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Nick Beaumont

Chinese Scallion Pancake (Cong You Bing)

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li3wei1

Nice pictures, and welcome to the forum.

 

If you can't get 葱油饼, where are you getting the 油条? Are you making that yourself? That's a recipe I would like to see. Not necessarily make, though.

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gato

I've made these with just cold water. No boiling, no sitting for 30 minutes. It still worked out great. Would save you a lot of time. Have you tried?

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889

I also love 葱油饼, even if they fall into that shamed the-oilier-the-better category.

 

But I always thought that actually frying with sesame oil was not a great idea because of the way the oil can react to heat; if you want that sesame oil flavour -- and you certainly should -- it's best to drizzle just a bit on after frying.

 

The oilier the better.

 

(The OP's dead right about proofing the dough; glad to see he included that step. Hot water brings out the gluten. Big difference in texture. Just like making pizza dough.)

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Michaelyus

I thought the hot water was to "shorten" the gluten development, giving the characteristic chew rather than the stretch of a cold-water dough pancake. Same thing with 饺子皮.

 

Source.

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abcdefg

Looks real good. Thanks for posting and welcome.

 

I buy 葱油饼 here in Kunming, but haven't tried making them myself since they are easy to find and cheap. The vendors here typically make large ones and will cut you off the amount you want by weight. They are sold fresh and hot. One or two kuai 块钱 worth is enough for me as a snack if I'm walking around alone.

 

And I think your blog is clever!

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Nick Beaumont

I used to buy the on my way home from work as well back in Shanghai - I used to eat so many I wasn't hungry by the time I got home!

 

If anyone wants a way to make these a little faster, I found this recipe on China Sichuan Food - http://www.chinasichuanfood.com/chinese-scallion-pancake-simplified-version/

 

I really failed when I followed this recipe (too much water perhaps), but hopefully you will have more luck.

 

Thanks for the compliment on the blog and pictures! I've found some great recipes on this site so looking forward to cooking them :)

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abcdefg
I've found some great recipes on this site so looking forward to cooking them

 

I contribute cooking articles from time to time, but my orientation is different from yours in that I mainly try to explain to people living here in China how to navigate the wet markets and food sections of the supermarkets to find fresh, seasonal, high quality ingredients for not too high a cost. Then I enjoy working out simple, home-style recipes that show how to showcase these tasty local items, with emphasis on doing it in a reasonably healthy manner. Plus, living in Kunming, I like Yunnan-style dishes and special regional ingredients, so I often highlight those.

 

The food pages of the forum aren't terribly active, and you are welcome to contribute any time you'd like. And good on you for keeping your girlfriend well fed! That is always a commendable mission!

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889

That recipe suggests adding five-spice powder. I don't think I've ever tasted five-spice powder in 葱油饼. Is it often there and I've missed it?

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abcdefg

@889 -- I've never encountered it either, anywhere in China. (That of course doesn't mean someone somewhere isn't using it. Just that it isn't very popular. or mainstream.)

 

I also quickly scanned the top six authentic 葱油饼 recipes on Baidu, and didn't see 五香粉 listed as an ingredient.

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889

Thanks for that research.

 

Again, I don't know what really goes into the food I eat in China -- I don't think it's a very healthy pre-occupation -- but always suspect when I eat a particularly crisp and flavourful 葱油饼 that it's been made with lard. Or in Western terms, a bit of bacon grease, perhaps

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