Jump to content
Chinese-forums.com
Learn Chinese in China

Signese

  • entries
    353
  • comments
    1,419
  • views
    191,195

Contributors to this blog

  • roddy 143
  • anonymoose 85
  • skylee 61
  • abcdefg 10
  • mungouk 8
  • StChris 8
  • Publius 8
  • Tomsima 6
  • jbradfor 5
  • xiaocai 4
  • somethingfunny 4
  • ChTTay 3
  • Flying Pigeon 2
  • stapler 2
  • DrWatson 2
  • murrayjames 1
  • js6426 1

沙士(示)汽水

skylee

1,894 views

I took this picture today at a supermarket. The first thing that came up in my mind was "Why is this called 沙士?" and it took only seconds for me to remember the reason. This soft drink has brought back some childhood memory.

No when I was little we didn't have soft drinks imported from Australia. But we had a root beer by Watson's called Sarsae, which is still available today. Its Chinese name is 沙示, which I think has to do with the ingredient Sarsaparilla. In Taiwan a similar drink is called 沙士. The wiki has more information. So this is why root beer is called 沙士/示.

Whenever I think of the Sarsae drink I remember the song George Lam (林子祥) sang for its ad. It was a cover version of

, and in place of "sunny" he sang "沙示". I can still sing the song today. :) Too bad I can't find that commercial online.


4 Comments


Recommended Comments

This may sound stupid but why does it say "invert bottle before opening"?

Wouldn't everything spill out that way?

And why no Chinese labeling? In America, even imported stuff has some English labelling or they slap on a sticker with some English.

Most shop items in Chinese stores come with Chinese and Vietnamese (lot of Vietnamese-Chinese since the boat people arrived). Some items even have Thai (lot of Thai-Chinese and Cambodian-Chinese as well).

Kobo.

Share this comment


Link to comment

English is an official language in Hong Kong. So it is all right that there is just English (and no Chinese) labeling on the bottles. Sometimes there is not even English labelling on the product (e.g. French / Italian wines). Nobody seems to mind.

Share this comment


Link to comment

Bundaberg *ginger* beer - that's a refreshing drink to have while lying on sandy soil!

Share this comment


Link to comment
This may sound stupid but why does it say "invert bottle before opening"?

Wouldn't everything spill out that way?

I guess they could add "and then make upright" between the "bottle" and the "before", but for most of us it's not necessary :mrgreen:

Share this comment


Link to comment
×
×
  • Create New...