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jhargett

Pronunciation of "这个"

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jhargett

I have seen pinyin that said zheige and zhege. I read a post on here that said zheige was slang or perhaps a contraction for zhe yi ge and that it wouldn't be used it print. However, I have seen it written as zheige in a respectable journal that takes care when translating. Is it different in Taiwan than in Mainland maybe? Which one is correct?

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889

According to my standard Mainland dictionary, "zhei4" is often used before measure words and numeric measures, so you may hear "Zhei ben shu shi wode." But the same dictionary shows "this one" as "zhe4ge" when I'd normally say "zhei4ge." In any event, if I were romanising text I'd simply follow the pronunciation actually used in that context by an educated native speaker of Putonghua.

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skylee
I have seen pinyin that said zheige and zhege. I read a post on here that said zheige was slang or perhaps a contraction for zhe yi ge and that it wouldn't be used it print.

In print it is "這個". Personally I pronounce it as zheige when I want to emphasize it, otherwise it is zhege.

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beijingbooty

People in beijing and the northern part of china use "zheige". (zhayge)

Other Chinese will generally say "zhege" with more of an "r" sound "zhe®ge. This is perhaps the more standard version.

Whilst Beijing mandarin is commonly said to be the norm, you have to take into account that they have strong accents that you will not find in many other mandarin speaking areas.

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Quest
People in beijing and the northern part of china use "zheige". (zhayge)

Other Chinese will generally say "zhege" with more of an "r" sound "zhe®ge.

Not true, people use zheige (zhe yi ge) everywhere.

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smithsgj

If 這個 zheige is a contraction of zhe-yi-ge

then 那個, as a contraction of na-yi-ge, would sound like nai-ge ("nye-ger").

But it doesn't; it sounds like nei-ge, which rhymes exactly with zhei-ge

So the characters 那 and 這 have 'nei' and 'zhei' readings available, and it's not a case of contraction.

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39degN
If 這個 zheige is a contraction of zhe-yi-ge

then 那個' date=' as a contraction of na-yi-ge, would sound like nai-ge ("nye-ger").

But it doesn't; it sounds like nei-ge, which rhymes exactly with zhei-ge

So the characters 那 and 這 have 'nei' and 'zhei' readings available, and it's not a case of contraction.[/quote']

i believe 這個 is from 这一个, 那個is from 那一个, becoz you can't explain slang through logical reasoning on standard pronounciation, just like the want to = wanna

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chris.

My chinese teacher from beijing never mentioned zheige, and my exercise book it has zhe ben shi shi ta de. I have never encountered zheige in pin yin, i have been learning mandarin for about 7 months or so.

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skylee

chris., if you use pinyin input method to type Chinese characters, try input "zhei". There is only one character with this pronunciation, and it is "這/这" (this is more convenient than inputting "zhe").

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smithsgj

But it doesn't work on my machine (Taiwan XP) :(

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skylee

So maybe it depends on the software. Sorry.

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chris.

Thanks for pointing that out skylee, will make my chinese typing faster ;)

By the way I'm using microsoft global IME 5. something, zhei is understood by it.

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nnt
But it doesn't work on my machine (Taiwan XP) :(

If it's Windows Xp, just add another IME using

控制台-> 地區選項 and add any 輸入法 (IME) you want, including PRC Pinyin (and Hindi 8) ).

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Lu

My yubar (from Shenyang) told me zheige is more kouyu, and zhege is when you read aloud something written.

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jhargett

If "zhege" was always used when reading something, "zheige" would not be in pinyin. So it has to be acceptable somewhere to read "zheige". I'm just wondering if it is standard or not. However, I am beginning to understand that when you talk about Chinese, finding a "standard" can be difficult. Thank you everyone for your responses. Please continue to post if anyone has something to add.

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geoffkhan
My chinese teacher from beijing never mentioned zheige, and my exercise book it has zhe ben shi shi ta de. I have never encountered zheige in pin yin, i have been learning mandarin for about 7 months or so.

"Zhe ben shu shi ta de."

Sounds like my old chinese workbook, volume 1 or 2, I forget.

:)

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hilshire1

Looks like John De Francis's "Begining Chinese Reader", the one I've been strugling with for months. Said both were valid, but never gave any explanation why. :?

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xxdnbd

Em...

Both are right. We often use "zheige" when we are talking to others. But "zhege" is more formal.

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geek_frappa

just a quick note for those who are curious. in NJStar,

zhege 這個 , not ZHEIGE

naer 哪兒 or 那兒, not NAR

kuaier 塊兒, not KUAIR

etc...

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