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Auberon

Glossika method

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cliveface96

@Flickserve thanks for the reply, I was previously recording Skype sessions but I stopped mainly because I just didn't have enough time (with uni + other commitments) to split it up anymore. I might try it out as having a good base of sentences to branch out from does seem to be what I'm missing at the moment. That being said 150 USD is a load of money even if it is for a year + uni is about to get a whole lot more full on next year. 

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Flickserve
15 hours ago, cliveface96 said:

That being said 150 USD is a load of money even if it is for a year + uni is about to get a whole lot more full on next year

 

Since you are a full time student, I would be a rather hesitant to recommend it. 

 

I would go through sentences that you had before (because of familiarity) and of necessary, get someone to re-record them. If you are going to practice speaking and fluency as the primary objective as an exercise, it looks to me it’s best if you already know the vocabulary rather than trying to integrate it with whole bunch of new vocabulary. After all, we might know all the vocabulary in a sentence but get mixed up in the order of words or intonation or tones. Every single piece of new vocabulary is an additional distraction. 

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Flickserve

Been playing with the glossika Web app for a week. All I have been doing is repeating the sentences as there are some other options available. It took a few days to get used to the style of learning. There is an option to mark sentences as easy but none to mark them as hard. Strange that. There are only two repetitions of the target sentence but why not have the flexibility to increase it to four?

 

I initially set the native language to English and target to Mandarin Beijing. First there was a placement test to test your listening skills and place you at a certain level. I got A2 for Chinese Beijing and B1 for Chinese Taiwan. Also tried the Cantonese - it stopped at B1

 

Disappointed in that it does not have stronger 儿话音. Sentence structures look fine but some queries do come up. I like the Web based feature so I can quickly look at the sentence. It was pretty difficult to do that with the old MP3's, in fact I never even opened the pdf. It is very convenient to use on the smartphone and you can do a few repetitions when there is a temporary lull in your day. It does mean that I can access the learning incredibly conveniently and literally utilise odd moments during the day. 

 

Not sure after a week that I have had a noticeable improvement. Some sentences are new vocabulary so I had to get learn those before thinking I can mark it as done. There are some other functions such as translation or dictation. Haven't delved into that but I think this is now a much better product. It's a pity that the original pricing is 30 usd a month which I consider pretty expensive. 15 usd a month that I got would capture so many more customers. 

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emuboy

Some strange names/places to include in basic sentences though. Often uses English names like Oliver and random places like Buenos Aires, bit tough to pronounce but good practice nonetheless I suppose!

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Flickserve

Yeah. Hate the names myself. I just don't take pronouncing names seriously. 

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emuboy

Anyone have thoughts on Glossika's SRS system? You seem to do a new card for 4-5 days then it disappears for good. Not sure if I particularly like this approach as it doesn't seem to be enough time to fully memorise it for me. Anyone persisted with it for a while know if those cards eventually come back or is that it?

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Crush

The older intensive schedules were a bit better, you reviewed the sentences several times and got about 90k reviews overall for the 3000 sentences. The new schedule as you said shows you the sentence for four or five days (depending on whether you're studying more than or less than 15 new sentences a day) and that's it. Obviously over the course of 3000+ sentences you're going to see words and phrases repeated. Mike's said that the goal isn't to memorize the sentences or even the vocabulary but to internalize the structures and i remember him mentioning his "dislike" towards classic SRS systems like Anki/Supermemo/Mnemosyne.

 

However, if you are only dedicating 20-30 minutes a day to Glossika, the new schedule and old schedule is pretty much the same, you'd get a similar experience to the old one by studying 20+ sentences a day, though with the old intensive schedule (about 1.5-2hrs a day) you'd have an extra review a few days later to help solidify things.

 

Re: names, i personally skip them. I just use ta(men) or just hum the name. That makes the sentences unnecessarily hard, you're learning something that for most people is going to be absolutely useless and just cause you a lot of headaches. The Cantonese course uses the original names, which is what i and most people would probably do in a normal situation. Anyway, try it out and see if it doesn't make the course less painful for you. For place names, shorter ones or ones i think i'd like to know i'll learn, especially country names, but long city names (like Buenos Aires) i tend to skip or just 乱说.

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Tomsima

My two cents: if you're looking to use Chinese professionally in a bilingual office environment, learning how to say Western names in Chinese will be useful, learning place names invaluable. Buenos Aires is an example of something that will inevitably be of use in 'international' conversations. Thus, I personally like this approach, even if it seems pointless at the beginning.

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Crush

Yeah, but if you're going to need those things professionally you'll learn them in context and on your own. "Buenos Aires" is definitely not in the top 5k of most frequent words, neither are the names. Likewise, if someone wants you to call them by their Chinese name, they're going to tell you their Chinese name, they're not going to say "我叫Tom" and expect you to call them 汤姆. It would be far more useful to use native Chinese names, but as the sentences were all mined from English grammar books the names are a bit all over. In my experience, a lot (well, maybe not a lot, at least some) of the city and place names apart from the big ones like New York and Paris are unfamiliar even to native Chinese speakers, unless they've either lived there or visited the place.

 

 So in my personal opinion, the names are more of a headache than anything else and you can safely skip over them, how often are you going to be talking about Buenos Aires in China anyway? If you are working with Latin American countries in China you'll learn the names through context anyway, but how many of us (in China or elsewhere) are working with Chinese people with business relations in Buenos Aires? I don't mind it so much now as i just skip over it, but when i first started using Glossika it caused me a lot of headaches 😉 I don't mind learning the country names, though, for the most part they're short anyway.

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emuboy

Yeah country names are definitely useful, as are some obvious place names (e.g. Paris). Think I'm gonna stick with it for a while, as with everything in Chinese learning it seems it takes about 3 or 4 months to actually know whether it's worth doing or not (and generally anything you do consistently seems to pay dividends).

Thanks guys !

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Flickserve

I have had it for over two weeks. Manage to still at it which is a good sign!

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