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Signese

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Entries in this blog

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Dim Sum Menu

Here is the menu for the recent food article in which I reported on three mornings of Cantonese dim sum. This menu is from Yulong Seafood Hotpot Restaurant in Macau, near Ponte 16. The dim sum article is here: https://www.chinese-forums.com/forums/topic/54982-enjoying-dim-sum/?tab=comments#comment-424075

 

(You can click the photos to enlarge them.)

 

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The waitress brings a pencil along with the menu, and you put a check mark below the items that you want to eat. She told me it didn't matter which box I checked, one of which is for ordering an item a la carte 单点 and the other for ordering an item as part of a larger meal 加单。

 

She returns later with a typed receipt for the order as it was entered into their system. Always a good idea to double check at that point to be sure there was no mixup. Pricing category designations appear beside the name of the item: 特点,大点,中点,小点。

 

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I always try to pick up a blank extra menu so I can study it at my leisure later in the day and do a better job of ordering tomorrow.

 

 

roddy

The Return to Kiroran

With that spirit of sacrifice common to all members here at Chinese-forums.com, @DrWatson has provided us with pictures of the menu at Kiroran. Our correspondent writes:

 

Quote

 

I most definitely snapped a photo of the menu as well, that was the primary purpose of taking the photos, and it was only then I thought of Signese. Sorry...my stomach thinks before my brain sometimes!

 

Any thoughts on the menu, any of these dishes worth trying? The prices are a bit high, but I am guessing for some of those dishes they are meant to be shared in a group.  I thought the 麻辣鸡 and the Loulan Spicy pot looked good, also I'm always up for hot pot, unfortunately the hot pot menu was not posed on the shop window.

 

I am more hesitant about the noodle dishes though, I don't know why but it looks like Spaghetti in some of the photos, but hopefully it is actually pulled noodles...

 

 

葱爆羊肉 for me. What's everyone else having?

 

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roddy

Signese Revival 8

One fairly random photo of Chinese characters in action, per week, until sometime in 2018. And perhaps longer if I'm encouraged. Those who want to contribute their own random photos of Chinese characters are welcome, just get in touch and I'll add you to the contributor list so you can post directly, from computer or phone.

 

I like to think of some poor foreign student recognising the first character and assuming from context he can get his puncture sorted out off to the left.

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roddy

Kiroran

A submission from @DrWatson from his friendly neighbourhood restaurant. Hands up if you think we should send him back to get a photo of the rest of the menu. 

 

Quiz: The Chinese name doesn't match up with the English one. Who or what was it named after? Where does Kiroran come into it?

 

And if you already know the answer, don't post ;-)

 

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roddy

Signese Revival 7

One fairly random photo of Chinese characters in action, per week, until sometime in 2018. And perhaps longer if I'm encouraged. Those who want to contribute their own random photos of Chinese characters are welcome, just get in touch and I'll add you to the contributor list so you can post directly, from computer or phone.

 

Signs like this are (or were) common, as people tried to order their own surroundings a bit closer to the heart's desire.

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roddy

Signese Revival 6

One fairly random photo of Chinese characters in action, per week, until sometime in 2018. And perhaps longer if I'm encouraged. Those who want to contribute their own random photos of Chinese characters are welcome, just get in touch and I'll add you to the contributor list so you can post directly, from computer or phone.

 

It's clear what it means, but I like to think of someone trying to just rent a meaty stick.

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roddy

Signese Revival 5

One fairly random photo of Chinese characters in action, per week, until sometime in 2018. And perhaps longer if I'm encouraged. Those who want to contribute their own random photos of Chinese characters are welcome, just get in touch and I'll add you to the contributor list so you can post directly, from computer or phone.

 

Love of your own safety and respiratory health optional.

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roddy

Signese Revival 4

One fairly random photo of Chinese characters in action, per week, until sometime in 2018. And perhaps longer if I'm encouraged. Those who want to contribute their own random photos of Chinese characters are welcome, just get in touch and I'll add you to the contributor list so you can post directly, from computer or phone.

 

You can all write this from memory, can't you? Taken by Randall in Beijing in 2006. 

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roddy

Signese Revival 3

One fairly random photo of Chinese characters in action, per week, until sometime in 2018. And perhaps longer if I'm encouraged. Those who want to contribute their own random photos of Chinese characters are welcome, just get in touch and I'll add you to the contributor list so you can post directly, from computer or phone.

 

This one was from Skyee, taken in Pingyao. Now, what shouldn't you do to the produce?

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roddy

Signese Revival 2

One fairly random photo of Chinese characters in action, per week, until sometime in 2018. And perhaps longer if I'm encouraged. Those who want to contribute their own random photos of Chinese characters are welcome, just get in touch and I'll add you to the contributor list so you can post directly, from computer or phone.

 

Road safety this week.

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roddy

Signese Revival 1

One fairly random photo of Chinese characters in action, per week, until sometime in 2018. And perhaps longer if I'm encouraged. Those who want to contribute their own random photos of Chinese characters are welcome, just get in touch and I'll add you to the contributor list so you can post directly, from computer or phone.

 

This one's a message to anyone who thinks people are interested in a weekly picture of Chinese characters.

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roddy

Signese Revival 0

One fairly random photo of Chinese characters in action, per week, until around this time in 2018. And perhaps longer if I'm encouraged. Those who want to contribute their own random photos of Chinese characters are welcome, just get in touch and I'll add you to the contributor list so you can post directly, from computer or phone. 

 

And what better to start with than breakfast?

 

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skylee

From Madrid

Once again I am at the Thyssen-Bornesmisza museum in Madrid. This is one of my favourite museums which I have visited repeatedly. It has just occurred to me that the Museum has chosen to use Simplified Chinese in some (not all) of its signs (as shown), which seems a bit unusual / unconventional. I mean, usually, such museums would only use their native languages and the better ones would have English (like Prado, which is another great museum that I visited again yesterday). If a musuem chooses to use an Asian language, I think it would usually go for Japanese. The museum's brochure is of course in several different languages, including Chinese and Japanese. And as usual there is not a Korean version. At Prado yesterday I actually saw a group of Korean tourists with their own translated guide to the masterpieces, which I assumed that the tour guide / company had done for them.

I appreciate that all three of the grand museums in Madrid are open for free for everyone (every evening for Prado and Reina Sofia, and Thyssen-B on Monday PM). I think it is very generous of them.

PS - And the British Museum is always free (but suggests donation of like 5 pounds, haha).

skylee

From Sevilla - 出力

Sevilla is gorgeous. It is cold and sunny so a good way to spend some time is to sit under the sun and type up a blog post.

I have just done the obligatory visit to the Cathedral (the third time), and I took these pictures there. The first one is about the lack of Chinese, and the second one is about 出力.

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skylee

From Paris - 巴黎聖母院

I am currently at the Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris. I think it is kind and generous of the church to let tourists in and take pictures during mass. Many churches don't allow it. (But then at the same time the church is also selling souvenirs to and making money from tourists.)

Most signs are in multiple languages including Chinese. I have noted an interesting inconsistency. While most Chinese signs are in simplified Chinese, the sign asking for donations for the new bells is in traditional Chinese. Possible reasons: (1) general confusion over the two scripts in the "western" world; (2) the translations were done by different translators; (3) users of traditional Chinese are much more likely to donate money than users of simplified Chinese as the majority of the latter group are from mainland China where there are church problems (although the latter group is rich nowadays).

I think (3) is likely to be the reason.

Another interesting thing is the different names for the Treasury in Japanese, Korean and Chinese - 秘寶、 寶物、珍寶.

skylee

From Taipei

Again I am in Taipei. This is not a well planned trip as I booked my ticket/hotel and did all the arrangements just yesterday. Anyways.

I've just taken this picture at Eslite in Xinyi. 男化妝室 is just so odd.

Thr other picture is a bonus, haha.

Is there anything I should do so that the pictures can be of the correct orientation after uploading?

skylee

From Seoul

I am now in Seoul. The city is much more tourist-friendly than when I first visited it solo over 10 years ago. There is English on most signs in Seoul now. And there are Chinese characters too. But sometimes I can't help but wonder if the Chinese characters are supposed to be Chinese, or Japanese Kanji or their own Hanja. Sometimes the characters don't look quite right if they are meant to be Chinese.

Look at the first two picturs. There is something very wrong in the first one, at least it is not in line with the common understanding AFAIK. I am not sure if it is intentional. Is the term 正体字(not 正體字) used to refer to simplified characters at all?

The 昇 in the third picture is wrong AFAIK.

I was quite speechless when I saw the sign in the fourth picture. 乳母車?貸與? They can't be right, right?

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PS - additional picture added on 29.4.2014. This is relevant to the fifth reply below.

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skylee

Xu Bing, Taipei

I went to the Xu Bing Retrospective in Taipei today, and am very glad that I did. I am sure there is a lot of information on the internet about his works, but I was fascinated all the same.

Many of his works are related to languages. Like his ABC series which is about representing English letters using Chinese characters. (Photos 1 to 2)

Then there is the square word calligraphy series, which is about writing each English word in a square. I think the idea is similar to the Korean script, but the Xu Bing version is not as tidy, mainly because English is not Korean, IMHO. And some square words look quite messy, as there are just too many components (long words). I don't think it is a very inventive series and the idea is not very different from the Chinese letters that tattooists use to con the uninformed. But it is fun, and is not difficult to learn and decipher. And, hey, it is Xu Bing. (Photos 3 to 6) You can see in Photo 3 "square word" and "Xu Bing". And in Photo 6 the first words (from left) are "four poems of W B Yeats, calligraphy by Xu Bing".

And then there is of course the 天書 series (Photo 7), which needs no introduction. I am not a big fan of his more recent 地書 series, though.

The exhibition will end on 20 April 2014.

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skylee

From Singapore

I went to Singapore for a weekend break and spent most of my time in museums (instead of Little India, the waterfront and malls, etc), which was probably why I liked the country a bit better. I have some observations on the Chinese shown on some exhibits in the museums.

First, 肅清. Actually what struck me was the title "The Sook Ching". It is based on the Cantonese pronunciation I suppose. When I showed my friend this photo she was quite surprised that the title was not the "massacre".

Second, an old notice for Chinese hawkers. Note the different directions in which the words are printed on the same notice - vertically from right to left, horizintally from left to right, and horizontally from right to left. :P Traditional Chinese characters are used on this notice, and the name of the country on this notice is 新嘉坡. But this is a decades-old notice.

Third, the name of the dish Char Kway Teow. 炒粿條 is used in the photo. If I am not mistaken it is the same thing as what we call 炒貴刁 over here in HK. The Chinese terms are very different

Fourth, Chinese by a Vietnamese artist. It is all right. Although some characters used are odd / wrong (like the 垂 and 淂) but it is not difficult to get the general idea of the meaning.

I hope you find them interesting. Please share your views.

skylee

Line character - Cony

I asked the shop assistant to let me take a photo, explaining to her that people who don't speak Cantonese might not understand what the words mean at all.

So, do you know what the words mean?

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