Jump to content
Chinese-forums.com
Learn Chinese in China

Most easily mistaken Chinese character


Recommended Posts

Site Sponsors:
Pleco for iPhone / Android iPhone & Android Chinese dictionary: camera & hand- writing input, flashcards, audio.
Study Chinese in Kunming 1-1 classes, qualified teachers and unique teaching methods in the Spring City.
Learn Chinese Characters Learn 2289 Chinese Characters in 90 Days with a Unique Flash Card System.
Hacking Chinese Tips and strategies for how to learn Chinese more efficiently
Popup Chinese Translator Understand Chinese inside any Windows application, website or PDF.
Chinese Grammar Wiki All Chinese grammar, organised by level, all in one place.

  • 7 years later...

It took me one whole year to realise that was not like + a 捺 stroke. Or that 's right-bottom part was different from

Link to post
Share on other sites

As the thread's been dug up anyway...

茶 (cha2) and 荼 (tu2). Hard to tell apart if you don't see them together.

Link to post
Share on other sites
skylee

I think 荼 is usually only used in 荼靡 or 荼毒.

Another similar pair is 余 and 佘, both are surnames.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 4 weeks later...

I kept misreading 髁 for 踝 the other day when both characters were popping up in a section of a book on skeletal muscles. At first I convinced myself it made sense...and then the more I thought of it, I knew I had made a mistake. I then learned the character 髁 and not to read in moving vehicles without glasses.... :wall

踝 huái​

髁 kē​

Link to post
Share on other sites
WestTexas

personally I get 慌、惶、and 恍 confused because they are all the same radical and the phonetic components all rhyme

Link to post
Share on other sites

What's up with these old threads popping up? Well they're interesting so...

The most easily mistaken character(s) are definitely 日 and 曰. Why? Because almost everybody who can write Chinese does not know the (being a prescriptivist here but...) real difference between them. And those reading this are most likely going "wtf is he talking about?" It's further confounded by the recent typefaces which describe the newly emerging way(s) of differentiating them, which might have something to do with their shape or the length of the middle horizontal stroke.

The difference between 日 and 曰, in 楷書, is that the first two strokes touch in 日 and do not touch in 曰. That's it. The shape doesn't matter.

In 行書, it is the shape, where 日 is obviously narrow (either that or the first two strokes definitely touch) and 曰 is obviously wide.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Recently, for me it's been anything with 呂/? [can't type that second part, it's like a vertical stacked 口丨口.]

宮/官 is the absolute worst for me; depending on the font they can look pretty much identical, and they are often used in similar ways.

营/菅is bad for me as well, although I just noticed that 营 doesn't have the dot connecting the two boxes (at least in the font I'm using), unlike 宮. [Note that the traditional form of 营 is 營, which avoids the visual ambiguity; checking, there doesn't seem to be a character with the two 火 on top and 官 on the bottom, although I could have missed it.]

EDIT: 菅 not the character I'm looking for..... What was it again? Right, 管. Oooh, never noticed that 管 and 营 have different radicals on top, now that I (finally!!) noticed that it should be easier to distinguish.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

how about these:

耒 vs. 来,未,末

于 vs. 干

监 vs. 临

戈 vs. 弋

代 vs. 伐

崇 vs. 祟

候 vs. 侯

狠 vs. 狼

奖 vs. 浆

权 vs. 杈

折 vs. 拆

浙 vs. 淅

呜 vs. 鸣

脊 vs. 背

署 vs 暑

Link to post
Share on other sites
Are we allowed to compared simplified vs traditional?

It could get technical. Anyone feel like telling the difference(s) between Simplified and Traditional ? Nah bad example. 起.

Link to post
Share on other sites
The most easily mistaken character(s) are definitely 日 and 曰....It's further confounded by the recent typefaces which describe the newly emerging way(s) of differentiating them' date=' which might have something to do with their shape or the length of the middle horizontal stroke.[/quote']The "recent typefaces" you refer to date back at least to the Ming Dynasty. I've got some reproductions of Wanli-era block texts (楷体 naturally), in which the difference between 日 and 曰 is (1) the overall width, and (2) the middle stroke of 曰 ends before the right wall. (I've seen scans of the handwritten Yongle Encyclopedia that show this same distinction). And if you look at scans of the Siku Quanshu, you can find that different scribes observed different distinctions -- some used unattached top strokes, others used a wide trapezoidal shape with a tiny mid-stroke.
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

OK, I take back calling it "recent." I've only been looking at 唐楷 or earlier, and I thought it was a Republican or Qing thing, because scans of the 康熙字典 differentiate them by the first two strokes.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and select your username and password later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Click here to reply. Select text to quote.

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...