinese using phonetic input methods is not a handicap, but a scaffolding tool providing reinforcement of the connection between phonetic notation, meaning, and written representation of words.
    • Learners who are freed from having to handwrite everything in their oral vocabulary should learn handwriting at a more deliberate pace, where more attention is paid to form.
    • In particular, the modular structure of Chinese characters should be taught explicitly.
    • Although unfashionable, rote repetition is still useful in developing motor memory, which automatizes encoding, allowing a focus on meaning.
    • The same stroke order should be followed each time a character is written.

  4. bijian's Blog

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    Recent Entries

    昨天和今天,我花好几个小时看一篇文章在这个URI: http://business.sohu.com/20100730/n273866891.shtml

    我为什么选择“北京人大常委会建言:对流动人口采取新户籍模式”的文章吗?就是因为二零零七年在北京的时候,一个中国朋友叫我周末的时候去教英文。我同意了,然后找到学生们是流动人口的孩子们。这些孩子給我留下很好的印象所以想看到这篇文章对他们的情况说什么。

    北京人大常委会建言:对流动人口采取新户籍模式 - 2010年07月30日07:17 - 来源:新华网

      北京市人大常委会就“十二五”规划建言 对流动人口采取新户籍管理模式

      针对制定北京市国民经济和社会发展“十二五”规划,昨天的北京市人大常委会第十九次会议上,市人大常委会盯紧建设科技创新中心、建设服务业中心、建设宜居城市、加快农村城镇化、合理调控城市人口规模等五大问题,提出了一揽子建议。

    我认为上面的意思是在北京从现在到五年以后人们要不但建设很多东西,而且急步农村。加油!

      “房地分离”经适房面向全体城镇居民

      市人大常委会建议,市政府进一步改进和规范经济适用房在规划、建设、出售、使用、回购及监管等方面的制度,确保其社会保障的性质和功能。在此基础上,研究采取“房地分离”的经济适用住房建管新模式,即购房人只享有房屋所有权,不享有土地收益、处置权。在价格构成上,购房人只承担房屋的基本建安费用、相应的配套设施费用和税费,与政府按照一定比例共有产权。

      出售时购房人与政府按产权比例进行收益分配。在适用对象上,应该是面向所有的城镇居民,首次购房的居民都可以根据自己的意愿和实际需要,购买一套能够满足基本生活需求、标准化配置的住宅,做到公平普惠。这种模式,有利于解决以往经济适用住房与市场不接轨、“有限产权”界定难、退出机制难以操作等弊端,还可以大大降低监管成本。

    是不是政府不想人们在比较底的价买房子格然后在比较高的价格卖这个房子?华盛顿和美国的别的市政府也有差不多一样的政策,就是买房子以后得等两年才可以卖房子,要不然得付比较大的税费。对不对?

      符合条件流动人口采用新户籍管理模式

      市人大常委会建议,在合理调控城市人口规模的基础上,加强对流动人口合法权益的保护。要加强对流动人口结构的分析研究,对那些已经在京拥有合法所有权住房、具有稳定职业和收入、连续居住并缴纳社会保险金达到一定年限,符合一定条件的流动人口,研究采取新的户籍管理模式,让他们更快、更好地融入北京。

    如果人们已经在北京有工作,有房子,那这个节目要“让他们更快、更好地融入北”。

      农村城镇化要“一变四有三进”

      市人大常委会建议,要充分发挥农民在农村城镇化中的主体作用,切实保护农民的合法权益,努力实现农村城镇化进程中“一变四有三进”,即:随着农民集体土地性质功能的变化,使农民有住房、有新型产业、有稳定就业、有新型经济组织的股权,进入与城市衔接的社会保障体系、进入均等化的基本公共服务覆盖范围、进入股份合作制的新型经济组织。记者 王皓 实习生 王颜欣 (来源:北京日报)

    (责任编辑:李瑞)

    文章来源:http://business.sohu.com/20100730/n273866891.shtml (责任编辑:李瑞)

    人们想让农民什么时候都有房子和工作。

    请您让我知道我的错误。谢谢大家。

    ---

    九月二十一号2010-很感谢Zomac,geesisy,和Archie.,因为您们改了好几个错误

  5. jbradfor
    Latest Entry

    Just a warning, in case all of the "女" confuses you into thinking that a "女婿" is female. I assumed it was, and boy did I get the wrong impression of that relationship!

    "姪女婿" is male too. Just saying.

  6. n./adj. 直观

    This word means intuitive, audio-visual, visual, i.e. something that is directly perceived through the senses.

    直观教具

    aids to object teaching; audio-visual aids

    直观教学

    object teaching

    On the upside, I found working with the Facelets API to be very natural and intuitive.

    在有利方面来说,我发现使用Facelets API非常自然和直观

    The touch-key designed accords with the trend of the products, and operate the products more easily.

    符合产品潮流的触摸按键设计,更直观轻易操作产品

    For an interesting take on intuitive English vocabulary learning, check out: http://pic.daqi.com/slide/2934663.html

    What do you think?

  7. Chinoiseries Etc.

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    No blog entries yet

  8. Forums Affairs

    • 2
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    Recent Entries

    It's way too early to tell what if any impact the change in software will have on site usage. But lets look at some numbers anyway.

    First off, early indications are that everyone has figured out how to post - new posts figures for the last couple of days are broadly in line with the same days last week. Subtract all the posts made in the topic about the move (which don't really count as normal posting) and you've got figures down a bit, but not to a worrying extent.

    There are page redirects in place to bring anyone attempting to visit old forum content pages to the right place on the new system, so search engine traffic is still finding us. It has dropped by about 10% on the same day last week, presumably as Google and the rest update the index with the new urls. That kind of drop is well within the realms of random Internet fluctuations anyway.

    Talking of Google, the changes have certainly been noticed - there's a clear spike in indexing as the new pages are visited to check what if anything has changed. blogentry-3-12735792029_thumb.png

    And it's maybe a bit early, but it looks like Googlebot is finding the new pages easier to eat - this shows how long on average it takes to download a page. There's not a lot of value in that information, but it indicates that the new scripts are at least not running any slower than the old ones.

    blogentry-3-127357919233_thumb.png

    And if anyone wants to do their bit to boost the stats - get posting. Posts generate more posts, and more visitors.

  9. I take the Shanghai metro a lot. While on the subway they have different TV programs, at the moment usually just the recap of the Shanghai expo of the previous day. On the weekend though I have found they have a program I like to call "Shanghai's most devious Criminals" blogentry-9471-127686048303_thumb.jpg

    The show features a police man and actual CCTV footage of criminals stealing or doing some sort of con. The con in the picture is an old man crossing the street and making an expensive car slowly bump into his partner in crime a bicycle that just happens to be riding next to the car in the blind spot when the old guy walks towards the car. The bicyclist falls down and asks for compensation. The policeman is eventually called and after reviewing the tapes and seeing how these two scam artists worked arrested them for the scam. There was another one 2 weeks ago which had the cop chasing the criminal who ran across a wide 3 lane road and climbed over the median. He was about to get away when a pedestrian saw the cop chasing him, ran after the criminal and tackled him to the crowd, putting the criminal in a headlock until the police could catch up and put the cuffs on him. For a public documentary show it had a bunch of action and a little uneditted violence.

    Anyway this use of the Metro TV is quite interesting I thought, it was half instructional on how to spot scams and half (look how we're catching criminals, don't think about trying anything as we have cameras everywhere.)

    Much better than the red light -green light of how to get on the subway movies and how not to go after your cell phone after you drop it on the tracks.

    Have fun,

    Simon:)

  10. Beijing Bicycle

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    Recent Entries

    I pity the fool who can't shake the evil bean. (Not really, I just wanted to use Mr. T's famous "I pity the fool" line.)

    Living on the Big Island of Hawaii for 7 years turned me into a coffee snob. I grew to like the strong, bitter taste of Kona coffee and the coffee my friend grew on the Hamakua coast. During my 3 years in Japan I frequented two small cafes in Gifu City that served strong coffee and sweet cake, and played good, old-school jazz. I never got hooked on Japanese green or barley tea. Japanese green tea is good, but I prefer green tea ice cream and green tea chocolate to drinking it.

    So when I moved to China last year I was hoping to maintain the coffee buzz. Not sure what happened. A few lukewarm cans of Nescafe and a few mediocre mocha's at some cafes and I just wasn't feeling the buzz anymore. So I gradually switched over to tea.

    Flashback: The best cup of tea I've ever had in China (or anywhere else for that matter) was in a small town called Xiahe(夏河) in Gansu province. It was in a small ramen shop. The young waiter reached into a bag, pulled out a handful of tea leaves that were so dark green they almost looked black, threw them into a drinking glass (not a tea mug) and then poured hot water over them. The tea had a strong, smoky taste but it was also very smooth. I've been trying to "find" that taste ever since (about two years ago). I got a hint of it in a small ramen shop in Miyun (密云) two months ago. It wasn't as strong, but a hint of the smoky taste was definitely there. I asked the waiter what kind of tea it was and he said it was Oolong. A few weeks later I went to a couple of tea shops and tried to explain the flavor of tea I was looking for, but I still haven't found it. Maybe a trip back to 夏河 is in order. Next time I'm going to take some of the tea leaves with me.

    So I bought a tea set the other day. And so far, my male ego is taking it in strides. I'm thinking I need some dolls and stuffed animals for a tea party. While she said it looks nice, my wife doesn't share my enthusiasm for tea. She likes fruit juice and milk. I'd like to bring this point up the next time a language teacher throws me a "Chinese people like tea, Americans like coffee" generalization.

    I'd like to study the art of making tea. For me, it's about more than just drinking a beverage. It's like a mini ritual. It's about taking time out, sitting quietly, drinking something that tastes good and relaxes me.

    I'm digging Jasmine tea. I'm hoping to switch to some green tea as the Summer heats up.

    What kind of tea do you like?

  11. abcdefg
    Latest Entry

    I've been traveling again. Here's a sign above a urinal in Kunming Airport.

    blogentry-20301-061432100 1312591563_thumb.jpg

  12. keitha's Blog

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    Recent Entries

    I've been here in Beijing at Beihang University for a week now. The lectures starts on tuesday so I have had some time to explore the surrounding area and check out some markets. So far it has been a great experience and from a swedes point of view the chinese are very friendly and open for contact. I wish I had some language skills to be able to chat with people but that will change (hopefully!).

    Some photos : http://www.flickr.com//photos/keithakid/sets/72157627476683131/show/

  13. Hello everyone,

    It has been a while since I last updated my blog. There were a couple of reasons for this - My eyes:shock:

     

    My vision was deteriorating quite a lot and last November the decision was taken to under go cataract surgery. As this was in the UK and on the NHS the wheels grind (no complaints it just the way it is) and eventually I now have 2 new lenses and can see better than I have been able to for many years. I found it was becoming increasingly frustrating trying to read characters with bad eyes and magnifying glasses are a pain, hard to scan pages with one.

     

    I am still in recovery, it is only the third day after my second eye so slowly slowly does it. 

     

    My intention is to return and update my blog with my new learning schedule and updates as to my successes and failures and hopefully help myself and others to progress with learning Chinese.

     

    Just wanted to update anyone who was interested that my hiatus from learning is now turning slowly into a return to learning.

  14. navaburo
    Latest Entry

    I have had trouble with the trio of traditional characters which simplify to 干. It turns out (as usual) that all three have curious and twisted etymologies. Here are some mnemonics for keeping the traditional characters 幹干and 乾 straight in your head:

    乾gan1

    This is the most straight-forward of the trio.

    It means "dry":

    乾果

    dried fruit

    乾淨

    clean

    In its qian2 pronunciation, it is also one of the Eight Trigrams, and a surname, but those are much lower frequency uses.

    Mnemonic: When there is a drought you beg for even a little mist.

    Etymological note:

    Wieger clarifies that "dry" was originally written using 旱 on the left (with 十 above it?). The character 乾 originally was read qian2 and represented the sun shining into the jungle, dislodging vapors which then rise up into the sky.

    幹gan4

    This character can mean "to do" or "tree trunk".

    It can be used alone:

    你幹了一件蠢事。

    You have committed ("done") a folly.

    Or in the common idiom gan4ma5:

    你幹嘛/ 你幹甚麼?

    What are you doing?

    A canonical example of the "tree trunk" meaning is:

    樹幹

    shu1gan4

    tree trunk

    Mnemonic:

    A tree (which originally was made of wood but is now a post-modern clothes hanger pole) is topped with an umbrella of leaves. But, through the mist, you can only see the trunk.

    Etymonlogical note:

    Wieger says the 干 component in 幹 is supposed to be 木, the former being an "absurd phonetic redundancy" This would make more sense.

    干gan1

    This is the odd-ball in the group. It has several meanings. Its most prolific meaning is "to offend":

    干犯

    gan1fan4

    to offend or to violate

    干涉

    gan1she4

    to meddle

    But this gan can also mean "stem" in:

    天干

    the Ten Heavenly Stems

    An archaic meaning is "shield":

    干戈

    gan1ge1

    weapons of war, literally "shield and spear"

    Mnemonic:

    In Toronto, up until a couple of years ago, it was illegal to hang clothes outside, i.e. one of the biggest offenses and ways to offend the sensibilities of people was to hang your clothes outdoors. Silly, but unfortunately true. (credit: koohii user vorpal)

    Etymological note:

    Wieger tells us that 干 represents a pestle. By extension it means to grind or destroy. Destruction in the moral sense gives offense. Destruction in the martial sense gives the warlike association in 干戈.

  15. Have almost finished translating the song 纯真年代 so will post that up when done, but to take a break and try translating some smaller passages I'm going to copy some sample sentences from NCIKU.com's dictionary. Here is the first one I tried with my translation underneath:

    A: 回忆起过去那如火如荼的革命岁月,他激动不已。

    B: 岁月漫长,世事如白云苍狗

    A: Remembering the rapidly growing revolutionary years, he is endlessly excited

    B: The years are endless, world affairs are like white clouds and dark green dogs

    • 回忆起过去

    "memories form and pass by".

    I thought remembering or as he remembered would be an appropriate translation but I am unsure.

    • 那如火如荼的革命岁月

    "That like fire like bitter herb revolution years".

    This really confused me when I broke it down as I didn't know how to combine the 如火如荼 part. The dictionary said it was a saying meaning either "magnificent" or "originally used to describe a soldier's demeanor and discipline; developing quickly; growing rapidly;blazing", so I opted for rapidly growing as seems more appropriate to describe a revolution.

    • 他激动不已

    "He excited endlessly".

    I thought this would sound better as "His excitement is endless" but that would need 的, and the translation that I have for 不已 is endlessly, which is an adverb. I would have used this first translation but when I saw that 漫长 translates as endless in the second phrase I compared the two.

    I don't know what time frame the first line occurs in. Present tense? - As he remembers the revolutionary years he is endlessly excited, or past tense? - As he remembered the revolutionary years he was endlessly excited.

    • 岁月漫长,世事如白云苍狗

    I'm not sure about the last line, Nciku.com says that it's a saying meaning "how things change in this world". My literal translation looks a bit silly but it's based on my current knowledge so I will leave it as it stands.

  16. Use the translated English lyrics below to find the title and artist of the song. Bonus points for providing a video or audio link. A short audio clip is provided as an additional hint, should you need it.
     



    We chat every night
    We go tit for tat, always those two phrases
    Did you miss me?
    I’m really missing you
    Hualalalalala
    Hualalalalala
    Stars are falling from heaven
    This, isn’t it pretty good?

    He has a wife
    This doesn’t matter, it doesn’t bother me
    We don’t talk about the future or the past
    Mood becomes so beautiful
    Otherwise... what?
    It really doesn’t matter

    He says he wants to come, to come see me
    Ah, I’m actually rather scared
    What kind of person is he
    I have no idea
    I just know his WeChat account
    Basically
    This isn’t great

    Day after day, it just goes on like this
    Meet or don’t meet, this is a conundrum
    He’s so enthusiastic
    If I refuse
    Those tedious, long nights...
    Oh, I shouldn’t refuse
    Can we just push it back a bit
    Anyway
    Anyway
    Anyway
    We aren’t lacking anything
     

    clip.mp3

     



    Answer

    Spoiler

     

    Title: 微信
    Artist: 孔大宁
    Link: https://youtu.be/ZQe7PmEg_4A
    Translation: https://www.notion.so/95e8b975fa0b43e6b08db1b50eacaa31

    Chinese lyrics

    我们每晚,每晚聊天
    说来说去总是那两句
    你想我了吗
    我好想你呀
    哗啦哗啦哗啦
    哗啦啦啦啦啦
    天上掉星星啦
    这样,不是挺好吗

    他有一个结婚对象
    这没有什么,我并不介意
    我们不谈什么将来和过去
    心情变得好美丽
    其他……什么?
    真的没关系

    他说要来,要来看我
    哎呀,我居然会有一点害怕
    他是什么人
    我都不知道
    只有一个微信号
    总之
    感觉不太妙

    一天一天就这样过去
    约还是不约,这是一个问题
    他那么热烈
    我要是拒绝
    那漫漫的长夜
    欧,我不要拒绝
    能不能再晚一些
    反正
    反正
    反正
    什么都不缺

     

     

  17. Well its been a while since I updated this blog and I have tons of excuses why and why I haven't studied for 6 weeks until last week. But that's what they are just excuses, and I should of never of stopped. So I am going to redo all the NPCR chapters I have already finished, redo most of the pimsluers I have completed and re listen to podcasts that I already know. I know this will take a few weeks but I will be back up to where I was and with accurate tones and words. Has this happened to anyone else? Seems like at times stepping back a few steps will help your get to your destintion.

  18. js6426
    Latest Entry

    Hey guys, sorry it’s been so long since I did an update.

     

    I graduated successfully with a 92 average, which was number one, but honestly it basically feels meaningless. My final thesis was on the 3 body problem.

     

    Doing the final year and a half online was a disaster, and my Chinese went downhill massively - thanks covid.

    All the student had to speak, which meant we got about 3 minutes per class to actually use Chinese. Time differences also made it challenging. 
     

    Glad that I graduated of course. I guess the question is, would I recommend this degree to anyone else? Probably not, but it depends on what you want to get out of it. My classmates were all young and were basically there to party and end up with a degree, I was there to learn Chinese. In person was better by far. Also important to recognize it was a Chinese language and literature degree. Classes on Chinese mythology were a waste of time for what I wanted, and my time would have been better used doing self study on stuff I would actually use.

     

    I also really struggled with being treated like a child - things like having attendance taken at every lecture. In England you can attend lectures if you want, but exam results are what matter. If you fail then that’s on you, if you can pass without attending class then it’s all good, but that just wasn’t an option for us in China, to the point where you wouldn’t get a visa if you missed a certain amount of classes.

     

    I’m glad I did it as I learnt a lot, but if I could go back in time I probably wouldn’t have bothered.

  19. 只要有你 

    As long as you are here with me

    Original by 那英

    Translated and performed by Enjune Zhang

     

    谁能告诉我 有没有这样的笔

    Who could tell me if

    There is a pen like this

    能画出一双双不流泪的眼睛

    It could get those eyes painted

    Shining without tears

    留得住世上一纵既逝的光阴

    Make the time stay

    Keep it from being vanished

    能让所有美丽从此也不再凋零

    Keep all the beauty evergreen

    And the colors never faded

    如果是这样 我可以安慰自己

    If it is what things could be

    I could get myself comforted

    在没有你的夜里 能发出一线光明

    It could be the light around me

    When I'm lonely in the darkness

    留得住快乐 全部都送去给你

    I will give it all to you

    All the remaining happiness

    苦涩的味道变得甜蜜

    With you even the bitter becomes sweet

    从此也不用分开 相爱的天和地

    From now on there's no need

    To get the heaven and earth separated

    还能在同一天空月亮太阳再相遇

    Right in the same sky again

    We see the sun and the moon meet

    生命中只要有你 什么都变得可以

    Everything's possible

    With you next to me

    让所有流星随时都相遇

    Shooting stars may find each other

    I wish to be their witness

    从此在人世上面没有无奈和分离

    Wish that there will be

    No more departing helpless

    我不用睁着眼睛看你远走的背影

    I don't have to see you leaving

    And can do nothing

    没有变幻的青春 没有失落的爱情

    Youth and love stay with me

    Growing deep without changing

    所有承诺永恒得像星星

    May the promises be like the stars everlasting

     

    As long as you are here with me.m4a

  20. suMMit
    Latest Entry

    OK, this is barely cooking, but so delicious. Had this home 烧烤 a few days ago. The beef was sent frozen and vacuum sealed as a gift from my wife's friend in Guangzhou. She sent it to us to have during the impending BJ lockdown...which never happened - hooray! 

     

     

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  21. Here's the link to our club: https://www.joinclubhouse.com/club/芝加哥汉语聊天社. Anyone on Clubhouse can follow our club.

     

    Our regular meeting is now on Saturday evenings at 7 pm CST. If you want to become a member, please attend a meeting and ask to be added as a member. Membership gives you the right to open a room on behalf of the club, which will automatically notify all other members of the club. It possibly notifies followers as well, but I'm not sure about that.

     

  22. image.png.7da1f7aa3e463f8cfdc27b67c9f39064.pngimage.png.9a1ae91a50eafcce4dce8473080d4d60.png

     

    幕帖训练

    image.thumb.png.f6c32b520c46ae09ff63376d3afca7d0.png

     

    醉汉带着许多节日礼物上了公共汽车。他死命地抓住车上的扶手,以防摔倒。售票员问:“要不要帮忙?”
    醉汉回答:“请吧,你帮我抓住扶杆,我来掏钱买票。”

  23. Its now been about a year and a half since I last posted in this blog, and a lot has happened in that time. I wanted to return here to set down some progress updates and new targets. Hopefully some of you might find it interesting and/or useful! 

     

    Covid accelerated my move into the translation industry when I thought I might go into language education, largely because of the work at home aspect of the job. In the last few years there have been some boring projects along the way, but also some really fascinating ones too. Regardless, I've become a lot more involved and interested in the industry than I thought I might when I completed my Masters in T+I back in 2019. Sitting at home in lockdown has also meant I've had a lot of time to work on my notetaking skills for interpreting, as well as actively building vocabulary in specific professional fields (as per my 2018 post, I've now surpassed 20k general vocab and still come across new words all the time - my experience is very similar in this respect to recent posts by @Woodford). I'm now looking at returning to interpreting and integrating it into my professional life.

     

    I once said I wouldn't pursue this route, but in recent months I've been gravitating more towards interpreting practice in my daily study, and I'm starting to feel like I am actually getting the hang of the multitasking now - I've certainly improved since I was on the program, thats for sure. Anyway, I've decided I'm going to study for the DPSI here in the UK, to give me a target to work towards and push me to work harder at training up my interpreting skills, which I confess I have largely avoided since graduating (sorry to @Moki in particular, who started a great thread here but I never got organised enough to contribute to in the end).

     

    Either way, its another few years of graft to gain a comprehensive grasp of English Law in both English and Chinese, but I'm looking forward to it - so look forward to more updates on this blog in the future!

     

     

    Another aside: I'm happy to say I've got back on my Canto in the last few months too, which I'm very happy about, and hopefully can make some good headway with it in the coming years too.

  24. Haven't really had a chance to update since the new term began, I had my thesis proposal in early September which felt like more of a defense than a proposal. Out of my panel only one of the professors could really ask me questions because the other two didn't have a background in cognitive linguistics and didn't really understand my topic. So I spent 20 minutes of defending my topic with this one professor (Actually my old Consecutive interpreting professor)  who began with "honestly this just feels like an idea on paper" ... ummm.... yes.. thats what a proposal is lmfao. but I continued to humor her and stand by my topic. It was rough, actually the entire classroom went through this slurry of vicious attacks toward our topics that if you were unable to defend yourself you would just be stuck standing there listening to them shit on you for 20 minutes. The hardest part was that everyone had to stay in the room so it was roughly 4 hours of listening to each student present and defend themselves. But I survived and my proposal passed somehow even though one of the panel told me that she felt that my topic was really interesting but just not for me. 

     

    This term I only have 4 classes. Written translation on Mondays, And 2 simultaneous interpreting courses on Friday. Our Tuesday classes (4 hours) began sometime after the holidays and every week since then has been a mental torture. The original teacher for the class "cross-cultural communications" was supposed to be an interesting guy from Australia. Unfortunately this guy is under Confucius scholarship studying his Phd and cant continue his teaching so we got stuck with the same guy who taught us last semester in 4 hour brackets. 

     

    Yes... that professor. I don't like to judge but this class should just be renamed "My musings" because every class has just been about him rambling off  things from his mind for four hours. Nothing he says has anything to do with the class or to anything even remotely useful. It actually feels like he's just trolling the class, because I don't understand how someone can talk about an ant and tiger analogy for four hours straight. I think the worst part of this class is that his musings always lead to something totally inappropriate. So something extremely racist or sexist, or homophobic crosses his mind and he just goes on and on and it really hurts me to hear that so many of my classmates find this "PHD" so interesting, when he would literally be crucified in my country for the things hes said. I don't know how someone like him has studied in America. I've been bringing my study materials and books to read in class so that I don't have to listen to that garbage that he says, but you know its really hard to block out something so completely inappropriate. 

     

    But other than his inappropriateness his classes are just a waste of time. I'm not even kidding when I say that I had to listen to him talk about colors yesterday. He started from Red and ended on Gray and then looked at the time and we had about 20 minutes left of class and he mused "what other colors have i missed? Oh yeah Brown!".

     

    The Monday translation professor is a close second to a professor I have no respect for this term. This lady prepares nothing for class. Her classes are prepared by a different classmate each week. And I'm not talking about just a short presentation. No. I'm talking about a full class, including creating group work exercises etc. She does nothing. What she does is sit there and when shes given the remainder of the class to add anything (roughly 20 minutes) her response is "well what am I supposed to do?" ...... um. Teach. That's what you get paid for . That's your job. In the very beginning of the term the professor wasn't clear she wanted us to basically teach the class every week so in week 2 when we came to class this lady had some nerve to criticize us all for being irresponsible and unprepared for class. She does this from time to time when people are late. I'm legit rolling my eyes in that class every week. 

     

    The only class worth mentioning is our simultaneous interpreting classes held on Fridays. The classes have been really difficult but really good for exercise. The only qualm I have is that I have my recordings played every class for both sections, so every week I have to hear my lousy interpretations twice in the same day (from E-C and C-E) its rough but I've gotten so used to it that Its kind of like meh whatever to me. Though its kind of irritating that its always the same people played every week. I haven't heard half of my classmates in that class even once. 

     

    So other than classes what have I been up to? Its a semester that leaves a lot open. I've been trying to work on honing my interpreting skills, especially in simultaneous interpreting which I find to be quite challenging. My professor suggested shadowing for about 10-15 minutes a day to get used to keeping up with the pace. A problem that many of us have with simultaneous is waiting too long to begin, and only speaking in 3 word clusters instead of having a fluid sentence. I've been shadowing with this program 《绝密档案》 from the app 蜻蜓。 The app itself has a lot of different podcasts to choose from to listen. I just find this program particularly interesting so after 15 mins of shadowing I just continue listening to the rest of the story. I've also made use of going over some of my old resources that we had from past classes so Ive been going over speeches that have Chinese and English to work on a more formal register and also to get a feel for collocations. 

     

    I wanted to work this semester but I think that with the thesis and everything I'd rather just focus on my studies this term. Its sad to be without the extra cash but I have my whole life to make money but just this year to really work on my studies. I've still been keeping my eyes on jobs because I'd like to find a job after my studies and stay here for another year. As much as China kills me at times, I'm not ready to leave. 

     

    That's it. Our first draft of our thesis is expected to be ready by December for our pre-defense. The date hasn't been confirmed yet but we've been told already we should have a minimum of 19,000 written. I still need to set my study up and get a move on it.  I'll try and keep this blog up to date! 

  25. A few days ago, I finished reading the short story collection 《樱海集》 by 老舍. This brought my reading total above one million characters, completing my goal for the year.

     

    《樱海集》 was first published in 1935. The collection contains a funny and self-effacing preface plus ten short stories of varying lengths (from six to forty-two pages). The stories deal with classical human failings—hypocrisy, pride, envy, bitterness, cowardice, lust, revenge, greed, anger—and the consequences that arise from such failings. Though the stories are thematically related, they differ considerably in their characters, plots, point of views, and settings.

     

    Below is a brief synopsis of each story, along with some amplifying details and concluding thoughts.

     

     

    1. The first story in the collection, 《上任》, is about a recently promoted government official named 尤老二 and the opium-smoking thugs he employs. Much of the story is concerned with 尤老二’s inability to pay for his thugs, who show up at odd times asking for money for travel and other expenses. This story was difficult for me to get into. I found the details of the plot hard to follow and the language more challenging than any other story in the collection.
       
    2. 《牺牲》 is a character sketch of 毛博士, a bizarre 崇洋媚外 teacher educated in the United States.
       
    3. 《柳屯的》 is about a small village, a powerful Christian family, and an unrestrained woman who tries to take over them both.
       
    4. 《末一块钱》 is about a young dissatisfied college student who yearns for the kind of life enjoyed by his more affluent classmates.
       
    5. 《老年的浪漫》 is about an old man who, cursed with greedy former colleagues and a foolish son, decides to settle old scores.
       
    6. 《毛毛虫》 is a very short story that asks the question: What does a community think about that unenviable husband and wife who live down the street, and that husband’s former wife, and their new children?
       
    7. 《善人》 is about a well-to-do woman who sees herself as generous but is oblivious to the suffering of those around her.
       
    8. This story was my favorite story of the collection. 《邻居们》 is about the tensions that flare up between two neighboring families after one receives the other’s mail by mistake.

      The 明 family and the 杨 family are neighbors. 明家 is selfish and uncivilized. 杨家 is altruistic and lettered. The husband and father in the 杨 family, 杨先生, is described as a “最新式的中国人.”

      One day, 杨先生 receives a letter addressed to 明先生. 杨太太 attempts to deliver the letter, but 明太太 misunderstands her neighbor’s intentions and rebuffs her. 杨先生 then writes his own letter explaining the situation. 明太太 refuses this letter, too. Tensions between the two families escalate. 杨先生 believes that he and 明先生 can resolve their differences like rational gentlemen, and continues to write his neighbor letters. 明先生 sees 杨先生 as a weak man and despises him for his bookishness and inaction. Eventually…
       
      Spoiler

      the 明家 children go into the 杨家 garden and stomp their flowers to smithereens. When 杨先生 comes home from work and sees his ruined garden, he flies into a rage and smashes every window of the 明家 house. 明先生 is not mad at his neighbor, but impressed with him. It turns out that 杨先生 is a red-blooded man of passion, after all.

    9. 《月牙儿》 is a longer story about a girl and her hard life after her father dies and her mother is forced out of exigence into prostitution.
       
    10. 《阳光》 is about the life of a beautiful, proud, and dissolute woman from a rich family. Her eventual arranged marriage to a prominent morality-promoting Daoist is comfortable, but stifling.

     

     

    《樱海集》 is the second work I’ve read by 老舍; the first was his delightful science fiction satire 《猫城记》. There is something irreverent about 老舍’s style in these two works. 老舍’s stories foreground the character defects of early 20th-century Chinese people, whatever their station in life. Opioid-addicted menial laborers, wives of rich businessmen, the orphaned, the educated, the religious and the ideologically possessed—none are spared.

     

    By pointing out character defects in such a wide-ranging way, 老舍 advances a kind of criticism of the Chinese society of his day. But 《樱海集》 is not a “critical” work, at least not in the sense that modern people use the term. It isn’t a systematic, theory-driven critique of Chinese society; nor is it especially tragic or concerned with issues of justice. Rather, 《樱海集》 is a moral work. The stories in 《樱海集》 are cautionary tales filled with negative moral examples. They are the modern literary equivalents of fables.

     

    The stories paint a pessimistic and probably unbalanced picture of Chinese life. Readers interested in positive moral examples—the righteous government official or revolutionary, the loving and longsuffering mother, the diligent young student who succeeds in life despite enormous opposition—will not find them here. Some of 老舍’s negative moral examples are also offensive to contemporary Western sensibilities. His portraits of women are pretty unflattering. 老舍’s women are ostentatious, stubborn, and quick to anger. (To be fair, the men don’t come off much better. Most of 老舍’s male protagonists are feckless hypocrites.) Others will find 老舍’s portrayal of poor people unsympathetic. The peasants in 《樱海集》 are lazy and spend what little money they find on drugs:

     

    Quote

    他拾起钱来,吹了吹,放在耳旁听听:“是真的!别再猫咬尿泡瞎喜欢!”放在袋中,一手扫地,一手按着那块钱。他打算着:还是买双鞋呢,还是……他决定多买四毛钱的“白面儿”,犒劳犒劳自己。

     

    It is interesting to consider 老舍’s portrayals of Chinese people in 《樱海集》 in light of then-upcoming theories about politics and art in China. In his lectures at Yan'an in 1942, Mao advocated a new pro-proletariat literature and denounced “petit bourgeois writers” that write “pessimistic literature” and “harm the people.” Were 老舍’s mid-1930’s stories compatible with the new Chinese literature Mao would soon advocate? Was 老舍’s literature “pessimistic”? [For the curious, I blogged about Mao’s Yan'an literature lectures in an earlier post on this blog.]

     

    The Chinese language in 《樱海集》 is not especially difficult. The vocabulary is more challenging than contemporary Chinese fiction writers like 余华 and 韩寒, but far easier than writers like 张爱玲 and 莫言. 老舍’s word choices are frequently different from those found in contemporary fiction. This may confuse language learners unfamiliar with early 20th-century Chinese literature. For the uninitiated, try reading other authors from the same period. (I read short stories by 丁玲, 沈从文, and 施蛰存 before. That helped.)

     

    My new year’s resolution was to read one million characters in books and articles in 2019. I have now reached that goal with a little over a month to spare. This year I read mostly fiction. I also read Mao’s literature lectures, an article by IBM, a undergraduate thesis on the music of American saxophonist Sonny Stitt, and a third of the Bible. It’s been a great and rewarding experience.

     

    From time to time, people ask about the value of studying Chinese language given recent political and economic changes in China. It’s a fair question; there are many reasons to study Chinese and people differ in their motivations and goals. For me, the desire to engage in the cultural and literary traditions of a large and important foreign world was and is a main driver of my Chinese study. This desire was sustained and strengthened this year. I intend to keep reading in Chinese, both fiction and non-fiction. For literature, my near-term goals for the next couple years are to continue with works at or slightly above my current reading level; to move on to major works by 张爱玲, 莫言, and 阎连科; and to tackle tougher early 20th-century works by authors like 鲁迅. I’d like to wade into 文言 someday too, though that day is still a long way off.

     

    I had a lot of fun writing these posts and interacting with all of you. In the future, I may continue writing posts here. For now, however, because of many pressing demands on my time, I will put this blog on hiatus and return to posting intermittently in the excellent and underutilized “What are you reading?” thread.

     

    Thank you to everyone who read or commented on this blog this year.

     

     

    Link to《樱海集》:
    https://www.aixdzs.com/d/117/117466/

     

    Some statistics: 
    Characters read this year: 1,000,931
    Characters left to read this year: 0
    Percent of goal completed: 100%
      
    List of things read: 
    《三八节有感》by 丁玲   (2,370 characters) 
    《我在霞村的时候》by 丁玲   (10,754 characters) 
    《在延安文艺座谈会上的讲话》by 毛泽东   (18,276 characters) 
    《自杀日记》by 丁玲   (4,567 characters) 
    《我没有自己的名字》by 余华   (8,416 characters) 
    《手》by 萧红   (7,477 characters) 
    《牛》by 沈从文   (8,097 characters) 
    《彭德怀速写》by 丁玲   (693 characters) 
    《我怎样飞向了自由的天地》by 丁玲   (2,176 characters) 
    《IBM Cloud文档:Personality Insights》 by IBM   (25,098 characters) 
    《夜》by 丁玲   (4,218 characters) 
    《虎雏》by 沈从文   (46,945 characters) 
    《在巴黎大戏院》 by 施蛰存   (6,181 characters) 
    《分析Sonny Stitt即兴与演奏特点——以专辑《Only the Blues》中曲目 《Blues for Bags》为例》   (5,483 characters) 
    《一个女剧院的生活》 by 沈从文   (61,154 characters) 
    《致银河》 by 王小波   (17,715 characters) 
    《在细雨中呼喊》 by 余华   (132,769 characters) 
    《熊猫》 by 棉棉   (53,129 characters) 
    《1988:我想和这个世界谈谈》 by 韩寒   (81,547 characters) 
    《偶然事件》 by 余华   (20,226 characters)
    《第七天》 by 余华  (84,847 characters)
    《圣经》 (新译本)  (1,055,606 characters; 315,144 read in 2019)
    《樱海集》 by 老舍  (83,649 characters)

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