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Ancient Chinese Architecture


shibo77
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I enjoy architecture a lot. But I am always saddened by the fact that most ancient architecture of China did not survive. With good reason too, as the wooden pillars cannot stand the test of time. But I am really interested in ancient architecture of China. I tried to find a few websites about this, but nothing appears before Tang. The Epanggong, Weiyanggong, are there any recreations anywhere? How about the Song dynasty and Tang dynasty? Where are all the palaces, temples from the Three Kingdoms, Han, Qin, Zhou, Shang? I would appreciate any information. Thanks! 多谢!

- Shibo :help

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we can get some idea of Han architecture by looking at models found in tombs - small scale house, farm buildings etc for the deceased to use in the afterlife. I think the idea here is that these show that Han dynasty builders were using techniques still in use until very recently.; the basic shape of the buildings doesn't change very much.

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多谢! Thanks a bunch! The link was nicely designed. There are so many in Yunan. I really need to travel there sometime. I know of using the models in Han graves to reconstruct a view of how architecture then looked. But it seems that scholarly work on the subject seems to be more advanced. Have you travelled to a place in 北京郊区 the suburban areas of Beijing. 北普陀电影城 Bei2 Pu3 Tuo2 Dian1 Ying3 Cheng2, they have some very beautifully designed palaces representing the architectural style of each dynasty. Han, Tang, Song are all I remember. They film movies and television dramas using these buildings. I'm sure the buildings were designed with much scholarly work done.

- Shibo :D

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  • 2 weeks later...

As I remember, Chilin Nunnery (志蓮靜苑) was constructed with a reference to some architecture in Nara of Japan, which was once the capital and still preserves a large range of ancient Chinese architectures.

Old Chinese architectures seldom survives to this day not because they were made by wood, it was because the mentality of the new conquerors (most are Han Chinese themselves), who thought demolishing was the only way to let you forget the past, the Qianchao~ (previous dynasty).

I shouldn't use past tense if you know what I mean.

See what's Beijing now. Mao Zedong's sense of "architecture" was a full view of chimneys from Tian'anmen Square.

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Forget Yunnan or Xi'an; if you're into ancient architecture, get your butt to Shanxi Province. There, you'll find the two oldest wooden halls remaining in China, both dating to the T'ang: Nanchan Si near the town of Dong Ye and Foguang Si near the town of Dou Cun. You'll also find the Yingxian Mu Ta in Yingxian, the oldest wooden pagoda in China dating to the Liao. In Datong, you'll find Huayan Si with a hall dated to the Liao, and Shanhua Si with a hall dated to the Jin. In Taiyuan you'll find Jin Ci, a heavily rebuilt complex that nevertheless has a hall dating to the Song. Much more modern, but still impressive are the trio of Qing Dynasty manor homes: the Qiao Jia Da Yuan, the Wang Jia Da Yuan, and the Cao Jia Da Yuan. If you're a Guan Yu fan, then there's his ancestral temple outside Yuncheng, dated to the Jin but all Ming and Qing now. There are loads of other temples and pagodas of varying dates, and that's not even getting into art: Buddhist sculpture from the Wei through the Jin, paintings and frescoes from the T'ang, Song and Yuan, etc. etc.

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Foguang Si

%E4%BD%9B%E5%85%89%E5%AF%BA.jpg

Nanchan Si

nanchan.gif

Hualin Si (From Song dynasty, it is the oldest surviving wooden structure in Southern China. Its architectural style later brought to Japan and heavily influenced the reconstructed Dongdaji Temple which is the largest wooden building in the world).

141.jpg

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i have been to todaiji in japan and i dont think its the biggest wooden construction in the world. places like main building in the palace museum, the main hall of yonghe temple in beijing or the main hall of du'le temple(which housed a 16m tall wooden statue) in ji county, near tianjin, all seems to be larger than the main hall of todaiji.

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What's everyones' favourite period architecture? Mine is that of the Tang. There's just something about the style that makes it extremely elegant! :D

Another thing I like about this kind of architecture is the 'horns' on the roof. Looking at it from a low angle from the front feels as if the building is alive looking down at you.

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