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Korean stereotypes among Chinese


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woodcutter

OK then, if nobody knows a decent Korean forum, perhaps I could ask something here. I have spent a lot of time in Korea and China, and the relationship between the two interests me.

I remember I once asked why a student had so many bruises, and I was told that her boyfriend was Korean, so this was perfectly natural. Is this a common stereotype?

A number of Chinese students also told me they didn't like Koreans, but wouldn't/couldn't tell me why. Yet Korean dramas and music are popular in China these days, and many Chinese seem to have the idea that Korean people are often very beautiful.

What do you think are common Chinese stereotypes of Koreans?

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I'm not sure about it, but when i just told my friends (just a hour before) i met a korean in Thai, snorkeled and had a raw and live octopus together, she felt dreaded with that.

She told me her experience in traveling to korea, they were impolite, dull and poor in english. But my experience was totally different: they were helpful and nice anyway.

However, it seems that korean boss, like the japanese one, is rude, not understanding and try best to deprive of their employees. That's the impression from a news report about the conduct of their businessmen in southern china, though it may not reflect every of them.

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skylee

I've watched plenty korean TV dramas and made a few trips to Korea. I find (now this is just personal opinions) koreans rude, impolite and hot-tempered. I particularly cannot stand the way koreans sit (especially women) when they put their feet on their chairs (they do it even in HK) because this is a :nono for Chinese (well I feel the same towards mainland tourists squatting on the street whenever they feel tired but this is not what we are talking about).

One incident - I was in a western restaurant in Sokcho which was filled with young korean women with their feet on the sofas. I was trying hard to read the English menu in the dim light, when suddenly a waiter grabbed it out of my hands from behind me. I was so shocked that I couldn't react. Then another waiter who knew I was a foreigner came apologizing saying that his colleague had mistaken me as a korean (like he wouldn't allow a korean to read an english menu). But I don't think any waiters elsewhere would behave that way. Thus the impression of rudeness (there were other incidents).

But I did meet some very nice people during my trips. Another incident - a korean woman sat beside me on a flight and realized I was not korean because I read English books. She tried to talk to me but we could not communicate. 30 minutes of silence. Then just before landing she grabbed my arm (rude/impolite) and said "have a nice day", which I think she had spent 30 minutes to prepare (nice).

I think the communication barriers are the main reasons of any poor impressions.

Male characters in korean dramas are generally good-looking and gentle and caring (like Bae Yong Jun). Female characters are usually young, good-looking and gentle and caring. HAHA. 8)

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Bamboo Grove

I once took a ferry from Yeosu to Pusan and sat next to an elderly Korean lady. We couldn't communicat with each other but had a great trip. Laughed together most of the time. The three weeks I spent in Korea were great and I met plenty of nice people who went out of their way just to help me. I don't know if it had anything to do that I'm from Finland because once upon the time there was a theory that the two languages are related. I've had similar experiences in Hungary (our languages are truly related) :lol:

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Generally I have some good experience with other Koreans, indeed I haven't met much but most of them are quite nice.

But they (similar to Chinese and Japanese in general) tend to live in a group, travel in a group, sometimes it can be quite a strange phenomenon. In Vietnam I've met a Korean middle-aged man, he came in the dormitory and said cheerfully to me that he was so happy to meet the "first Asian" in Vietnam (oh oh oh, Vietnam is in Europe?), and he suggested us to have a lunch.

I thought we could go for a lunch only, but then it was getting quite annoying that he kept following me everywhere, with quite a big language barrier, I tried to suggest him that we should travel separately without hurting him. He nodded and kept saying okay okay, then waited me to finish doing my own things...

Finally I had to escape from him by suggesting to have a dinner with him, so we should go to DIFFERENT PLACES NOW! He finally got it, and went back to ask the time and place of our dinner gathering...

But Koreans can be very considerate (especially to their Korean travel companions), which I really admired. They form a small but respectful community to protect themselves, to help each other (or strictly speaking, one helping all others).

Korean boyfriend beating up girlfriend? I dont' know, but I've seen a Korean boy carrying the backpack of his girlfriend up to Annapurna (another amazing scene more stunning than the Himalaya!)

I don't know what perceptions I have about Koreans indeed, I still haven't met enough Koreans to be able to generalize their behavior... (contrary to Japanese, haha?)

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I don't know if it had anything to do that I'm from Finland because once upon the time there was a theory that the two languages are related.

Funny. I've heard that the korean language shares some common characteristics with Turkish. Though it's strange to make this suggestion, it's quite possible.

Turkish and Hungarian may have, at least, some of the unproved origin in the northern and western china in ancient days, which was also a home to the Goguryeo---the ancestor of korean. Of course modern nation is a rather complicated combination of different clans and tribes, but some characteristic should still lie in today.

Bamboo, what about the theory that suggests korean and finnish are related? How is the tale told?

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I have worked for a short while in South Korea and traveled there for a couple of times.

Overall my opinion is quite favorable. They may seem rude but once you get well-acquainted with them, the Koreans can be extremely friendly.

But I cannot stand how they drink -- exchange soju glasses and fill up -- to show hospitality.

For Korean women, I also have high regard. Once I was in the Seoul subway, a young Korean woman with OL appearance suddenly yielded her seat to me in the cramped train compartment and willingly held my shopping bag.

I never encounter such experience in any other subway in other metropolis!

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a young Korean woman with OL appearance suddenly yielded her seat to me in the cramped train compartment and willingly held my shopping bag.

:lol: are you really a 伯伯?

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PollyWaffle

most koreans i have met are pretty cool... they love to drink, laugh & eat hot food, so i have a lot in common with them... i do, however, hate their obssession with people's age... especially the way when a young korean guy talks & laugh with me, then finds out i am 8 years older than i look, drinks with his back to me & stops talking... ah, it's culture, i should respect it...

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Bamboo Grove

A Finn, Gustaf John Ramstedt (1873-1950), who was also a Finnish Ambassador to Japan in 1919-30 tried to find out whether there were any relationshisp between the two languages. This is not the case and I'm not sure whether he even believed it himself, but anyhow he did study these matters. One interesting point, however, is that the way the Koreans (and the Japanese as well) form there questions (-ka, -ko endings) is so similar to the Finnish way. We use -ko, -kö endings to form our basic questions. For example in English: Statent; You go, question; do you go and in Finnish; statement; sinä (you) menet (go), question; menet (do you go?) and if I remember correctly Japanese: ikimasu - ikimasuka?

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All of the Koreans I have met were friendly. Pazu is correct about them forming tight-knit communities to help each other. In some sense, Chinese do the same thing, but it seems even stronger with Koreans.

When I was studying in Beijing, most of the Korean students I met did not have any non-Korean friends. Of course, this is understandable - some don't speak good English, not to mention their Chinese... :roll::mrgreen:

But compared to the limited number of Japanese I have met, I would say Koreans are much easier to get to know and become friends with. The culture is a bit annoying at times, but it makes things run smoothly according to known patterns.

as for the stereotypes, I would agree that Korean guys can be quite rough to their girlfriends...

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One interesting point, however, is that the way the Koreans (and the Japanese as well) form there questions (-ka, -ko endings) is so similar to the Finnish way. We use -ko, -kö endings to form our basic questions. For example in English: Statent; You go, question; do you go and in Finnish; statement; sinä (you) menet (go), question; menetkö (do you go?) and if I remember correctly Japanese: ikimasu - ikimasuka?

doesn't Chinese have the same kind of endings? just different consonants. Then there's the dialects, also just different endings...

that point doesn't say much.

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no, it doesn't, but some linguists believe there is a link between the finno-ugric tribes and Korea and Japan.

If you actually listen to Finnish (which I have been doing for the past week), you will be surprised that often it sounds very similar to Japanese...

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Bamboo Grove
doesn't Chinese have the same kind of endings?

In Chinese you use the question word "ma", don't you. In Finnish, Hungarian, Korean and Japanese the syllable is added to the verb, so I think it's a bit different. Also the conjugation of verbs has some similarities.

I particularly cannot stand the way koreans sit (especially women) when they put their feet on their chairs (they do it even in HK) because this is a for Chinese

Most South-East Asians do the same. This comes from the habit of having no chairs at home. When one is accustomed to doing something in a certain way, it is difficult to change the habit. I find extremely difficult to sit on the floor and eat. :lol:

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I particularly cannot stand the way koreans sit (especially women) when they put their feet on their chairs (they do it even in HK) because this is a for Chinese

I have seen many westerners, men and women, doing this. I don't think Koreans often do that. Maybe they are copying the westerners. Do you mean while wearing shoes? I don't think koreans would do that - we never wear shoes in the house. But we are used to sitting on the floor so maybe some people put their feet (no shoes) on the chair when they are very tired.

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