Jump to content
Chinese-forums.com
Learn Chinese in China

Huang Jialuo

Tsinghua: Application Fee + other stuff

Recommended Posts

Huang Jialuo

Hi,

Is anybody else applying to Tsinghua University?

I would like to know if the application fee is paid before or after sending the application form (registration period?)?

Also, what if my high school records are in spanish? Can they still read them? Do I need to do something?

Please help.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Site Sponsors:
Pleco for iPhone / Android iPhone & Android Chinese dictionary: camera & hand- writing input, flashcards, audio.
Study Chinese in Kunming 1-1 classes, qualified teachers and unique teaching methods in the Spring City.
Learn Chinese Characters Learn 2289 Chinese Characters in 90 Days with a Unique Flash Card System.
Hacking Chinese Tips and strategies for how to learn Chinese more efficiently
Popup Chinese Translator Understand Chinese inside any Windows application, website or PDF.
Chinese Grammar Wiki All Chinese grammar, organised by level, all in one place.

Jamoldo

try to get the documents translated and paperclip them to the original in Spanish. The most important thing is to have all of the documents they request and (as said by AdrianLondon in other posts), make sure all the info is filled out, even if it's a half truth/white lie. They just need it for red tape stuff.

Actually the most important thing I think is that you give them the application fee (IN CASH). If you can't get access to RMB (I could not last year from where I was in the US), give them the equivalent in USD and they'll accept it...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
adrianlondon

As Tsinghua is a bit posh, you might need to send notarized (is that the word? where they stamp it to say it's official) translations of all your Spanish stuff into English (or Mandarin!).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Huang Jialuo

Hi thanks. The 'translating the documents' part may be kind of hard, but I will try to do it. I am going to my old school tomorrow to find out. Translate it to English, right? Because to Chinese I think it may be impossible during this current situation.

You say every detail has to be filled out.

When I called the other day to Tsinghua, the guy told me that if I was older than 18, I didn't need a Guarantor. Is this actually true? I mean: do I have to find a guarantor?

About the application fee, does it need to be paid before sending the application and documents, or afterwards is ok? I mean afterwards, when I am in China in September.

What about filling in the Application Form: some parts in Chinese and few parts in English?

I am currently involved in a University in Peru, and they have a foreign exchange program, but I don't want to go with them (besides they didn't advise on time). Anyway, that would make my Occupation (Student), but I am concerned for the word "Affiliated", because I am not affiliated to no one in this excursion. I am going on my own, directly to the University. You know what I mean?

Highest Academic Degree obtained: I guess it is the IB program, but I don't know if to put High School Diploma instead, since they request full academic records, etc.

Also, I am confused by the part "Never learned Chinese?". If it said "Ever learned Chinese?", fine no problem, I would answer Yes.

But since it says "Never learned Chinese?", I am not sure whether to put Yes or No, since I am not sure how they will understand my answer. Maybe as YES, I HAVE NEVER LEARNED CHINESE, or as NO, I HAVE NEVER LEARNED CHINESE.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Huang Jialuo

Also, complementing my not yet posted reply:

"Chinese Language students

Tsinghua University Application Form of Foreign Students (Ok)

Last schooling certificate and schooling records (Does this mean a Diploma stating that I graduated from High School and schooling records of High School (or also Elementary school)

A copy of the applicant’s passport with photo page (Does this mean a photocopy of ALL the pages in the passport, or just a photocopy of the information page in which you can find the photo, mi name, date of birth, birthplace, etc?)

The certificates provided should be the original documents in Chinese or in English, otherwise notarized translations in Chinese or English are required. (Ok, it is exactly what you said adrianlondon, thanks)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
adrianlondon

gosh - you ask a lot of questions about an application form ;) ok, let's go ..

Application fee is needed WITH THE APPLICATION. They won't book you a place on the course without it. Some places accept bank transfer, but the cost of that for the small fee (it'll be about 60USD right?) isn't worth it. Just bundle some cash in there, or make friends with someone in Beijing quick and ask them to pay for you (that's what I did!).

Photocopy of passport - just as it says - just the photo page with the information on it. They hardly want to see blank pages or are interested in where you've been on holiday recently ;)

If they say you don't need a guarantor then don't give one. Most people applying to BNU (where I studied) left that blank. It's for under 18's really. I made up a name and address on my form. I don't like gaps on application forms. Probably spent too long filling in tax forms where if I don't write "N/A" in the box their computer systems break down and I get phoned.

Filling in the form ... do it all in English; no point in writing some of it in Mandarin. Maybe you'll get it wrong ;) Depends how good your Mandarin level is compared to your English level I suppose.

As for your certificates being translated into English ... Universities in the US and Europe might well require that too, so I'm sure your Uni is geared up to doing this kind of translation.

I love the "never learnt Chinese?" question. Stupid Tsinghua. I wonder how good their teaching is ... this type of negative question confuses the heck out of Chinese people. The correct answer is probably "NO. I have learnt Chinese before". Or forget the "NO" bit; it'll confuse them whether you write "yes" or "no". :)

If it said "Ever learned Chinese?", fine no problem, I would answer Yes

YES, I HAVE NEVER LEARNED CHINESE

However ... you then got confused yourself. Have you learnt Chinese before or not?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Huang Jialuo

Yes, I have learned Chinese before and I still learn it. My problem with the question was solely on the way that they would understand it. I was thinking that either way, could mean either way to any of them, haha. So, I guess I might as well get someone to write me a guarantee letter saying I have studied before, attached with all the other documents.

Really hope that works.

About the rest, thanks for your help.

However I still am not sure about the application fee. Let's say I send the application form today. What about the application fee? I mean, Tsinghua doesn't specify any banks. And how do you meet someone in Beijing in a legit way? Or at least, a way I know they will say "Yes, no problem" and mean it.

Even if I do get to pay it on time, what guarantees they will make the correct association with my application form? Will they look for it at least? Can I send money by DHL? :P

I was thinking that if I get to find out the associated bank of Tsinghua, I could transfer the $60 or whatever and get a receipt from my bank; a receipt which I can send to the university in a courier service.

Man, I know.. I always make more problems than there should be. I mean I obsessively try to control every variable, to avoid any reason for rejection (from the University); so obsessively that I consider the worst in the most extreme situations.

Sorry if I bugged any of you, not what I wanted. I just wouldn't want to be rejected for a single mistake.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
imron
Let's say I send the application form today. What about the application fee?
In the same envelope you use to send your application form and all the relevant materials, include another smaller envelope that contains the application fee in cash.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Huang Jialuo

Wait.. can that be done?! I mean, you have just blown away my entire belief system. I have always believed that money could not be sent by mail. I didn't know why, but I thought it kind of reasonable.

Is it really (legally) possible? Or is it only good when you are not caught?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
adrianlondon

In China, there's legal and there's "legal".

Bung the cash in an envelope along with your application form. Or, ring them, and ask them for their bank details bearing in mind it'll probably cost you a load in transfer fees.

Yes, sending cash is dodgy. Yes, sending ANYTHING in China is dodgy, but ... until the postal service realises it can retire just by opening up everyone's application to Tsinghua, Beida, BLCU and BNU, then ... it seems to work. Most people send cash.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
imron

Not sending cash is the mail is mostly for your own protection (if the mail gets opened/lost, then your money is gone). It also prevents less than scrupulous employees at the company you're sending money to from pocketing your money when they open your letter and pretending that there was no money in the envelope. If this happens, then you're basically screwed, because it becomes your word against theirs. If you're prepared to assume that risk, then fine. Most application fees to Chinese universities seem to get paid this way.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
adrianlondon

If you think that's weird, wait til you get there and you have to pay for your semester's tuition. Up front. In cash. At least, that's all BNU accepted.

During the registration day they had, literally, boxes full of 100y notes which security guards would seal up and take out on a regular basis.

"China is a developing country."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jamoldo

The cash will get there but it's technically against the law or something. I remember getting the super expensive/secure/express postage at the post office in the US when I was sending my application. The postal employee was trying to be helpful and was telling me not to waste money, and that regular express post would have the same results, but then I made the mistake of telling him there was cash in the envelope and I needed it to be secure. He told me it was technically against the law, and I had to tell him that BNU only accepted cash as the application fee. He just smiled and said, "I didn't hear anything" and sent the application on it's way.

Adrian is spot on about BNU. It's like a treasure chest you would see in a pirate movie.. Just filled with 100 RMB notes. I sitll remember going to the bank and making a huge cash advance.. Wait I did it this semester too...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Huang Jialuo

So then I guess it is only natural then that I send my application fee payment in the same mail as the other stuff. I am thinking of using DHL, as it is one of the fastest courier services I am aware of, and after checking their details in their webpage, I am almost certain they don't mention any problems about sending money in the parcel, as long as there are no "human remains" in it also (that is one of the items they prohibit).

I hope they (the application people in China) don't steal the money. I mean, it is really not that much, but it could end up losing me a place in their program. It seems highly unlikely that they do it though, because you say it is the most common way in which they receive the application fee money.

Thanks for the help.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
sandeehoo

I heard from someone :wink: who has just received their offer from tsinghua that they do not have to send in any application fee with their application form.

Apparantly, Tsinghua will accept your application even without the fee attached. Tsinghua gives students the option of paying the application fee during the registration stage once you get to China.

It would be good if someone could verify this :wink: so as to save prospective students a lot of worries and confusion.

It's kind of annoying that the Tsinghua website for international students mentions nothing about the when/how to pay the application fee :x

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Andy^|

Tsinghua accepts an applications without the fee attached.

although I did call in advance and sent a letter with the application explaining that I will pay the application fee when I register.

not sure if you have to do all that but it worked for me :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Qcash3

Also I don't think that you have to pay the tuition fees in cash when you register at Tsinghua, if my memory serves me correctly during our registration period last year they allowed you to swipe a debit or credit card. Although, my memory may not be serving me correctly. :help

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
applepie42

Qcash is correct, they do accept debit cards and credit cards, but there is a 3% surcharge. There is no charge, however, if the debit card is from a bank in China.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and select your username and password later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Click here to reply. Select text to quote.

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...