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Koneko

Input Chinese punctuation marks (PC & Mac)

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Koneko

Dear All,

Please can you teach me how to input the following Chinese punctuation marks (PC & Mac),

Enumeration comma 顿号

Middle dot 间隔号

Dash 破折号

I normally use comma (,) for the enumeration comma; full stop (.) for the middle dot; and six minus signs for the dash (------)

I learnt from a similar thread posted by kaox0018 on 8 December 2006 that you could input the enumeration comma by hitting the backslash () key for PC. Well, I've tried this on my PC but it didn't work. :conf

Do you know how can I overcome this problem? :help

Many thanks!

K.

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imron

If you are using open punctuation mode in most PC Chinese input methods,

. produces 。

, produces ,

produces 、

shift-2 produces ·

(for windows input methods, typing ctrl-. usually toggles between open/closed punctuation)

It's slightly different on a Mac where,

/ produces 、

also usually, the —— is produced by typing _ (the underscore character), and shift-6 produces ……

Because each input method might be slightly different though, a good idea is to just open up notepad, switch to open punctuation mode and then type all the punctuation keys (and then type them all again, while holding shift). This is the easiest way to find out what keys do what.

On the PC it's important to make sure you are using open punctuation, otherwise the punctuation marks will be the same as they are on the normal US/UK keyboard.

Most Chinese input methods on the Mac (or at least the ones I've used) always seem to use open punctuation all the time.

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tai4ji2x

on windows, microsoft word, using the XP built-in IME, it doesn't seem to work when using traditional character input, whereas it works fine for simplified.

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ipsi()

Should work fine with traditional - it does on my English Windows XP. If it doesn't, try ctrl + . to change it. Otherwise, have a look at the IME bar, and see if the punctuation marks look like ., or 。,. If it's the second, everything should work. If it's not, click on it.

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tai4ji2x

well, i have it at chinese (taiwan), and when i press "ctrl-period", nothing changes. if it means anything, the language bar with chinese (prc) does include a "punctuation" option, whereas for chinese (taiwan), i have: "microsoft new phonetic IME 2000a", "Chinese", "half shape", and "tools".

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hoshinoumi

I read this topic but still couldn't type the Chinese comma. If your keyboard has a ç, try hitting the ç while in Chinese typing mode. It worked for me.

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Psi-Lord

I’ve always wondered whether there’s a way to type a fullwidth interpunct proper () instead of the halfwidth one (· or ‧) you get on Windows (and which I’ve always disliked, despite apparently being the de facto norm).

 

From Wikipedia:

 

Quote

The partition sign (Unicode code point U+2027, Hyphenation Point) […] is properly (and in Taiwan formally) a full-width punctuation mark, although sometimes narrower forms are substituted for aesthetic reasons. In particular, the regular interpunct is more commonly used as a computer input, although Chinese-language fonts typically render this as full width.

 

 

Of course, this might be just me being too precious about it…

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