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Christa

Orange and orange juice - what do you say?

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Christa

Hi guys,

 

It's been a long time since I've asked a food / drink question, so how about this rather basic one:

 

How do you say "orange" and "orange juice"?

 

I tend to say either 橙子 or 柳橙 for orange and 橙汁 or  柳橙汁 for orange juice. Do you say it in one of these ways or some other way? And do either of the ways I say it seem weird to you?

 

Be interested to hear what you think...

 

 

Christa

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somethingfunny

橙子 for orange

橙汁 for orange juice

 

Thats all I've ever used.

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Christa

Interesting. Well, that's two. Anyone else care to chip in?

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Flickserve

 

6 hours ago, Christa said:

 for orange

 

More common in Taiwan? 

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yueni

橙子 and 橙汁

 

I only just recently came across 柳橙汁, but it was easy enough to understand what it was.

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KurodaRie

橙子 for orange

橙汁 for orange juice

 

But I just recalled that I use 橘子 more often when I searched Wikipedia

 

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DavyJonesLocker

橙汁 and 橙子 is what I hear . It seems say 橙汁 on the cartons I buy however, I do see there are one or two  advertised as 柳橙汁 on the shopping apps (JD) It doesn't seem to be anywhere near as common as 橙汁 though. 

 

The word 脐橙 is used a lot on the apps but that's just to distinguish which type of orange. Most people just say 橙子 I'd imagine . Not sure what happens in other parts of the country.

 

 

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abcdefg

橙子 and 橙汁 = general terms

 

We get many kinds of oranges here, each has its own name. Eating oranges, juice oranges, navel oranges, blood oranges, small Mandarin oranges, and so on. Then there are tangerines 橘子 -- several kinds of those as well. 

 

Now is the time for these citrus fruits in Kunming, late fall/early winter. See lots and lots; prices low. 

 

Don't forget 柚子 (English = pomelo.) 

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Christa
2 hours ago, abcdefg said:

We get many kinds of oranges here, each has its own name. Eating oranges, juice oranges, navel oranges, blood oranges, small Mandarin oranges, and so on. Then there are tangerines 橘子 -- several kinds of those as well. 

 

Curiously, I recall often seeing in textbooks orange juice being translated as 桔子水. But that has always seemed very odd to me - especially as, as you say, 桔子 are tangerines.

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abcdefg

A couple years ago I was buying oranges in the nearby outdoor market, paused a minute and watched a middle aged lady do her orange shopping first. She passed over the variety I was planning to buy, and picked some less attractive ones nearby. I asked her why. "Oh, if you eat too many of those, its easy to wind up suffering from excess internal heat (很容易上火)。These are safer from that standpoint early in the winter. In late winter, however, the situation reverses because true cold weather oranges have a slightly different chemical profile even though they taste similar." 

 

"OK, thanks," I said, realizing that I still had a huge amount to learn.   

 

The line between tangerines and oranges is usually obvious, but not always. They are smaller than most oranges, have thinner, wrinkly skin which is more easily peeled using just your fingers. But clementines and mandarin oranges can muddy the water. And the names of the various orange-colored citrus fruits differ from one place to another. The same thing grown in Hunan has a different name from when it is grown in Guangdong. 蜜桔 and 柑橘 is an example of such an arbitrary naming convention. 

 

These terminology variations really don't matter much, in my opinion. I realize, however, @Christa, that you have special requirements in that regard. (smile)

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Flickserve
On 11/5/2018 at 8:42 AM, yueni said:

only just recently came across 柳橙汁, but it was easy enough to understand what it was.

 

I heard it on Glossika, the Taiwan version. 

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Christa
On 11/6/2018 at 12:29 AM, abcdefg said:

 

These terminology variations really don't matter much, in my opinion. I realize, however, @Christa, that you have special requirements in that regard.

 

Indeed!

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mungouk

Please allow me to infect your brains with this classic 1980s slice of Scottish pop music... so highly-regarded that it's been adopted as the title of as exhibition at the national museum of Scotland.


One of my favourite tunes ever.  Oh btw it's by a legendary band called "Orange Juice". 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ESy-Z8vqMrE

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Flickserve
On 11/5/2018 at 12:34 AM, Christa said:

 

I tend to say either 橙子 or 柳橙 for orange and 橙汁 or  柳橙汁 for orange juice. Do you say it in one of these ways or some other way? And do either of the ways I say it seem weird to you?

 

You are going to have to put me out of my misery. How did you hear of 柳橙汁?

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