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Tofu and ham 火腿香煎豆腐

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Shelley

Looks really tasty, a winter warmer.

 

I have never knowingly had tofu. Is it something i would be safe to try with my nut allergies, I realise you can't answer that with 100% certainty but what I mean is it it usual practice to use any nuts in the making, storing, packing or flavouring of tofu. Or is it just plain and ready for you to add you own flavours.

 

I get the impression that tofu is a bit like China's version of cheese in as much as it has many varieties, and ways of using it.

 

Thanks again.

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abcdefg

Thanks, Shelley.

 

14 minutes ago, Shelley said:

I have never knowingly had tofu. Is it something i would be safe to try with my nut allergies, I realise you can't answer that with 100% certainty but what I mean is it it usual practice to use any nuts in the making, storing, packing or flavouring of tofu.

 

I don't think that nuts are ever used in making plain tofu. It is just soybeans and water. Soy milk 豆浆 is allowed to form curd, which is pressed into blocks. Nourishing and healthy. So popular in China that supermarkets and appliance stores here even sell small counter-top machines for making it at home. (I've never tried that.)

 

Here's a pretty good overview: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tofu 

 

You are right about it coming in lots of varieties. My neighborhood wet market probably has a dozen or more kinds. It's also a very versatile food, and can become either savory or sweet according to how it is handled.

 

Must confess I never ate much of it before coming to China. It kind of grows on you. Good stuff!

 

 

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Shelley

"The term tofu is used by extension for similarly textured curdled dishes that do not use soy products, such as "almond tofu" (almond jelly), tamago-dōfu (ja) (egg), goma-dōfu (ja) (sesame), or peanut tofu (Chinese 落花生豆腐 luòhuāshēng dòufu and Okinawan jīmāmi-dōfu (ja)). "

 

Above quote from the wiki article link you shared.

WHAAAAAA!!!! Oh heck. Now I will have to be really careful. If they make any of the nutty ones at the same place it won't be good.

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abcdefg

Those aren't really tofu. They just misuse the name in order to link it to something familiar. They would not ordinarily be made by a tofu producer.

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Shelley

I get that but its the cross contamination that worries me. Have you ever seen these nutty versions? Are they common? Are they made in different places?

 

So many questions, so little tofu:shock:

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abcdefg

I understand your concern, Shelley.

 

There are ways to make tofu at home. I've seen it done. More trouble of course.

 

Not sure I've ever seen those almond and peanut products here in Kunming, though they surely exist. They aren't carried by the tofu sellers I visit. I think they would be more likely found in a sweets or pastry shop.

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Shelley

Oh well I will see what I can find to experiment with. Thanks for your help.

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Alex_Hart

I've asked all three of my tofu selling aunties about all their varieties of tofu, and none of them ever had a nut tofu (I went on the hunt for tempeh, a favorite of mine, and never found it. Tempeh often includes nuts when sold in the United States). Having said that, I wouldn't necessarily trust a Chinese kitchen to not have nuts nearby. 

 

However, you're in the UK. Back home in NYC, I can see how it might be popular to add nuts or use nut milk to make it, but American labeling laws are rather more stringent than Chinese and our tofu boxes label "made in a facility with nuts" etc. 

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Shelley

That true Alex, hadn't thought about that, I will be buying in a country that has strict labelling laws.

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