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somethingfunny

Grammar Question

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somethingfunny

I was going to be more specific in the title about the bit of grammar this is, but I can't remember.  I looked around and I'm still not sure which category it falls into.  I learnt all of this type of grammar in Chinese without knowing much about it in English, the result is that I can use it pretty well but I've got no idea what it actually is.  (I think in the case it's something to do with expressing degree of completion) 

 

Anyway, my question is pretty simple and shouldn't take much to clear it up:

 

I'm reading something where someone is editing video footage and there is a scene they are not sure about including.  Finally, we have this sentence:

 

最终她剪了上去

 

Does this mean that she decided to include the scene?  My confusion is because 剪 is cut (implying remove) whereas the bit of grammar 上去 strongly implies addition.  My translation would be something like, "In the end, she decided to cut it (the scene) in".  I guess this just comes down to the technical meaning of 剪 in video editing and whether it can be used to mean both 'cut in' and 'cut out'.

 

Thanks.

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Xiao Kui

I would come to the same conclusion as you, but I'm not a native speaker. also curious as to what the correct translation would be.

From the following example I found by googling "剪上去“ it seems like it can also mean to insert a scene that was not included in the original:

https://tieba.baidu.com/p/5116042489

 

"你们确认那些是专业观众,而不是直接从别的节目里剪上去的片段"

 

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Luxi

 

5 hours ago, somethingfunny said:

 

I was going to be more specific in the title about the bit of grammar this is, but I can't remember.

 

I think the bit of grammar may be the complement of result

5 hours ago, somethingfunny said:

最终她剪了上去

 

I would have read it along the lines of 'she went ahead and cut', but am not 100% sure because I'm in the middle of something else and my mind isn't quite here right now :cry:

 

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lips

Short tor 剪接。

 

Not really a grammar question.

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Lu

I agree with Lips. As I read it, it's not a grammar matter but a vocab question. 剪 in itself means 'to cut', but 剪輯 means 'to edit', and that then is abbreviated to just 剪, still meaning 'to edit'.

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realmayo

= "Finally she edited it out" ?

with 上去 read as: cmp. ②(indicating outward or forward direction)

 

Without something like ...上去, would there be any way of distinguishing between 剪 as either she "edited it" and she "edited it out" ?

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somethingfunny

If we take it as the scene being kept then it's interesting that its 剪上去 rather than 剪进去.  I guess it would be the difference in English between "edit it on" and "edit it in".  But the acceptable form seems to be the other way around.

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Lu

For 'editing out', I'd expect something with 出 or perhaps 撤.

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somethingfunny

Yeah, so if you use 出 for editing out, then why isn't it 进 for editing in?

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dwq

For editing out, it would be 她剪去了那个片段 or 她剪掉了那个片段 .

 

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Luxi

But 剪 is not 'edit', it's N. scissors, etc. V. to cut

 

Quote

 

         
剪  jiǎn ① scissors ② shears ③ clippers ④ CL:把[ba3] ⑤ to cut with scissors ⑥ to trim ⑦ to wipe out or exterminate     
    CC-CEDICT

 

 

How does one cut something in--to something else? I've been told many times that verbal complements can be quite sloppy.

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stapler

I immediately read it as "cut it out" with 剪 as cut and 上去 as a verbal complement meaning to fall and go away. But I think I'm focused too much on the 去 rather than the 上

 

Edit: I asked a native speaker. They wanted to know more about the context. As best they could tell it meant cut and add back in.

 

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dwq
5 hours ago, Luxi said:

How does one cut something in--to something else?

As Lips and Lu said, 剪 in 剪上去 is an abbreviated 剪接 (literally cut-and-paste) or 剪辑 , so the actual operation can be thought as a piece of film is 剪 cut somewhere else and 接上去 pasted into the gap (connecting the two sides) where the insertion is made.

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