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  2. studychinese

    Hellotalk app - downloading voice messages.

    That sounds strange. Try hitting refresh in your file explorer. It may be that each individual folder is not refreshed every time you view it.
  3. abcdefg

    Workplace Romance?

    I agree with @Lu. If she's a transplanted village girl, treat her tenderly, don't break her heart. What might be casual to you is probably serious to her.
  4. Looks like it's the title of an online novel? How about translating as "Watch out, babe about"
  5. Lu

    Calling out the polygots

    There is also context. If the Beijing taxi driver asks you 'Do you speak Chinese?' you can say 会 from about A2-B1 level. If the prime minister's interpreter suddenly falls ill during a visit of Xi Jinping and the organiser asks you 'Do you speak Chinese?', you better have C2 level (and amazing interpreter skills) before you say 'Yes'. I think for the question as NinjaTurtle asked it, I assumed the context of a birthday party: the other guest asks you 'Do you speak Chinese?' and you can say 'Yes' from about B1 level. Below that, you say 'just a few words' or 'I'm learning' or something like that.
  6. imron

    Calling out the polygots

    I think both of those require qualifications of "I speak Chinese", e.g. "I speak some Chinese" or "I speak basic Chinese" or similar. For a no qualifications required "I speak Chinese" I think the standard is higher..... and I was about to list what I thought and then I realised here we go down the "what is definition of fluency" rabbit hole, which I'm going to remove myself from before I get any deeper.
  7. 889

    Not what you're not supposed to do here but what you're not supposed to do inside. Makes a difference here.
  8. Publius

    Calling out the polygots

    I'd say B1, the minimum requirement for obtaining a UK work visa. Or HSK5, equivalent to B1 according to the German and French associations of Chinese language teachers.
  9. Lu

    Calling out the polygots

    I'd say B1 level. Far from perfect mastery, but a working knowledge, being able to explain mostly anything as long as both you and the listener are patient.
  10. Lu

    Workplace Romance?

    My take: She doesn't outright dislike you, but doesn't know yet whether she is romantically interested (hence the texting but not carrying the conversation). She does like the attention she is getting from you (hence the teasing). If you are both in China and she is fairly young (under thirty, say), proceed only if you are prepared to marry her. If she is a factory girl from a traditional PRC background, chances are quite high she is of the 'dating with intent to marry' school. If you're just looking for a little fun, step away and look elsewhere.
  11. Eyoel and Ampicillin, I hope you can help each other! But if you can, please post it here, because Ampicillin is quite right: Information on universities from people who are studying there (or have studied there) is extremely useful to many other people who consider going there.
  12. Flickserve

    HelloTalk language exchange app

    I have a very irregular schedule. Even 24h advance booking is tricky. I have missed more than a few lessons.
  13. mungouk

    Politics and other topics

    On the vocab side, googling mandarin politics vocabulary brings up quite a few lists. Medicine might be a bit less successful. As @Luxi pointed out a few months back, one of the handy tools PurpleCulture have on their site is annotated daily news. The articles are of variable length and a bit like The Chairman's Bao, except they're free and not graded. It looks like they're pulling them from a newsfeed somewhere and processing them automatically, rather than curating them, but might be worth a look.
  14. @Ampicillin ok give me your wechat account
  15. studychinese

    HelloTalk language exchange app

    I think I have mentioned it on this thread, but italki teachers are the way to go. If you just want conversation practice rather than a lesson plan you can just use the community tutors for as little as $5 USD an hour, which is well within the reach of almost everyone here. Even if I can find a language exchange partner that will do 50/50 I often find it stressful to help them. I've been in bizarre situations where someone is treating me like a living dictionary, giving me a list of words to translate into English. They would be better served using a dictionary. Dealing with idiosyncrasies of random people on the internet can be a real hassle.
  16. mungouk

    HelloTalk language exchange app

    Absolutely! I have a fabulous teacher on italki. Worth every penny.
  17. 歪果仁

    HelloTalk language exchange app

    “Just to clarify: you don't actually need to pay for language exchange on italki... just find/friend someone and arrange to Skype or whatever.“ it it is free to find language partners but you have to pay for lessons or tutoring, which I recommend by the way.
  18. imron

    Politics and other topics

    There was a post the other day that mentioned the American Mandarin Society's Podcast, which seems to have a reasonable amount of politics related content, however looking at the content now it seems they only post very rarely and irregularly. It's not intermediate level however and I expect you won't have much luck finding content at that level except through graded newspaper content such as the chairman's bao and similar.
  19. abcdefg

    Workplace Romance?

    Approximate age and location? Welcome to the forum.
  20. I don't think these will be teabags at all. These are usually balls of several kinds of flowers tied together and compressed so that they expand in a pot of hot water, resembling a blooming flower in the process. The general name for these is 开花茶 kaihua cha, and they usually don't actually contain tea 茶叶 (by which I mean processed leaves of the camelia sinensis plant.) Chinese use the term "tea" 茶 rather loosely, and apply it to flower infusions as well as to actual tea leaf decoctions. All this is not to say these balls won't produce a beautiful and tasty infusion. Just trying to align your expectations with reality. The resulting liquid won't look or taste like "tea" as it is known in the west. These work best in a clear glass teapot because that way you can best appreciate the show. I have given some to friends back in the US when I've returned for holidays. Always have to "demo" them, since otherwise they are lost regardless of how carefully I supply written instructions. I wouldn't worry too much (or better said, I wouldn't worry at all) about what kind of flower is which unless you are a botanist. Just unwrap one and put it into very hot (not quite boiling) water in a teapot and wait until the flower opens. After that, pour some into cups and enjoy the experience. These do not need added sugar. None need added lemon or milk. Chinese drink these beverages plain. Even though yours appear to be vacuum wrapped in foil pouches, they won't keep too long. Best to use them within a year of purchase. After that the contents may just crumble when reconstituted. So these are not something to "lay up" for several years. Congratulations on your purchase! Hope everyone enjoys them! And welcome to the forum. If you would like to read about more usual kinds of Chinese tea, how to select and prepare them, I'd invite you to have a look at this index file of tea articles: https://www.chinese-forums.com/forums/topic/54133-tea-articles-a-users-guide/
  21. 歐博思

    Politics and other topics

    锵锵三人行 probably would've covered your political requirement. I think it's off the air now, though, maybe because they covered it too well 😂. Maybe you could find some old ones.
  22. abcdefg

    Chinese cola chicken wings 可乐鸡翅

    Must admit that, like you, I never think of Coke as "health food." Afraid it would be pretty uninteresting that way, @Shelley, sorry to say. A nice Cantonese poached chicken might be more to your liking. Some Guangdong/Hong Kong recipes do a great job with that and I enjoy eating chicken that way when visiting those areas. The basic 鸡肉饭 found in so many small street-side lunch rooms at noon for 10 or 12 Yuan is basically steamed or poached chicken, dipping sauce optional, served with plain steamed rice and a few bites of a plain boiled green vegetable, often 菜心 (a relative of cabbage and broccoli.) Guangdong cooking 粤菜 excels at bringing out pleasant flavors in the main ingredients without layering on too much in the way of extra tastes. They don't want to see the original flavors get lost. Often these dishes are bland 清淡, although delicious in their own way. ("Bland" when applied to things like this is a compliment, not a criticism." Teochew cuisine 潮州菜 (also called Chiuchao cuisine) as found in Chaozhou and Shantou (Eastern Guangdong, up near Fujian) also prides itself on applying a very light touch to extremely fresh and flavorful ingredients, in particular just-caught ocean fish. It's a delicate cuisine. Their mastery of poaching and steaming is legendary. But much mainstream Chinese cooking, generally speaking, considers chicken meat as somewhat pretty boring and the different cooking approaches try to give it some sparkle, try to imbue it with attractive combinations of "imported" flavor. That's the way it's usually treated in the culinary traditions of Sichuan, Hunan, Yunnan, and Guizhou. They tend to turn the chicken meat into "carriers" or "vehicles" for other more lively flavors. Some other fowl are more highly thought of and get different treatments in China: pigeon 鸽子, duck 鸭子, goose 鹅子 and so on. Every Cantonese restaurant I've ever visited, for example, affords roast squab a place of honor. (Footnote: I realize some of these chicken comments are controversial.)
  23. mungouk

    HelloTalk language exchange app

    Just to clarify: you don't actually need to pay for language exchange on italki... just find/friend someone and arrange to Skype or whatever.
  24. @Abmens If you applying for Ph.D publication can be from anywhere in the world. If you sending proposal then your area of research should be in China and you must do your research in China but you will get certain days exemption if your study requires you to travel and your prof. will assist you. When it comes to scholarship you must be in China that’s the scholarship law but you get certain days official holidays per year. Good luck.
  25. You are welcome bro. You can ask me your doubts. It’s better if you PM or Wechat me. You can post your questions here as well so that it may help other people as well but I don’t come here often and might give you delayed response. Lately been busy with the projects. Good luck.
  26. Looking forward to hearing what you have to say.
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