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OneEye

Need Help Finding An Obscure Character

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OneEye

I'm working on a project with some other Chinese learners on another board in which we are putting Rick Harbaugh's 中文字譜/zhongwen.com site into spreadsheet format in order to import into Anki as flashcards. So far I've been able to find appropriate glyphs for every character and component in the book. He largely based the organization on the 說文解字, which has made finding the more obscure glyphs fairly easy (owing to shuowenjiezi.com and Unicode Extensions A and B).

However, this character (see image) has me stumped. Harbaugh claims that 要, 票, 䙴, and 農 all derive from it originally, and I have been able to find variants of all these characters including this component (which I can't put here because it causes the site to freak and delete the rest of my post). But I can't find the component alone. The 說文 doesn't say anything about the component, but rather explains the characters differently (for instance, 農 is glossed as 从䢅囟聲).

So, did Harbaugh make this component up, or is it actually out there somewhere in another context? He has a tendency in the book to use hand-drawn characters for some of the glyphs that presumably weren't in any encoding system at the time he wrote the book, but so far I've been able to find his makeshift glyphs to be well-supported.

Here's a link to the entry on his website, for reference.

Oops. Looks like I posted it twice when I tried to edit. Could someone delete the other thread?

post-4442-12742200908_thumb.jpg

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Hofmann

Welcome to the Victims of Post Truncation Club.

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OneEye

Yeah...I tried to go in and edit this post to fix that but accidentally posted it as another new thread. It doesn't seem like I can delete my own posts, so hopefully a moderator can help out with that. In the meantime I'll fix this one too. And add the image that I forgot to add.

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Hofmann

Well, I can't find the glyph, but he didn't make it up.

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OneEye

So it does exist as a character in its own right?

I've found it in Wieger, in "Lesson 50," entry M. Too bad I can't copy/paste from a book. I've also found it as a component in lots of other characters (other than those I've already mentioned) by browsing through the Character Palette on my Mac. But it isn't there. I find it odd that it would be included in so many glyphs without being encoded as a standalone character.

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OneEye

It's really odd to me that this character shows up in two books in English (though Wieger was originally in French), but I can't find it in Unicode. It just can't be that rare if there are two books right here in my office that include it. It is even assigned the same Mandarin pronunciation in both books (yāo).

This is really odd.

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trien27

Well, I can't find the glyph, but he didn't make it up.

Kangxi online dictionary [On page 14, 辰 radical, 2nd character under 6 strokes] have shown that the one from your link is 1 of the 9 different ways of writing it in Ancient Chinese.

So, Harbaugh didn't make it up.

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OneEye

Kangxi online dictionary [On page 14, 辰 radical, 2nd character under 6 strokes] have shown that the one from your link is 1 of the 9 different ways of writing it in Ancient Chinese.

So, Harbaugh didn't make it up.

I don't think you're following me.

I know that it exists as a component in other characters. I've said this already. I've found a lot of characters that include this as a component. I'm looking for it as a standalone character, but I've only found it as part of other characters.

The closest I've gotten is here. In my 2009 printed copy of 說文解字 (万卷出版公司, ISBN 978-7-80759-653-0), the character is there in the definition, and in the translation into modern Chinese. But on that website (shuowenjiezi.com) it is shown as 「臼+囟」. On zdic it is 「臼中囟」. On lots of other sites, for some reason, it is 納. So it will say 火飛也。从火,納與䙴同意。 with 納 replacing the glyph I'm looking for.

I guess it just isn't in Unicode. I wonder how the publishers of my copy of 說文解字 got it onto the page.

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Hofmann

I would have drawn it with Illustrator or something.

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