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  • Publius 8
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Entries in this blog

skylee

This made me laugh ...

... and I was really happy. I took this in a big G.O.D. (Goods Of Desire; 住好啲) shop in Causeway Bay. I am kind of a fan of this brand, and I think the designer Douglas Young is quite talented.

Now just figure out what it is about. It is in Cantonese (some well-learned members might say it is not. But to me, a lesser Chinese who lives in Hong Kong, this is Cantonese enough). Thank you for reading this post. :P

PS - and I think that this item is for display only.

jbradfor

One Child Policy

Since we haven't had a (proper *cough* *cough*) posing in a while, I think I would add this one from a while back.

Just one question: does one still see such signs?

skylee

Footbridge

This was taken on a footbridge close to the place where you apply for a Chinese Visa in Wanchai, Hong Kong. :P

There is another one saying the same thing on the same footbridge. And they have been there for a while. It seems that, unlike some of the graffiti saying "Who's afraid of XXX", these graffiti have attracted no attention at all (except mine). ;)

roddy
This was snapped at the Immigration Museum in Melbourne. It's a poster opposing immigration by Chinese, dating from the 1860s.
Question for you is - what or who are fan tan and pak ah-pu. Both answers are easily found online, so try and have a guess (or use pre-existing knowledge should you have any) before looking them up and spoiling it for everyone else ;-)
xiaocai
Alright, these questions can be quite hard I think, but everyone is welcome to attempt.
1. Where (PLACE NAME, better make it clear first this time) do you think this picture was taken at?
2. What is written on the sign? (I do NOT have answer to this question, because I have no idea what it means, either. Maybe it is just not Chinese altogether. It will be much appreciated if anyone can identify the message and share it with me and other forum member.)
skylee
I walked past the City Hall in Central (Hong Kong) today and saw this inscription again. The picture was taken years ago. See if you can figure out what it means.
I wrote about this (twice!) in my own blog (in Chinese). If you are interested, take a look at this and this.
PS - Pictures of the English version and the bronze gates added on 9 April 2011.
roddy
Laughing at inaccurate use of English isn't big or clever. So you're only allowed to smile.
(I wanted to make a post, but this was the only photo I had handy)
xiaocai
Maybe someone has posted similar photos before but I'd add a few questions with this one:
1.How many different services can you identify?
2.Where do you think it is most likely to be taken?
Sorry for the large size of the picture (1200X1600) but some interesting (at least I thought they are ) details would have been missing if it had been resized any smaller.
skylee
This is rare, in this age of telecommunications where people receive news on their cell phones, computers or on TV/radio almost instantly. I got this at about 4PM today whereas the announcement was made at 11AM (Beijing time). So it had taken about five hours for this news to reach me. Not too bad for paper medium.
The last time I saw such a thing I was in Tokyo. That day a man stabbed many people dead in Akihabara, thus the paper.
So what is this piece of paper called?
In it there is a term which is seldom used nowadays - 伏法. What does it mean?
I used an envelope to cover a gruesome picture.
skylee
I took this picture (a table cloth in a resturant) at Lecce a few days ago. What do you think it means?
PS - I also attach another picture taken in the modern art museum in Bologna. Judging by the shape of the first character I think it is supposed to be Japanese (in Chinese it should have been 常設展 or 展品). Anyone cares to comment if it is correct in Japanese? (At another display of this musuem the word コレクシュン was used, which I think is correct.)
skylee
I saw this poster yesterday when I was on an escalator. I was quite surprised, mainly by Charles' generosity (well he probably did not know what he was doing and it might be his wife's idea). The combined forces of illness and aging are intimidating.
I meant to take a picture of this today but had missed it (as I was on an escalator). So I had to go downstairs again to take this picture.
Now (Q1) see if you know what this poster is about. Do note the new Chinese name of the illness, which is now in use in Hong Kong, and (Q2) guess what the old Chinese name was. The name has been changed to project a more positive light to the patients. We did the same to another illness a few years back. That illness is now called 思覺失調 over here. (Q3) Guess what it means and what it was called before (you might have to google a bit).
roddy
Here's one with actual questions!
What event has promoted this trip?
What means of transport is to be used?
What two destinations are named?
Who is eligible to attend?
Are you too late?
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