Jump to content
Chinese-forums.com
Learn Chinese in China

All Activity

This stream auto-updates     

  1. Past hour
  2. I agree with Jan Finster. At the veterans hospital in Louisiana where I am continuing to work due to my job classification as essential, I myself am wearing one every day at work. Due to frequent in-person interaction with veterans, all cashiers, receptionists, couriers, nurses, and pharmacists are now wearing masks at all times at work. This includes the screeners posted at the main gate.
  3. Today
  4. Note that for all we know, everyone there was infected, since tests were carried out on only some. The key sentence buried in the article: "Health officials said all 28 choir members who were tested for COVID-19 were found to be infected." I think they thought the virus wouldn't touch them there, a ruralish area 60 miles north of Seattle.
  5. No, it really, really, does matter who started it. The Chinese government decided to sneak this in at precisely the moment Western countries were starting to deal with the worse of the virus. While I understand the argument that combating the virus should be number one priority, it also also necessary to not let them get away setting a false narrative like that. They could have just said that an American tourist accidentally passed on a virus while in Wuhan if they wanted to go the xenophobia route, but they decided to go full "the US military may have deliberately planted this" route, which is much more dangerous. If you were to say Trumps method of counterattacking was a little crude, I accept that, but there is no denying that it was effective - it scared the Chinese government enough to stop their attack dogs from barking anymore at least.
  6. We shouldn't let this NY Times story pass by, because I think it represents the line the Beijing leadership is taking in response to foreign criticism that it's responsible for the world being in crisis. It's basically Obama's "I learned about it reading the newspaper just like you folks" defense. Or more fully, "We tried hard really hard to set up mechanisms to prevent this, but despite our best efforts the people in Wuhan nonetheless managed to hoodwink us. So don't blame us. We're victims, too." https://www.nytimes.com/2020/03/29/world/asia/coronavirus-china.html
  7. Do you really believe that any foreign ministry spokesman (or any Chinese newspaper for that matter) would dare to spread such conspiracy theories without authorisation from anyone higher up? These conspiracy theories didn't originate from some random internet users, they have been spread by actual foreign ministry officials. Having someone in his level disseminate this fake news gives it just enough credence to get attention, while being far away enough from Xi and the higher ups so as to claim that they knew nothing about it. There are plenty of reasons to dislike or oppose Trump, but that shouldn't mean automatically jumping on the side of anyone who is against him, especially the CCP. We need to get the basic facts straight before there is any chance of a productive conversation about this.
  8. I'm happy to be corrected, but this appears to be untrue. Here is an article from the 13th of March quoting a Chinese foreign ministry spokesman concocting conspiracy theories, and here is a CNN report on Trump being criticised for saying "Chinese virus" dated 19th of March. Seems like a pretty clear line of cause and effect. The CNN article even quotes Trump himself saying that him using that terminology is a direct response to the Chinese propaganda:It appears that the anti-Trump media themselves It appears that the anti-Trump media themselves were quite content with calling the variously the "Wuhan virus", "Chinese virus" and "China virus" for a long period of time, as this video shows.
  9. A church in Washington state asked it's choir members to practice as usual on 10 March. They provided hand sanitizer and asked people not to hug. 60 members showed up for the practice. The results were terrible: The LA Times reports: Nearly three weeks later, 45 have been diagnosed with COVID-19 or ill with the symptoms, at least three have been hospitalized, and two are dead." It's an unfortunate experiment on the results of a what libertarian stances might yield. (We don't need no social distancing...." said with great irony) It also shows the importance of respiratory transmission. The article also notes: "The World Health Organization has downplayed the possibility of transmission in aerosols, stressing that the virus is spread through much larger “respiratory droplets,” which are emitted when an infected person coughs or sneezes and quickly fall to a surface." https://www.latimes.com/world-nation/story/2020-03-29/coronavirus-choir-outbreak
  10. Yesterday
  11. That's a lot. Perhaps people are making them last longer by reusing them.
  12. I live in Miami, Florida. Life is still pretty normal here, which is worrying. We have a non binding "shelter in place", but many people are not heeding it, since there is no enforcement. Most restaurants are open for takeout only. I work in an engineering firm, and we still go to the office, as so does many other firms. Supermarkets are open, but hours are modified. Only about 50% of people are wearing masks in public, and even those who do, many of them do the non-committal mask (where the mask only covers there mouth or hangs around there neck).
  13. Just start wearing them yourself. You can even make them yourself (see my earlier post). The more Caucasian people wear them, the earlier it becomes the norm. I have started wearing them a couple of days ago. Folks either ignore you, give you a wide berth or eye you suspiciously. No hostility. I feel cashiers at the grocery store really appreciated it!
  14. I find it interesting (in a bad way) how doctors of different countries react to triage, either the prospect of it or the actual practice. I first saw it reported from Italy, heart-broken doctors who were in tears as they explained they had to choose who to help and who to let die, and were warning other countries to act now or it would be too late. Today I read about a doctor in Brazil, who was well aware of the shortages in her hospital and dreading the prospect of doing triage, it was horrifying to her. Then on the very same page of the newspaper the fairly sober daily 'diary of a hospital nurse', where the nurse explained how 80-year-olds don't come out of intubation well, and every COVID-19 patient who came in had explained to them what the short-term and long-term consequences of an IC stay would be. Basically old sick people are asked to step aside, both in their own interest (they would not recover from an IC stay) and in the interest of other patients who will need the bed & the ventilator. The nurse did not use the term 'triage' for this at all, but that is basically what it is. And then your story of a Texas doctor who is already doing triage, and this is the first I read about triage in the US.
  15. brooklyn is not very representative of the united states, but i find more than half of the normal folks on the street now are wearing facemasks, many of them n95 types (don’t know where they all found them) seems like the stigma is receding here at least also mask memes trending on IG 😂
  16. Here in SW Connecticut - adjacent to but not right in the current US epicenter of NYC - things are busy but not utterly insane AFAICT; good supplies of almost everything at grocery stores (even toilet paper), hospitals are very busy but still enough PPE for the moment and nobody's wearing garbage bags (though a couple of hospitals have put up emergency tent facilities in parking lots to deal with the pending influx), vast majority of deaths appear to have been very old and/or unwell, and the governor (who's been in office for 2 years and up until now had kind of a poor track record, having picked a lot of fights with a lot of entrenched interests and gotten his butt kicked each time) has generally done a great job rolling out new measures at the earliest possible point people were ready to accept them. Restaurants closed 2 weeks ago, and school closures started happening at a town-by-town level almost 3 weeks ago and they've been closed statewide for 2 weeks, with the earliest possible reopening date currently pegged at May 1st. Commuter rail to NYC has started running on a severely reduced schedule so that should hopefully stem some of the new cases coming out from there; well-to-do New Yorkers have apparently been snatching up every short-term rental they can find in the suburbs (and farther out, e.g. in the Hamptons) but we don't have very many of those here and most people aren't interested in renting their house to somebody for 3 months so I doubt there'll be too many new cases introduced that way. And it's mostly single-family detached housing around here, so frankly with all of the major places of gathering closed there's not much room left for it to spread. Both kids' schools have been making good efforts at distance learning; older kid's school has been posting daily lessons / videos / activities / etc but without anything real-time or the expectation that we'll do any of it that day or do all of it at any point - definitely the way to go when people are trying to juggle homeschooling with work - while my preschooler has had daily Zoom meetings with his classmates which are again purely optional and not necessarily *teaching* that much but are at least a tiny bit of socialization with other kids his age to remind him how to do that. They seem to be learning at least as much with our little bit of homeschooling as they were learning at school before, so I'm not really worried about long-term consequences of this for them, but obviously we're luckier than most people and I think everybody is frankly way too casual about the dire consequences long-term school closures can have on less fortunate kids; there needs to be a conversation about how we can reopen schools without them turning into viral hotbeds, e.g. by restructuring schedules so that kids stay in the same room with the same peers all day and thus can only spread the virus to that room and not the entire school. Re masks, there's been pretty consistent messaging in the US that we don't have enough masks and you should save them for front-line medical workers; until we have masks in such abundance that nobody worries about that problem anymore, it's going to be very hard to remove the social stigma around them. But once there are boxes of masks piled up at the front of every grocery store / drugstore / Costco / etc, I think we can get people to start wearing them pretty quickly; suspicion of mask-wearing is widespread but shallow, and a couple of videos of Taylor Swift or whoever donning a mask and explaining why everyone else ought to do so would change minds in short order.
  17. Macy

    Shanghai Jiaotong University

    Hi! I just got admitted into the Antai College of Economic and Management (MIB) and I would love to find some people, who have also studied at SJTU. I want to know how the university experience at Xuhui campus is like, the quality of the lectures and maybe also find people, who will also start at the SJTU in September 2020.
  18. @roddy -- Report from a displaced 中国通 in America. Getting by in the Time of the Virus. Some of the incorporated suburbs of Dallas have recently passed a "shelter in place" order that means everyone needs to stay home if they are not going to and from their "essential" jobs or shopping for groceries/prescription pharmaceuticals. Other suburbs nearby have adopted a "libertarian" stance in which they decline to do that because it would infringe citizen rights. It has created a patchwork quilt. The small town in which I live has been a little more relaxed up to now. Many restaurants open for takeout. I have personally found grocery stores to be clean and orderly. They have hired quite a few temporary workers to wipe down the shelves and put up arriving supplies. They no longer have 27 brands of breakfast cereal, which I always found somewhat ridiculous in the first place. Fruit and vegetables and meat are coming in fresh, again with slightly less selection, but no way could it be considered a hardship. The local hospital (where I worked for many years) is seeing patients more or less as usual, with temperature screening as one enters the premises. No tent on the parking lot. More personal protective equipment in use. Texas has started way too late and has dedicated way to little effort into preventive medical measures. I doubt they can ever catch up. People arriving from Louisiana are required to self quarantine, as mentioned above. Lots of the things the officials are doing now seem to be mainly for show. They are closing the barn door after they cows have escaped and scattered. I am having a new roof put on. Spoke with the contractor an hour ago (Monday morning) and he said everything is still on schedule. They will bring out the new shingles and other materials this afternoon, and will do the actual work tomorrow and the next day if it's not raining. He said he still has adequate labor crews. (Construction is deemed an "essential occupation.") Banks have closed their lobbies, as have most other businesses. Drive-through service is still available for check cashing and deposits. E-banking is less developed in small-town Texas than it is in China. Nobody here wears masks. Hand sanitizer has been sold out for over a month. I still meet people when out and about who want to shake hands. They give me a look when I decline. Happened as recently as yesterday. Republicans and Democrats are squabbling about how to administer a big, headline-grabbing aid package. So the actual grass roots response gets delayed. An ER doctor friend in Atlanta told me last week that during his last shift his hospital had 31 needy candidates for each available ventilator. They are having to do very difficult triage. Despite having written guidelines available, the burden falls on the doctor explaining things to the relatives. Texas Medical Association, of which I am still a member, has prevailed on the legislature to allow retired physicians to return to limited practice, mainly doing telemedicine handling less pressing patient inquiries and concerns. I phoned them and learned that the regulation only applies to physicians who retired 2 years ago or less. I hung up my spurs/stethoscope a decade ago, so unfortunately cannot contribute in that manner. (Probably a good thing since I'm woefully/dangerously out of date.) Yesterday I dug out some Chinese textbooks for review. Also look forward to improving my penmanship/calligraphy.
  19. Some of the incorporated suburbs of Dallas have recently passed a "shelter in place" order that means everyone needs to stay home if they are not going to and from their "essential" jobs or shopping for groceries/prescription pharmaceuticals. Other suburbs nearby have adopted a "libertarian" stance in which they decline to do that because it would infringe citizen rights. It has created a patchwork quilt. The small town in which I live has been a little more relaxed up to now. Many restaurants open for takeout. I have personally found grocery stores to be clean and orderly. They have hired quite a few temporary workers to wipe down the shelves and put up arriving supplies. They no longer have 27 brands of breakfast cereal, which I always found somewhat ridiculous in the first place. Fruit and vegetables and meat are coming in fresh, again with slightly less selection, but no way could it be considered a hardship. The local hospital (where I worked for many years) is seeing patients more or less as usual, with temperature screening as one enters the premises. No tent on the parking lot. More personal protective gear in use. Texas has started way too late and has dedicated way to little effort into preventive medical measures. I doubt they can ever catch up. People arriving from Louisiana are required to self quarantine, as mentioned above. Lots of the things the officials are doing now seem to be mainly for show. They are closing the barn door after they cows have escaped and scattered. I am having a new roof put on. Spoke with the contractor an hour ago (Monday morning) and he said everything is still on schedule. They will bring out the new shingles and other materials this afternoon, and will do the actual work tomorrow and the next day if it's not raining. He said he still has adequate labor crews. (Construction is deemed an "essential occupation.") Banks have closed their lobbies, as have most other businesses. Drive-through service is still available for check cashing and deposits. E-banking is less developed in small-town Texas than it is in China. Nobody here wears masks. Hand sanitizer has been sold out for over a month. I still meet people when out and about who want to shake hands. They give me a look when I decline. Happened as recently as yesterday. Republicans and Democrats are squabbling about how to administer a big, headline-grabbing aid package. So the actual grass roots response gets delayed. An ER doctor friend in Atlanta told me last week that during his last shift his hospital had 31 needy candidates for each available ventilator. They are having to do very difficult triage. Despite having written guidelines available, the burden falls on the doctor explaining things to the relatives. Texas Medical Association, of which I am still a member, has prevailed on the legislature to allow retired physicians to return to limited practice, mainly doing telemedicine handling less pressing patient inquiries and concerns. I phoned them and learned that the regulation only applies to physicians who retired 2 years ago or less. I hung up my spurs/stethoscope a decade ago, so unfortunately cannot contribute in that manner. (Probably a good thing since I'm woefully/dangerously out of date.) MODERATOR: What do you think about splitting these last couple of posts off into a separate thread? One dedicated to Coronavirus response in other countries. Perhaps as compared with China. In fact I will start such a thread and cross-post this item. Thank you.
  20. Background and intro Chapter 3, a little shorter at 8,500 characters. Little bit of a rush today. 1) At the school. Scott and Chen sit through dull speeches at a school. Pay attention to the photograph Chen looks at - the events surrounding the image are very important. We learn that Chen is, unsurprisingly, a member of the Chen clan, if somewhat estranged. Bit of Chen reminiscing about Silicon Isle. 2) We meet 陈贤运, aka 陈董,who's the effective head of the Chen clan. There is a kind-of retired elder who's technically the boss, we'll meet him later. Chen (Kaizong) is, as far as I've read, the most interesting of the characters and it's quite fun watching him awkwardly reconnect with the clan. There's also discussion of the value of the clan system and why it's survived so long, in the context of the US company's offer. There's also a warning to be careful when on the 罗家地盘 and a promise of a visit to the 普度施孤大会 3) Bit of a flashback to a class discussion globalisation and some of Chen's thoughts on his cross-cultural status. 4) 普度施孤大会 - ie, Ghost Festival, and initially compared to Halloween and later a carnival. I like the irony of the ghost money being banned as environmentally unfriendly, and there's some detail on how online banking has reached the spirit world. I also liked "历史是一个对事件去情绪化的过程". But you'd be forgiven for wondering if anything is going to happen... 5) A damsel in distress! Or maybe a bachelor in bother. Where have we seen someone matching this description before? Chen valiantly goes to her aid, gets himself into a potential pickle, and is rescued by 'Uncle' chen. Watch out for 刀仔, who we see more of than we might want to later on, and mention of the Luo clan boss (罗锦城, 罗老板) - why is he so keen to get this particular 垃圾人 back? Chen Kaizong persuades his uncle to shelter... 小米, who is a girl. The final heavily-drawn parallel with the US civil rights movement is a little unnecessary, I'd say. I was particularly slack on vocab with this chapter. 蒙太奇 - montage 聚酰亚胺 - polyimide 丛林社会 - tribal society? Not sure. 莱卡 - lycra, or Leica, but here lycra. 三十的月娘,残咯 - totally didn't get this.
  21. i’m sitting this thing out in new york because there was a time when it seemed safer here than asia 😂 frequent sounds of ambulance sirens flying down empty streets. with regards to Cuomo and the idea of locking down the tri-state area, he said something to the effect of “it’s not who we are” - i.e. infringing on civil liberties or immoral, take your pick... and more importantly that it would be ineffective in controlling the flow of the virus. he said as soon as you declare a quarantine then you have a flood of people leaving the area, as we saw in wuhan, and the virus will spread regardless. better to strongly advise the public to isolate themselves in his opinion. also i saw an earlier post about how he’s on the ropes politically because of all the impending deaths in the state. on the contrary Cuomo is very highly regarded now following a series of press conferences he gave illustrating the problems facing new york and what he’s doing about them. he and Fauci are generally considered to be the only adults left in the room to help americans now. he has become enormously popular in the US overall and if he gets through this without unforeseen downturn he has a good shot at running for president in the future. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eD1eg3vMO2A
  22. It still doesn't matter who started it. Both parties are doing stupid/harmful stuff and both are wrong.
  23. thanks a lot guys!!
  24. Well, if I'm going to do that, I might as well just bite the bullet and order from the States and pay the outrageous shipping charges and possibly get my goods stolen en route. It's such B.S. that China gets to ship its goods to America at a fraction of the cost.
  25. It not the presidents though is it? Its a president, and a foreign ministry spokesperson. A not insignificant difference.
  26. It really, really doesn't matter who started it. It doesn't matter in kindergarten and it doesn't matter when it's the presidents of the two major world powers. Both are clearly in the wrong here.
  27. Imron, in my opinion you have sage status. But my memory is that the first oddball wacky statement was trump called it the virus a Hoax
  1. Load more activity
×
×
  • Create New...