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Bigdumogre

Npcr - nail

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Bigdumogre

In the Npcr book one they have 丁 as nail but every resource I looked at for nail I get 钉。They are both ding1 so pronunciation is the same just writing is different. Does it matter which way you write it? Or is it a typo? Or am I just confused ?

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vellocet

Yeah, that one fooled me too.  I was corrected in public by Chinese friends when I tried it.  I don't know why NPCR deliberately misleads students like this.  My advice is to dump it and try another, more reliable textbook. 

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Shelley
Picture of a nail. Now 钉(釘) dīng is used for 'nail', with the addition of 钅(金 jīn) 'metal'.

 

This is according to wenlin.

 

It is a picture of a nail but is not used on its own to mean nail these days.

 

丁is a surname pronounced ding.

 

It might seem a bit confusing but there is no reason to

dump it and try another, more reliable textbook.

 

 

NPCR is a very good text book IMO and no textbook is perfect, so I wouldn't be so quick to throw the baby out with the bathwater and loose the good resource that it is.

 

@bigdumogre what chapter is in?

 

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Bigdumogre

This is according to wenlin.

It is a picture of a nail but is not used on its own to mean nail these days.

丁is a surname pronounced ding.

It might seem a bit confusing but there is no reason to

NPCR is a very good text book IMO and no textbook is perfect, so I wouldn't be so quick to throw the baby out with the bathwater and loose the good resource that it is.

@bigdumogre what chapter is in?

Thanks

It's in chapter 2 in the work book and text book. I'm up to chapter 7 in textbook and just started doing workbook and noticed it. Plus I rally like Npcr no reason to change it over a mistake/slightly dated for 1 word.

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roddy

"My advice is to dump it and try another, more reliable textbook. "

Such as? Anyway, like Shelley says, baby and bathwater. 

 

Watch the pronunciation of 钉 - it's one of those where the verb and noun have different tones. 

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Bigdumogre

"My advice is to dump it and try another, more reliable textbook. "

Such as? Anyway, like Shelley says, baby and bathwater.

Watch the pronunciation of 钉 - it's one of those where the verb and noun have different tones.

Thanks saw 腚 from word 擦腚纸

Production is so important, hate when people say don't learn till later

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Xiao Kui
It is a picture of a nail but is not used on its own to mean nail these days.

 

 

Used to represent a thong in  丁字裤  :wink: 

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vellocet

A mistake so basic, simple, and easy to correct makes me doubt the whole system.  I'm sure people have used this book to learn and have nostalgia for it, but it's been out for ages and I can't believe it hasn't been fixed by now. 

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Bigdumogre

A mistake so basic, simple, and easy to correct makes me doubt the whole system. I'm sure people have used this book to learn and have nostalgia for it, but it's been out for ages and I can't believe it hasn't been fixed by now.

What "perfect" books have you used to study?

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Shelley

Ok I have had a look at that chapter, what you have there is them trying to teach you component parts of characters, most of which do have a name or meaning but not all get used in isolation. I had to work this out for myself by looking up a few things and as you progress it becomes clearer.

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mandel1luke

In Classical Chinese apparently both 丁 and 钉 mean "nail". (丁 also has a host of other meanings)

 

In modern Chinese only 钉 is used.

 

I consulted 《王力古汉语字典》。It says 通”钉“ but  has only one usage in classical literature with this meaning.

 

Hope this helps.

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Bigdumogre

Thank both of you Mandel and cat lady :)

Does actually clear up a lot.

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Shelley
A mistake so basic, simple, and easy to correct makes me doubt the whole system

 

Its not a mistake, as shown by the explanations given.

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Shelley

I have just been going through lesson 10 and have realised that the way it is organised is you get some characters under the heading of "Learn and Write Basic Characters" these are the component parts of characters that later appear under the heading "Learn and Write the Chinese Characters Appearing in the Texts" these are the characters in the texts that are made from the component parts in the first section. I think the key here is the word basic.

 

This is reinforced in the workbook.

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lechuan

丁 is basically a pictogram of a nail. It's a useful character component to know. The standard character for nail, 钉, has the 'metal' component on the left side, and the 'nail' component on the right side. Learn more about character components

.

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stapler

Often they are interchangeable too. EG. 补丁 can be spelt 补钉 (or even 补靪).... though some dictionaries say the last 2 are errors, there doesn't seem to be any broad consensus.

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