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Lynn Woods

Business Correspondence

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Lynn Woods

Hello, a first posting and I would appreciate some help.

 

I run a Company which last year ordered some equipment from the (independent) UK subsidiary of a very large Chinese motor manufacturer.  In the event the delivery date wasn't met, the UK operation clammed up and wouldn't communicate, we cancelled the order, and they are still sitting on a hefty deposit which runs into 5 digits UK £.  We are poised to sue through the UK courts but first we thought we might alert the Chinese parent company since they are almost certainly unaware of the dreadful behaviour of their UK operation and would not wish this sort of thing to wind up in the trade press which will certainly be the case if we go legal.

 

So, I've written a detailed and entirely reasonable letter to the lady CFO of the parent company.  We have carefully avoided saying anything that is critical of the parent business and asked only that they help us recover our deposit.  Questions are:

 

1.  How appropriately to close the letter.  It currently goes...

 

"With the Kindest Respects and Regards

 

Yours Sincerely"

 

That's how I might close a business letter to someone in the Middle East - is it an appropriate way to communicate with senior businesswoman in China?

 

2.  Should I get the letter translated into Chinese and send it in both languages?  In which case can anyone recommend a reliable translator?

 

Thanks in anticipation

 

Lynn

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Kenny同志

1.  How appropriately to close the letter.  It currently goes...

 

"With the Kindest Respects and Regards

 

Yours Sincerely"

 

That's how I might close a business letter to someone in the Middle East - is it an appropriate way to communicate with senior businesswoman in China?

 

 

I would say just end it in such a way as you would end a business letter to a senior English businesswoman.

 

2.  Should I get the letter translated into Chinese and send it in both languages?  In which case can anyone recommend a reliable translator?

 

Thanks in anticipation

 

 

 

You can have the letter translated into Chinese to show your respect and thoughtfulness or in case she doesn't know enough English, though this is very unlikely.

 

Anyway, if you decide to have it translated into Chinese, I can help. I am a professional English-Chinese translator. For more information, you can visit my website at www.into-good-chinese.co.uk

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Lu

I agree with Kenny, if I were you I'd just write the same polite phrases as you would to a businesswoman in your own country. You can consider trying to use simpler phrases (no run-on sentences or expensive words), in case she knows English but not very well. If you're not sure if she knows English and want to make sure she reads your letter, having it translated to Chinese is a good idea imo.

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Should I get the letter translated into Chinese and send it in both languages?

 

Yes, I think that would be a courteous thing to do. Even if the recipient reads English, it will be easier to read in her native language.

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Lynn Woods

Thanks Kenny and subsequent contributors.  Kenny has now kindly translated the letter and we'll see what joy it brings!

 

All the Best

 

Lynn

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Kenny同志

Hello Lynn,

 

I am glad I could help. We all hope you will get your refund soon. 

 

All the best,

 

Kenny

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Lu

Perhaps you already did this, but consider calling the Chinese office to make sure they received the letter and are aware of its importance.

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