Jump to content
Chinese-forums.com
Learn Chinese in China

Jockster

How to input pinyin u: using MS IME

Recommended Posts

Jockster

Hi,

It turns out that I'm incompatible with Microsoft's PinYin IME 3.0. I can't figure out how to input u:, as in 女 nu:, or 旅行 lu:3 xing2. There must be a really simple solution :wall ; I looked in the help file and on the net, but no luck. :help

Thanks in advance,

Jockster

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Site Sponsors:
Pleco for iPhone / Android iPhone & Android Chinese dictionary: camera & hand- writing input, flashcards, audio.
Study Chinese in Kunming 1-1 classes, qualified teachers and unique teaching methods in the Spring City.
Learn Chinese Characters Learn 2289 Chinese Characters in 90 Days with a Unique Flash Card System.
Hacking Chinese Tips and strategies for how to learn Chinese more efficiently
Popup Chinese Translator Understand Chinese inside any Windows application, website or PDF.
Chinese Grammar Wiki All Chinese grammar, organised by level, all in one place.

gato

Type 'v' for the ü, young man. There's no 'v' sound in Chinese pinyin, so some clever fellow found a use for it.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jockster

谢谢您!Like I suspected, a very simple solution, once you *know* it. Stupid me, didn't think of that, of course "u:" is represented by "v". :lol: Thanks, Microsoft.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
perjp

In fact, using v to mean ü is almost universal in all sorts of Chinese input methods. Many young Chinese whose only exposure to pinyin is through various computer and cellphone input methods seem to think that v is in fact the standard way of writing ü. I've seen people use v when writing pinyin on paper as well...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alveranter

yeah.. that's the question :)

using the ms IME ordinary input.. (although I use taiwan hanyu input), how to write for instance 女? I have tried so many combinations.. am I as stupid as it seems? :) n + y doesn't work, which I find pretty strange..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
citambulos

How do I type the lü like in lüyou with intelligent pinyin???

thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
roddy

Merged with just a small selection of the previous versions of this question :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ParkeNYU

I think that 'v' should just replace 'ü' in Hanyu Pinyin altogether. After all, 'v' and 'u' were historically allographs, so the reassignment is visually intuitive. Thanks to Unicode diacritics, it is possible to add tone marks to 'v': V̄ V́ V̌ V̀ v̄ v́ v̌ v̀. This arrangement is more legible than the current one, which is difficult to read in small fonts due to the density of components: Ǖ Ǘ Ǚ Ǜ ǖ ǘ ǚ ǜ. The common practice of replacing the cumbersome 'ü' with 'v' isn't even limited to input methods; 'v' (in place of 'ü') can be seen on official signage in the PRC as well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
imron

Not just signage, passports also.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
liuzhou

I can't remember which input systems, but I have also seen some which require 'uu' to get 'ü'.

 

In the old NJStar days both, 'nv' and 'nuu' worked.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ParkeNYU

I think I'll just stubbornly use 'v' for all instances of 'ü' just to see if any native speakers fail to understand (highly doubtful). Although I can't provide any hard evidence, it seems that toneless Hanyu Pinyin inputs are currently the most popular IMEs for writing Chinese in the world (by a significant margin). If this is indeed the case, most of these pinyin users will find the 'v' substitution to be quite natural.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Auberon

 

I think that 'v' should just replace 'ü' in Hanyu Pinyin altogether. After all, 'v' and 'u' were historically allographs, so the reassignment is visually intuitive.

 

Why not actually make u and ü phonetic too, while you're at it. Replacing ü with v but not doing the same in in words like 'qu' where the sound is the same would seem a wasted opportunity.

Personally, however, I find ü more visually intuitive (overlooking the fact that nobody knows how to type it on an English keyboard), because it represents the same sound in German.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ParkeNYU

It's not so much the typing issue as it is the doubled diacritics necessary to write a toned 'ü'.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and select your username and password later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Click here to reply. Select text to quote.

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...