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dxcarnadi

的 .. what for?

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dxcarnadi

Hello

In a Chinese text book I find these sentences.
.
.
你太浪费了!
你以为钱是好赚的吗?
你自己去找个工作就知道钱好不好赚!

 

What (grammatical) role has 的 in the second sentence?
Can somebody explain to me?
Thank you.

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DavyJonesLocker

Looks like a 是 ..... 的 Construction to me for emphasising the bit in the middle.

 

The 是 is optional I believe.

好 before the verb means "easy to do (the verb)"

 

Long time since I've studied grammar bit there are a lot of grammar gurus on here

 Let's wait for their explanation .

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Publius

Yes, it's the shi...de construction.

If you want to go more technical, it's a kind of cleft sentence.

If you want to go really technical, 'de' in the shi...de construction is a nominalizer. It's a particle that turns a verbal phrase into a noun phrase (because the Chinese copula 'shi' only accepts a noun as complement).

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dxcarnadi

Hello Publius

 

Thank you for the comprehensive information.
What do you mean with "technical"? ;-)
I've read "all" pointers.
I'm curious how the Mandarin Chinese language really works ..
I'm a German electrical/software engineer. Technical. But Not a linguist.

 

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dxcarnadi

Hello Publius

 

I've read your thread/forum-post above  .. all .. with interest .. without understanding.

You wrote
"Two is that Chinese is pro-drop. It's meaning-oriented."

What is "meaning-oriented" in detail? .. Yip used it also.
Can you give me some Chinese sentences as example?

 

I searched the Internet .. but I don't find explanation for "meaning-oriented".
Have you other words/names for it? A linguistic name?

 

Can you give titles of Chinese Grammar books from mainland China .. in bilingual .. Chinese/English?

Maybe I can order from Germany.
Thank you.
 

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Angelina
On 4/6/2018 at 8:03 PM, Publius said:

Two is that Chinese is pro-drop. It's meaning-oriented. Anything that can be inferred need not to be expressed. This includes subject, object, and virtually any part of a sentence. 

 

@dxcarnadi

 

https://www.sprachforschung.uni-wuppertal.de/fileadmin/linguistik/rathert/Kolloquien/WS12_13/HandoutBisang.pdf

 

 

On 4/6/2018 at 8:03 PM, Publius said:

Three is that rhythm plays a big role in Chinese. Seldom do we find a language in which the number of syllables in a word determines the syntactic structure around it. Chinese is such a language.

 

https://repository.upenn.edu/dissertations/AAI9543073/

 

 

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dxcarnadi

Hello (Publius)

 

After reading & understanding your discourse on f.e. attributive .. now I read mainly .. In China published Chinese grammar books with Chinese examples (but without English translation).
Translation "could falsify" the original examples.
Only the explanation is bilingual.

 

For example .. I didn't know that Chinese does not have a word for "my".
--> (Noun) (attributive-marker DE) (Noun)

 

Thank you.

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