Jump to content
Chinese-forums.com
Learn Chinese in China

oneeyedcats

Chiang Kai-shek (蔣介石 or 蔣中正)'s legacy in the Mainland

Recommended Posts

oneeyedcats

A couple of weeks ago I asked a friend of mine - a fairly well educated Chinese girl - what's her opinion on Jiang Kai-shek. Rather than saying something well-versed like "the man who had to be defeated in order for China to be liberated and prosperous" or even "a betrayer of the nation", (some young Chinese people tend to say things which read like PRC propaganda when asked about something "controversial"), she gave out a giggle and said something along the lines of: "wait, I've read about him.. he is the husband of one of the Song sisters, right". Yeah, well, I didn't expect that ;D.

So, is there anyone who has discussed the topic at length or, even better, a Chinese person who's honest and open enough to give a fair assessment (or more like what's the general attutude towards him) on Mr. Jiang's legacy in the Mainland?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Site Sponsors:
Pleco for iPhone / Android iPhone & Android Chinese dictionary: camera & hand- writing input, flashcards, audio.
Study Chinese in Kunming 1-1 classes, qualified teachers and unique teaching methods in the Spring City.
Learn Chinese Characters Learn 2289 Chinese Characters in 90 Days with a Unique Flash Card System.
Hacking Chinese Tips and strategies for how to learn Chinese more efficiently
Popup Chinese Translator Understand Chinese inside any Windows application, website or PDF.
Chinese Grammar Wiki All Chinese grammar, organised by level, all in one place.

skylee

Well maybe your friend is not that well educated after all.

Must the Chinese person you referred to be from Mainland China?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
oneeyedcats

Well, not really, as long as the said Chinese person knows the general attitude towards Jiang in the PRC :). Actually, anyone who feels like commenting or adding anything related to the question (regardless of his/her knowledge on the subject) is of course most welcome, that's why I created the topic.

As for my friend, well, I've known her for probably eight months or so and she seems to know more than your average Chinese youth about politics and stuff.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
gato
So, is there anyone who has discussed the topic at length or, even better, a Chinese person who's honest and open enough to give a fair assessment (or more like what's the general attutude towards him) on Mr. Jiang's legacy in the Mainland?

Jiang's legacy is Mao? Can't say that he has much of legacy today in mainland China. That's what happens when you lose a civil war. It's usually winner takes all. He has much more of a legacy in Taiwan.

On the other hand, there is much more interest and openness about Jiang in mainland today. You can find many books about him, and his son, in bookstores. That wasn't the case even ten years ago. I think the change came about when the mainland government became more friendly with the KMT in Taiwan during Chen Shuibian's term in office.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Erbse

Does Jiang Kai-shek appear in history class in school in mainland China?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
bhchao

A few people from mainland China told me that Chiang's stubborn fight during the Sino-Japanese war preserved China's sovereignty. He prevented Japanese troops from being used against the Americans in the Pacific.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
imron

Most of the people from the mainland I've heard talking about it say that Jiang was happy just to sit back and let the Japanese invade because they were mostly fighting against communist troops and therefore he was going on the logic of the enemy of my enemy is my friend. So he retreated out of harm's way to Chongqing, and planned to let the communists and the Japanese fight it out amongst themselves and then pick up the pieces when they were done.

Note, whether or not this was actually the case I have no idea, however it's definitely what some mainland Chinese believe.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
bhchao

A recent joint scholarship in Taipei held by PRC and Taiwan historians sheds some light on Chiang: http://www.thechinabeat.org/?p=4255

Chiang's rough childhood molded his stubborn character and leadership. Chiang was not a lackey of the Americans as many people from the mainland believe. Throughout his life he harbored deep suspicions and animosity toward the US. He resisted attempts by any country to control him, including the Soviet Union. After the KMT retreated to Taiwan, Chiang and his son ended the careers of statesmen/generals who were close with the US (ex. Sun Liren, Wu Guozhen, Yeh Gongchao). Chiang's fights against Joe Stilwell were legendary.

But Chiang was also pragmatic. He put aside his personal feelings to work with an ally when doing so was beneficial. He used Soviet advisors before 1927, and when they tried to control or manipulate him, he broke with them by purging them from China.

Chiang was Machiavellian in politics, technocratically pragmatic in economics.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
imron
Obviously brainwashed and misguided.

But still not that uncommon a perception.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and select your username and password later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Click here to reply. Select text to quote.

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...