Jump to content
Chinese-forums.com
Learn Chinese in China

  • Why you should look around

    Since 2003, Chinese-forums.com has been helping people learn Chinese faster and get to China sooner. Our members can recommend beginner textbooks, help you out with obscure classical vocabulary, and tell you where to get the best street food in Xi'an. And we're friendly about it too. 

    Have a look at what's going on, or search for something specific. We hope you'll join us. 
mvk20

Stroke order practice website

Recommended Posts

mvk20

Sometime over the last 2 weeks I stumbled across a site where you could test your knowledge of stroke order by looking at a character and clicking on the strokes as you should write them in order, one by one, and it would stop you if you went in the wrong order. I stupidly did not bookmark this site :roll:. Does anyone here happen to know off the top of your head where that site is? I spent a good amount of time trying to find it today to no avail. Thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Site Sponsors:
Pleco for iPhone / Android iPhone & Android Chinese dictionary: camera & hand- writing input, flashcards, audio.
Study Chinese in Kunming 1-1 classes, qualified teachers and unique teaching methods in the Spring City.
Learn Chinese Characters Learn 2289 Chinese Characters in 90 Days with a Unique Flash Card System.
Hacking Chinese Tips and strategies for how to learn Chinese more efficiently
Popup Chinese Translator Understand Chinese inside any Windows application, website or PDF.
Chinese Grammar Wiki All Chinese grammar, organised by level, all in one place.

trien27
Also note that this is the traditional Traditional stroke order, e.g. 學 starts with 爻 and 我 ends with 丿.

Well, 學 does start with 爻, but 我 does NOT end in 丿! 我 ends with the dot on top. Not if you're writing in Kaishu or standard script. It would end in the 丿if you used grass script or caoshu.

Hoffman, the website that you posted is from Wikipedia. I'd use it with a grain of salt. The stroke order for the character at the website, the traditional stroke order of the character is wrong because it's not the Kaishu stroke order, but rather the Caoshu stroke order. The so-called Mainland stroke order is not just used in Mainland China, but rather the Kaishu stroke order. The so-called Traditional stroke order is the Caoshu stroke order.

I'm sorry, but Imron, you're wrong. It has nothing to do with the direction in which characters are written. When characters were printed top to bottom, or from right to left, or left to right, they were written the same way. The stroke order only differ due to the writing style: da-zhuan[large seal script], xiao-zhuan[small seal script], jiaguwen [bone & shell writing], caoshu [grass script], kaishu [standard script], lishu [clerical script], xingshu [running script], etc... Please read what I've posted. Thank you.

Edited by trien27

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
imron
but 我 does NOT end in 丿! 我 ends with the dot on top.
It does in the modern way of writing that accommodates writing from left to write. However, traditionally, (i.e. back when Chinese was written top to bottom), 丿 was the final stroke.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
imron
the website that you posted is from Wikipedia. I'd use it with a grain of salt.
trien27, first of all, please reply to posts rather than just editing your original post to contain answers to questions raised later on. It makes the thread difficult to follow otherwise. Second of all, I do take Wikipedia with a grain of salt, and would be quite happy to be shown wrong if you can show me some more authoritative source. Just saying it is so isn't enough, as I take what you say with an even larger grain of salt than I do Wikipedia.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
roddy

And statements like "Please read what I've posted. Thank you. " are best placed at the start.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hofmann

Uhh...what?

Yes, Wikipedia should be taken with a grain of salt, but if anyone found a scholarly source that contradicted what is written on Wikipedia, they'd be on it in a second. It's not like they freely post whatever they want. If you find something that would contradict Wikipedia, then they would be happy to hear from you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
mvk20

Thanks for the replies - actually that Taiwanese MOE site isn't the one I had seen before. The one I was looking for was definitely geared towards English speaking learners of Chinese and was very straight-forward - you would just click on one of the strokes and it would let you know if you were doing them in the right order or not. Anyone know of another site that might be the one I'm thinking of? Thanks again.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
mvk20

Elf Piper - you know what, I think that's it! Thanks! I guess that's kind of a shame that you can only do it for the characters in the 22 lessons - I wonder if there's a site that lets you do something similar for a wider array of characters...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
david808

How many people are interested in this feature? If you are, you can either post it back here or drop a note to [email protected]. We will be glad to add this feature to Arch Chinese, http://www.archchinese.com, which covers more than 5000 commonly used characters.

Thanks

Edited by david808

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
trien27
我 ends with 丿
It does in the modern way of writing that accommodates writing from left to write. However, traditionally, (i.e. back when Chinese was written top to bottom), 丿 was the final stroke.

Can someone go to this website and check the proper stroke order for 我? It's the first character on row18: http://www.bluetec.com.cn/asp/mymandarin/bishun/bishun.htm

Clicking on the character shows you the PROPER stroke order.

I found this at the following website - http://www.hhmz.cn/?6885/viewspace-20520.html:

我,最后一笔竟然是右上方的点,而不是右下脚的撇!
The font is too big and over to the right side, so in order to read everything, you need to decrease the font size on the page. Edited by trien27
missing information

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hofmann

trien27,

Oh, yes, very scholarly sources you have there...Not.

Are we even talking about the same thing? I'm saying that the stroke order, used in Imperial China (which is when nobody wrote left to right), is as the ROC MOE has recorded it. The links you posted are of the modern stroke order, which was developed to compensate for horizontal writing left to right. But, someone already told you that, and you didn't listen, so I guess this is pointless.

And if you think we are talking about the same thing, what are you doing citing sources that talk about Simplified Chinese characters? Of course the standardized stroke order for Simplified Chinese characters has 我 ending with 丶. Hell, even the modern Traditional Chinese standard has it.

The sources that are not worthless are scholarly, and are referring to the stroke order used in Imperial China.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hofmann

Sorry to revive this, but upon further observation, the MOE site doesn't completely follow the stroke order in Imperial China. For example, characters like 有 and 右 started with 丿, while characters like 在 and 左 started with 一. The site changed them all to start with 一, perhaps to make stroke order more regular so as not to overwhelm children. Another example is 必. Many calligraphers (including 歐陽詢) started with 丿, while the MOE writes 心 and then 丿. 成 started with the left 丿, while the MOE starts with 一, again making stroke order regular. There are many other examples, but I just wanted to point out that the ROC MOE's stroke order isn't completely "traditional."

My posts about the stroke order of 戈 were probably wrong. See my (Asoer's) notes here, and Stroke Order per Polity in main article on Wikipedia.

Edited by Hofmann

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and select your username and password later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Click here to reply. Select text to quote.

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...