Jump to content
Chinese-forums.com
Learn Chinese in China

Many questions about teaching English in China


Teza
 Share

Recommended Posts

  • New Members

Hello! I'm thinking about teaching English in Shanghai, China but I have a few doubts! I'll number them below because there's quite a few of them:

1) I'm Brazilian but I have a proficiency certificate (CPE). I'm worried that my nationality will get in the way of finding a job. I moved to the U.S.A as a child so my English is fluent but I have a Brazilian passport. Will this get in the way of finding a job?

2) Does speaking Mandarin at intermediate level help to get a job at all?

3) I have a TESOL certificate accredited by The College of Teachers, is it worthwhile to get a CELTA instead or can you still find a job with another TESOL certificate ( so long as it's accredited)?

4) Do most contracts offer housing as well?

5) I have a bachelor's in business, does having a college degree offer me better opportunities or better pay?

6) If the answer is yes to the above question, is it worthwhile to get a Master's degree? I'll only go to China in a couple of years so I'd have time to get one. The point is: how much do degrees influence opportunities and pay?

7) Can you really live on 5000 RMB a month?

8) If I have an extra teaching certificate ( like teaching English to kids or a vusiness English training certificate) will this make it easier to find a job?

Thank you all very much for your time!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Site Sponsors:
Pleco for iPhone / Android iPhone & Android Chinese dictionary: camera & hand- writing input, flashcards, audio.
Study Chinese in Kunming 1-1 classes, qualified teachers and unique teaching methods in the Spring City.
Learn Chinese Characters Learn 2289 Chinese Characters in 90 Days with a Unique Flash Card System.
Hacking Chinese Tips and strategies for how to learn Chinese more efficiently
Popup Chinese Translator Understand Chinese inside any Windows application, website or PDF.
Chinese Grammar Wiki All Chinese grammar, organised by level, all in one place.

1) I'm Brazilian but I have a proficiency certificate (CPE). I'm worried that my nationality will get in the way of finding a job. I moved to the U.S.A as a child so my English is fluent but I have a Brazilian passport. Will this get in the way of finding a job?

There's quite obvious racism on this issue. Regardless of your background, a white face can sell.

2) Does speaking Mandarin at intermediate level help to get a job at all?

Never heard of it. It will obviously help your students understand more, but you don't need to speak Chinese to get a job.

3) I have a TESOL certificate accredited by The College of Teachers, is it worthwhile to get a CELTA instead or can you still find a job with another TESOL certificate ( so long as it's accredited)?

TESOL is great enough. Many others don't even have it.

4) Do most contracts offer housing as well?

It depends but always try to ask for it. At least get some allowances on food and accommodation.

5) I have a bachelor's in business, does having a college degree offer me better opportunities or better pay?

The province and school you choose to go seems to be more relevant when you talk about 'better pay'. For example, the pay in Yangshuo is usually lower than Guangzhou.

6) If the answer is yes to the above question, is it worthwhile to get a Master's degree? I'll only go to China in a couple of years so I'd have time to get one. The point is: how much do degrees influence opportunities and pay?

You really don't need a master degree to get a English teaching job in China.

7) Can you really live on 5000 RMB a month?

Yes, but the standard of living varies according to where you base. But considering your background, don't accept any offer at RMB 5000. Try to ask more.

8) If I have an extra teaching certificate ( like teaching English to kids or a vusiness English training certificate) will this make it easier to find a job?

No need.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In response,

1. having a Brazilian passport will not stop you from getting a Eng teaching job in China.

2. Ability to speak Mandarin does not really give you a job advantage over someone who doesn't, however, there are cultural advantages in this which may be indirectly linked to you getting a job.

3. Generally speaking, you can get a job if you have any type of bachelors degree. It just depends on which institution you work for.

4. Contracts usually offer accommodation.

5. You're right. The fame and location of your school will determine your salary, not necessarily your qualifications. Shanghai will generally pay the most because Shanghai is the financial capital of Mainland China.

6. You don't need a Masters to get a teaching job in China. In fact, you don't even need a degree if you're obviously Caucasian looking. But if you're not, then degrees will help a little. Even if you have a masters, they're not going to pay you many thousands more either.

7. Yes you can live on 5000 a month depending on where you are. You can even live on 3000. Just say you've lived in USA all your life.

8. What you have is already enough. No more to get more certificates. Certificates are for people who do not already have degrees.

- It would be best if you have a degree from a US university. That would make up for everything else.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1) I'm Brazilian but I have a proficiency certificate (CPE). I'm worried that my nationality will get in the way of finding a job. I moved to the U.S.A as a child so my English is fluent but I have a Brazilian passport. Will this get in the way of finding a job?

Yes. Most schools want native speakers, or, alternatively, non-native speakers with passports from native-speaking countries. Not only is such a passport needed for your work documentation, but parents/students may ask to see it to prove you are what they are selling.

With that said, many non-natives find employment as English teachers throughout China, albeit at smaller schools in smaller cities and with lower pay. The demand is simply too high.

2) Does speaking Mandarin at intermediate level help to get a job at all?

No. In fact, most schools would be unhappy if you spoke to students in Chinese during class time.

3) I have a TESOL certificate accredited by The College of Teachers, is it worthwhile to get a CELTA instead or can you still find a job with another TESOL certificate ( so long as it's accredited)?

More and more schools are requiring a TESOL, even for experienced teachers. The brand name (e.g. CELTA) is not a big issue.

4) Do most contracts offer housing as well?

Most schools offer either a free apartment or a housing allowance.

5) I have a bachelor's in business, does having a college degree offer me better opportunities or better pay?

Yes, but you still have the hurdle of being a non-native speaker. Even if your English is better than those with passports from English-speaking countries, you'll unfortunately still be regarded as a "second-class teacher."

6) If the answer is yes to the above question, is it worthwhile to get a Master's degree? I'll only go to China in a couple of years so I'd have time to get one. The point is: how much do degrees influence opportunities and pay?

If you had an American passport, I'd say go for it. An MA and some teaching experience would make you eligible for higher paying positions later down the road. However, your nationality will be an issue.

With that said, I have known some non-native DOSs, albeit they were in very small cities managing small schools.

7) Can you really live on 5000 RMB a month?

Outside of the cities mentioned above, absolutely. Living off 1500 - 2000 RMB in Harbin, for example, is more than possible.

8. If I have an extra teaching certificate ( like teaching English to kids or a vusiness English training certificate) will this make it easier to find a job?

Not if you already have a TESOL and a BA.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I can't really help you on job hunting but when I was still in high school in Guangzhou, we used to have a foreigner (an American I think)who gave english lessons once a week. Apparently he was doing part-time work in my old school and another one, and he said he offered private tuition for those students who wanted someone to practice speaking.He lived in a really nice area near central Guangzhou.So I reckon that he was well-paid.

Also he didnt know any Chinese. I think the point is to make it funny and different from the traditional preaching style.

Good luck!:)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and select your username and password later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Click here to reply. Select text to quote.

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...