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mkqq

Major headache with Birth Certificate seeking advice

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mkqq

Hi all,

 

I am 30 years old and have been living in New Zealand since I was 10, and became a NZ citizen in 2002.

 

I have accepted a job in the Netherlands and the Dutch Government requires a Birth Certificate that is first Legalised by the Chinese Foreign Affairs, and then by the Dutch Embassy in China. Despite the fact that I've been a NZ citizen for almost 20 years, they still require the process to be done in China as the Birth Certificate originated from China.

 

Doing some research the process is complicated but doable. Both mine and my parent's Hukou were deregistered when we became NZ citizens, so the first step is to get a certificate of my birth from the Public Security Bureau. Then it needs to be notarised and sent to the Chinese Foreign Affairs to be legalised, and finally onto the Dutch Embassy.

 

The first step is where the headache is. My dad's Hokou was with a different Public Bureau. Hence the Security Bureau can only put my name and my mother's name onto the certificate. We are told that it is not possible to put my dad's name onto the certificate, since his Hukou was with a different Bureau, and has been deregistered.

 

We called the Notary and they will not notarise the certificate with only my name and my mother's name on it.

 

So as the situation stands now it seems impossible to provide the Dutch government what they need. I know they allow you three months to produce an acceptable Birth Certificate but if it's flat out impossible what can I do? 

 

Desperately seeking some advice here. Would appreciate any assistance.

 

Many thanks

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5 hours ago, mkqq said:

Dutch Government requires a Birth Certificate that is first Legalised by the Chinese Foreign Affairs,

 

Now, are you absolutely sure this is the only document they will accept?

 

I ask because I recently met someone who could not get her original birth certificate from China which was needed for issuing a birth certificate for her child in Switzerland. she herself had emigrated to Australia as a child. Somehow, she found out another document issued in Australia with respect to her status would be sufficient (a lesser known route).

 

There are people who cannot obtain original birth certificates due to war or possibly adoption. What happens to them?

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NinjaTurtle

mkqq,

I am wondering if hiring an agent or a lawyer in China would help.

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mkqq

We did contact an agency but their job is to coordinate the legalization of the document with the China Foreign Affairs and the Dutch Embassy in China.

 

Before that we need to provide the certificate from the Public Security Bureau. This is the part we are stuck on. The Security Bureau and can't produce a document with both my parent's names on it, and the Notary won't notarize it unless it has both of my parent's names on it.

 

What other agency could possibly assist with this?

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Luxi
1 hour ago, mkqq said:

What other agency could possibly assist with this?

 

Ask these people, they may be able to give you the name of an organization or agency to contact in your case:

https://www.chinalawblog.com/

 

Good luck!

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edelweis
On 10/9/2018 at 1:10 PM, mkqq said:

We called the Notary and they will not notarise the certificate with only my name and my mother's name on it.

 

Is it a Chinese notary?

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889

Only the Chinese notary could provide this service. Notary offices are government establishments under the Ministry of Justice, and for a service like this, there's only one office in town that handles it. No shopping possible.

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edelweis

Maybe ask the Chinese notary for advice about how to get both parents on the same birth certificate and/or whether they would accept notarizing the single-parent one if it was accompanied by a marriage certificate or something.

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roddy

For citizenship applications, there's a route. Not sure if it'd apply for a work visa. 

 

Good luck. 

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mkqq

The company in the Netherlands seems quite relaxed about the situation and tells me not to worry. I have 3-4 months from date of registration to produce an acceptable certificate and they said that even after this time nothing will happen as long as I keep them updated.

 

I am still worried because what if I simply cannot produce what they need even if they give me the next 10 years? I am also aware of the Lack of Documentation route, but I'm not sure if it's applicable for a Residence Permit.

 

I will try the suggestions above.

 

I'm getting a taste of the Dutch Bureaucracy even arriving! Looking at some other countries Sweden for example there is no need for a Birth Certificate, a passport would suffice.

 

 

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陳德聰

I’m not sure I am understanding the full situation.

 

I assume you are one of the millions of people who never had a birth certificate in the first place, so whatever document is being produced is just something typed up in Microsoft Word and stamped in red afterward. It seems you can’t go the hukou route, but how about getting the hospital where you were born to produce such a Word document based on the info provided by your parents, and then take that to the Notary?

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Lu
8 hours ago, mkqq said:

I'm getting a taste of the Dutch Bureaucracy even arriving! Looking at some other countries Sweden for example there is no need for a Birth Certificate, a passport would suffice.

Yah, my country's immigration procedures are a pain. I'm sorry, if that is of any use to you. You could try calling the IND (or whichever organisation wants your birth certificate) to ask whether the 'no documentation' route is an option in your case. But even if it is, that route is an enourmous hassle, as I understand it.

 

Since you say Sweden is easier... Is there any chance you can come through another EU country and come to the Netherlands from there?

 

Apart from asking here, perhaps you can consider asking at a forum dedicated to discussing immigration and other visa to the EU. They might have more ideas.

 

Good luck, I hope you can find a relatively easy solution.

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