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Kenny同志

what does "initiative" refer to?

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gato

"this work" refers to writings about "revolution in military affairs", which the author is criticizing.

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animal world

Gato with his sixteen-hour advantage beat me to it.

From the passage shown, it is not entirely clear that "work" refers to books written about RMA. I interpreted RMA to be more of a doctrine or philosophy. In any case, "work" definitely refers to RMA. The author could have been a bit more specific, such as "some of the literature/books written about RMA..." It seems that by the time s/he reached the sentence in which "work" appears s/he had gotten tired of her/his own rambling and didn't bother to come up with a better word.

Kenny, do you and your employer realize the lovely document you're translating from is under copyright? One is not allowed to translate it without specific permission. Under "fair use" rules, however, permission is not required if it's only being done for educational purposes.

You'd better watch it, Kenny! If the Pentagon finds out about your activities, it might send a drone your way. The assassination of an Austrian Archduke in Sarajevo triggered WWI. Kenny's translation of a US military document for monetary gain might get us all embroiled in WWIII. L’histoire se répète...

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Kenny同志

It may be for education or study.

Once a military document comes out, it will surely be translated into many languages quickly. Of course, if one translates a Chinese military manual into English, in almost all cases, he doesn't and won't inform the Chinese National Defense Ministry.

Edited by kenny2006woo

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animal world

Oh, Kenny, i was pulling your leg (= joking) :wink: Don't have much time now but i'll come back to this thread later to revise my comments to be consistent with your deletions.

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renzhe
Kenny, do you and your employer realize the lovely document you're translating from is under copyright? One is not allowed to translate it without specific permission.

You're allowed to translate it all you want, you're just not allowed to reproduce or publish the document or the translations, though.

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animal world

[sighs deeply]

Yes, and that is covered under the "Fair Use" provision which you conveniently left out in your quote.

Oh, come on, anyone understands that you can translate anything you want, even on a roll of toilet paper if that's what you fancy. But publishing it or making money of it without permission is an entirely different matter.

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Kenny同志

Just out of bed. Didn't sleep well during the night (I dreamed the CIA sent a spy to get Kenny. Kidding:wink:). Top-heavy now.

Edited by kenny2006woo

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Kenny同志

mounted vertical maneuver (mounted 垂直机动)

What does "mounted" mean here? I have consulted several dictionaries but there isn't anything helpful. Could someone explain it to me?

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chrix

I'm by no means a military expert, but how about "a vertical maneuver involving mounted forces"?

As for "mounted", the Random House Dictionary has the following definition:

Military. (formerly) permanently equipped with horses or vehicles for transport

I think though in a modern context it wouldn't refer to the cavalry but rather to tanks and other heavy vehicles. But I could be wrong, as I'm no military expert...

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Kenny同志

Thanks Daan and thanks again, Chrix.

Quote:

Military. (formerly) permanently equipped with horses or vehicles for transport

or vehicles for transport

I think this makes sense. I've found another link (mounted troops). Clearly the U.S. forces are not on horses.

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