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mikelove

SOPA/PIPA and the US Great Firewall

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gato

http://www.distresse...or-hr-3261.html

Under SOPA, Scribd would no longer be able to exist. And as I've linked to Scribd in the past, I and many other prominent financial bloggers could be held liable and cut off from the DNS directory and search engines.

Google , AOL, eBay, Facebook, LinkedIn, Mozilla, Twitter, Yahoo and Zynga are all vehemently opposed to the legislation. Think about it: If some person uploads to YouTube just one unauthorized piece of copyrighted material, the ENTIRE SITE CAN BE SHUT DOWN.

Sounds extreme.

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Silent

It may sound extreme, but it's possible. I see this kind of tendencies everywhere. Not guilty unless proven otherwise changes more and more in guilty unless proven otherwise. It gives the power to the rich and wealthy as they can easily dispute false claims. The average common man whose website is blocked has not the financial means to get into an extended battle in court.

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Areckx

Either way, people will adapt and we'll just have something new. As long as I can get Chinese and Japanese into my ears and eyes, I'm fine. I don't care if the website has to change.

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mikelove
Sounds extreme.

I agree that it's unlikely it would actually be used to shut down a big site like YouTube or Scribd - they have armies of lawyers to prevent such a thing - but what about a simple little discussion forum that happens to end up with a few pirated file attachments because the owner was insufficiently vigilant about checking them? If their contact info is wrong, or the threatening email goes to the wrong place, or the owner is on vacation and doesn't see it in time, they could end up being pulled down without ever even knowing there was a problem.

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AdamD
Either way, people will adapt and we'll just have something new.

True, but in the worst possible way. If the law passes, the people who don't infringe copyright will be heavily inconvenienced, and the hardcore copyright infringers will find ways to continue doing so.

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navaburo

This means a lot coming from you, Mike. I deeply respect you for the work you have done on Pleco (which I use heavily), and I recognize the huge role that copyright plays in your business. I have already written my congressman regarding PROTECT IP, but I will write again concerning Stop Online Piracy.

Thank you for bringing this important issue to our attention.

-Chris

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mikelove

Thanks, but while I do believe it's a terrible bill for everyone, there's also some enlightened self-interest at work in my case - many of our future plans for Pleco involve users being able to share more content with each other, and my favorite fallback business idea (been keeping a list of them for years in case things go badly with Pleco, though after a decade of sales growth that's starting to seem pretty unlikely...) is even more user-content-centric.

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imron

Many other sites are also blacking out today. If you read the learn more section, they also tell you how to work around the blackout if you really, really need access.

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jbradfor

While I'm not for SOPA, I don't think wikipedia is doing the right thing. That said, they are making it really easy to bypass the "blackout". For example, I've read that it still works fine on mobile devices. For non-mobile devices (which, ironically, includes laptops.....), just let the page load, then click reload, then press esc a couple of times, and everything is fine.

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imron

From the page Skylee linked to above:

Is it still possible to access Wikipedia in any way? Yes. During the blackout, Wikipedia is accessible on mobile devices and smart phones. You can also view Wikipedia normally by disabling JavaScript in your browser, as explained on this Technical FAQ page. Our purpose here isn't to make it completely impossible for people to read Wikipedia, and it's okay for you to circumvent the blackout. We just want to make sure you see our message.
Anyone reloading/pressing escape a couple of times is doing it wrong (and didn't bother to read Wikipedia's explanation of the issue to boot). Wikipedia themselves say they're not trying to make it impossible to read Wikipedia - they're just trying to bring the issue to people's attention. Personally I support them in this decision, especially as not being a US citizen I have little/no way to make an impact on such a stupid law, so it's good to see people standing up to fight it.

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renzhe
provides a pretty good summary of what's wrong with SOPA and PIPA, for people having trouble getting through the legalese.

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jbradfor
Anyone reloading/pressing escape a couple of times is doing it wrong

Why is that "wrong", given that it's much easer than disabling JS? To a casual user, any solution that requires a "technical FAQ" is not making it easy.

not being a US citizen I have little/no way to make an impact on such a stupid law,

I don't feel I have much of a way to make an impact either.....

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imron
To a casual user, any solution that requires a "technical FAQ" is not making it easy.

Perhaps. Though for me, enabling/disabling Javascript is the press of a button. I imagine there will be many others for whom it's the same.

I don't feel I have much of a way to make an impact either

At least you have a senator you can call.

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jbradfor

I think I'm going to get a t-shirt made saying "I survived the great wikipedia blackout of 2012".

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skylee

Please post a photo of the t-shirt here.

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imron

And all you got was a lousy photoshopped t-shirt :wink:

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imron

Also of interest is this article showing that the blackout did indeed achieve a positive result. Whether it's enough, only time will tell.

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