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abcdefg

Liang ban 凉拌 -- The Chinese equivalent of salad. 四季豆杏鲍菇凉拌

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mungouk

Great stuff, @abcdefg!  Maybe I should just come and stay with you in Kunming 😉

Regarding soup/broth — is there an easy way of detecting (or probably asking) whether it contains meat?  I had some nice crab wonton in Suzhou recently, but half-way through realised they were cooked in pork broth.  I don't eat meat.

 

 

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Shelley

@mungoukI don't think you can. There have been other post in some of abcdefg's posts that discuss this and it seems that restaurants etc think its ok even if you are vegetarian, it won't hurt for you to have little meat. 

 

If you ask they may lie unknowingly, they might think it doesn't contain meat but it does, or they just plain don't know or even don't care. I have asked this question about nuts as I have an allergy and I have decided that its just not safe to trust them, this is one reason I have never actually been to China and why I probably will never go, I would either starve or get poisoned:shock:

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abcdefg
7 hours ago, mungouk said:

Maybe I should just come and stay with you in Kunming

 

Thanks, @mungouk -- You would definitely be welcome to visit! 

 

2 hours ago, Shelley said:

There have been other post in some of abcdefg's posts that discuss this and it seems that restaurants etc think its ok even if you are vegetarian, it won't hurt for you to have little meat. 

 

@Shelley is right about this being an ongoing challenge. It requires a discussion with the waiter or maybe even with the cook. The reality of the situation is that the restaurant probably starts a tall stock pot bubbling on a back burner in the morning when they open for business. It's typical to add various soup bones and compatible vegetable scraps to it throughout the day, topping up the water to keep the pot from running dry. This is then used to form the base of many actual soups and to add a ladle or two  to dishes which are being stewed 焖 in a covered wok as needed. 

 

Best bet is to make it abundantly clear that you don't eat any kind of meat or meat products in any form. It's not enough to just say "I'm vegetarian" and let it go at that. 我吃素。Also, specifically request your soup be made with 清水 qingshui/plain water instead of with 高汤 gaotang/stock. 

 

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These long beans are so versatile and easy to use that they have become one of my "go to" items when I want to change up the vegetable rotation in my kitchen. I often buy some, clean, cut and parboil them for a couple minutes and then stir fry them with garlic, ginger, onions, ground meat and chilies.  

 

Can use half the bunch like that and keep the remainder in the fridge several days, eventually using them in a soup with mushrooms and chicken. They also work well with fresh corn. 

 

Several famous Sichuan recipes feature them, most notably 干煸四季豆。It is difficult to make this dish properly at home, and I usually order it in a Sichuan restaurant instead. 

 

 

 

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Bibu
On 8/22/2018 at 6:20 AM, abcdefg said:

You would definitely be welcome to visit! 

 is there a waiting list?

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abcdefg

No waiting list, @Bibu -- You are welcome too!

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oceancalligraphy

Is it always necessary to blanche vegetables when preparing 凉拌?Or is it dependent on the type of vegetables? I don't remember blanching 黃瓜 because the centers would not be crisp.

 

 

On 8/21/2018 at 3:20 PM, abcdefg said:

Best bet is to make it abundantly clear that you don't eat any kind of meat or meat products in any form. It's not enough to just say "I'm vegetarian" and let it go at that. 我吃素。Also, specifically request your soup be made with 清水 qingshui/plain water instead of with 高汤 gaotang/stock. 

 

Does 齋 hold any weight in China? I think the proper translation is Jain vegetarianism. It's much stricter than vegetarianism, but I wonder if that would get the point across about no meat products whatsoever. 

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abcdefg
21 hours ago, oceancalligraphy said:

Is it always necessary to blanche vegetables when preparing 凉拌?Or is it dependent on the type of vegetables? I don't remember blanching 黃瓜 because the centers would not be crisp.

 

Glad you asked. It's not necessary to blanch vegetables which are already tender, such as cucumbers. But these long beans 四季豆 are too tough and fibrous to chew unless they are precooked a little bit. Same would go for lotus root in a salad. Here's an example of that: https://www.chinese-forums.com/forums/topic/49345-hot-weather-eats-lotus-root-salad-藕片凉拌/ 

 

Some other vegetables, such as eggplant, aren't really tough but are still usually precooked, often steamed, to give them a pleasant silky texture or mouth feel 口感。Here's an example of that: https://www.chinese-forums.com/forums/topic/56568-steamed-eggplant-with-garlic-vinaigrette-蒜蓉蒸茄子/ 

 

21 hours ago, oceancalligraphy said:

Does 齋 hold any weight in China? I think the proper translation is Jain vegetarianism. It's much stricter than vegetarianism, but I wonder if that would get the point across about no meat products whatsoever. 

 

I'm not sure. Probably best for someone who is vegetarian to answer. (I eat everything as long as it tastes good.) 

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