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Kenny同志

educational and fun hands on sport displays

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Kenny同志
See how you measure up against Australia’s elite athletes in a range of educational and fun hands on sport displays.

 

 

Is there any of us who have been to Sportex, an interactive sports exhibition centre at Australian Institute of Sport, Canberra? 

 

I find the meaning of 'displays' somewhat vague here. What can it refer to specifically? 

 

 
“Love sport - visit the AIS!”
x.gifReviewed 15 January 2015

The tour starts with a 30 minute session in the Sportex interactive zone which is an enjoyable, hands-on experience with lots of sporting memorabilia on display. Kick a goal, ride a bike, shoot baskets (even from a wheelchair), test your reaction time, speed, strength, flexibility and jumping power are just some of the displays on offer.

 

http://www.tripadvisor.com.au/ShowUserReviews-g255057-d257628-r255710174-AIS_Australian_Institute_of_Sport-Canberra_Greater_Canberra_Australian_Capital_Te.html#REVIEWS

 

 

Sportex

Learn about sport the fun way! Sportex is an educational and engaging sports experience where you can try wheelchair basketball, virtual downhill skiing, rock climbing, football penalty shootouts, and more. Best of all, Sportex is included as part of every AIS tour.

 

http://www.ausport.gov.au/visit/tours

 

 

For what it is worth, I found these.

 

Thanks in advance for your help.

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imron

Maybe think of it a bit like what you might see at a 体验中心.  Lots of different stalls, each with different things to play around with and interact with.

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Shelley
a performance, show, or event staged for public entertainment.

 

A dictionary definition.

 

This is what I think is meant by the use of display in your text.

 

A gymnastic display, a fireworks display, a flower display.

 

Something that happens in front of an audience to show off a talent or ability.

 

The audience don't usually get involved, they are passive watchers, so I find the use here a bit odd. I would have used activities instead.

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Kenny同志

Thanks Imron. I knew it was something of that sort. I was just confused by the use of 'displays'. Quite likely, these so-called displays are what you call 'stalls', or something like that.

 

Thanks Shelley. Yes, I think a gymnastic/firework/flower display is one of the proper ways to use the word. The use of the word in that sentence is weird.

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imron

A display is something that is on display.  For example, if you go to a museum, they might have an 'ancient rome' display and an 'ancient egypt' display or whatever.

 

A display in a museum though is almost always strictly 'hands off' in that you are not allowed to touch anything, i.e. the things there are for 'display' only.  A hands-on display is a display that is designed to be touched and interacted with.

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Kenny同志

Is this an Australian usage of this word? If something is designed to be touched and interacted with, it might not be properly called a display, especially in the context of Sportex.

 

Anyway as a non-native English speaker, I have found a few badly written sentences in the document. Two examples:  'pack your swimmer and' blah blah, and 'our 60 m and 25 m pool'.

 

In Australian English, I think it should be 'pack your swimmers' or better 'pack your swimsuit'?

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imron

A display by itself is normally not something you would be allowed to touch and interact with - it is for 'display' only.  By adding 'hands on' in front, then it means it's designed to be interacted with and used with your hands.  I don't think it's Australian usage, but you'd need a speaker from somewhere else to confirm.

 

Re: swimmers.  Yes you are right, it should be swimmers not swimmer.

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Kenny同志

Uh, I see. Thanks for your explanation, Imron.

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