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  1. Today
  2. So, what approach should I use?
  3. mungouk

    oh, my turn: seal script

    No he went to a seal-carving place in Chinatown — he showed me some photos.
  4. Actually, a good possibility is that one of your colleagues is an amateur seal-carver and did this himself for you. So maybe use it when you write your thank-you notes on your return home.
  5. @[email protected] agree with you two: is it an amateur seal. I guess he give you the name of 汉奎之. check the script here: https://www.dullr.com/zhuanke.php
  6. DavyJonesLocker

    Can I apply for a work visa while IN China?

    @Brian US Ok good to know. I think that must be it. I didn't need a police report either . My process was pretty smooth except for my prevous employment history records. The investment bank I worked for has gone bust and further they wanted 10 years of records but in Europe they only keep records 5 years legally. My PhD and university name helped too. I can't see any particular advantage having a category A though, although renewing it was much easier. Didn't do much apart from sign a form. I am told it's a good path to a green card but who knows.
  7. mungouk

    oh, my turn: seal script

    OK so it looks like it's not really a useable name, or a useable seal. Ah well, never mind. Absolutely. Thanks all.
  8. Brian US

    Can I apply for a work visa while IN China?

    @DavyJonesLocker Yeah, mine says A类别, and the agency helping me said that because of this category, I didn't need to leave. This seems to be the difference then if most people need to leave? I work in finance for an American manufacturer, and I think getting paid my US salary is what bumped it up.
  9. Yesterday
  10. Usually there's a relationship between the quality of the sealstone and the quality of the engraving: a first-quality stone deserves a first-quality engraving, etc. Agree this engraving suggests it's probably not a first-quality stone. That it's engraved 阴刻 intaglio not 阳雕 relief is another hint, since intaglio is much easier and quicker to carve than relief. Ditto the choice of 汉 over 漢. If you'd like, post photos of the seal itself and we'll tell you how generous your colleagues were. But it is of course the thought that counts. (And Google 韩奎: you'll see it is a name used in China; works especially well if you're a Hank.)
  11. Tomsima

    oh, my turn: seal script

    That is 之 without a doubt, it is a form specific to 繆篆 which became popular in 漢, forming the most common form of 之 used in all 漢印 style seals. It is usually followed by a 印 or 璽 character. Sorry @mungouk, but I don't mind sticking my neck out and saying your seal is pretty bad, done by someone without much practice. Perhaps they're trying to write 奎之漢 (if you're a man that is), as if to say "Man of...Kui" (?) but they're writing in the wrong direction. Would love it if you could get them to explain it!
  12. Not sure why you can't open that dictionary site. Here're the 之 and 士 extracts:
  13. Jay, it's probable that the necklace and bail are gold-plated at best, in which case the cash value will be as low as other respondents have suggested. However, no jeweller worth his or her salt ever gives a valuation based on only a photograph, and until you do establish the actual gold content you're not going to know for sure how much your necklace is worth. You can find up-to-date bullion pricing here: https://www.cooksongold.com/metalprices/
  14. I wouldn’t get too hung up on it. Unless you know otherwise, this has probably been done by a colleague telling your name to someone at the seal place, who then took a flying guess at what to do with it.
  15. mungouk

    oh, my turn: seal script

    Website is not working for me for some reason. Isn't this character 士?
  16. Yes, rhat's 之: http://dict.iguci.cn/dictionary/dcontent (Can't link direct to inside page, so search 之.)
  17. You probably figured it out already, but for the record: top to bottom and R-L. The simplified 汉 does look weird. Maybe you can start from your name and find the right seal. This is a nice tool: https://www.purpleculture.net/chinese-seal-generator/ (I got a gorgeous seal through them, in case you're tempted)
  18. mungouk

    oh, my turn: seal script

    汉 or 韩 are very close to my English family name. Not sure where 之 comes in? 奎士 is vaguely close phonetically to my English given name, but given it was cooked up by colleagues, I'm not married to it. I'd be happy to choose 韩 as a family name if appropriate, and something more sensible (and not necessarily similar to my given name) as a new Chinese given name. This has suddenly got a bit more complicated than expected 😉
  19. Publius

    oh, my turn: seal script

    It's very weird to see 汉 in seal script. This simplified form of 漢 didn't exist when seal script was dominant. I think the third character is probably 之. Does any of the combinations resemble your Chinese name or the Chinese pronunciation of your English name?
  20. 汉 isn't a usual surname, so it doesn't look quite like a traditional Chinese name. Maybe 韩奎?
  21. mungouk

    oh, my turn: seal script

    Oh, it is Han 汉... I did wonder. How would you assess it as a name? I'm not really sure how 奎士 would be perceived as a given name.
  22. mungouk

    oh, my turn: seal script

    Have I been stitched up by probably well-meaning Singaporeans with a limited grasp of Hanzi?
  23. Please nobody do.
  24. My work colleagues just gave me a seal as a leaving present, but I'm struggling to read the seal script. I think it says 奎士收... is that right? (not sure if seals are read L-R or R-L). If so does this mean they've translated my name to something like crotch - scholar - receive? (!) Somebody please tell me it has a more poetic meaning. 😉
  25. I suggest to write it as in general like 'To whom it may concern'. This will save you the trouble just in case if you want to apply to many universities.
  26. ChTTay

    Chinese chicken curry 咖喱鸡肉

    Pretty sure no opium these days. Not on that level anyway.
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