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Chinese chicken curry 咖喱鸡肉

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Luxi

Very nice presentation! Thank you for all the trouble you take in your posts.

Sadly, I never have all the required spices and if I do, chances are they are very old and probably not very healthy. Much easier for me to open a jar with a good Malaysian or Singaporean curry sauce. Even Marks & Spencer's have quite decent ones. I still admire your presentations very much.

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abcdefg

Appreciate your kind words, @Luxi -- I'm truly fortunate to have easy access to lots of prime fresh ingredients here. 

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大肚男

Very nicely done.

 

This is one of my go to recipes, and if you make too much, it freezes nicely.

 

I usually make a hyge pot on a weekend and vacuum seal it to to take to work for lunch over 5-7 meals.

 

 

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abcdefg
11 hours ago, 大肚男 said:

I usually make a hyge pot on a weekend and vacuum seal it to to take to work for lunch over 5-7 meals.

 

Thanks, 大肚。If I were making this in the US, I would probably use boneless chicken thighs. (They aren't offered in supermarkets here so far as I've ever seen .) 

 

Do you use curry powder or curry blocks in the US? I see hard-core gourmet articles urging me to make my own from scratch, toasting and grinding up all the requisite exotic leaves and seeds and pods. Never tried it; probably won't unless I were to somehow be convinced it was worth the extra trouble. 

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歐博思

I end up getting Chinese food after every one of your food posts. Looks delicious!

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abcdefg
8 hours ago, 歐博思 said:

I end up getting Chinese food after every one of your food posts. Looks delicious!

 

Haha! Thanks for posting. Do you ever try making these dishes at home? This recipe has more moving parts than some, but doesn't contain any "critical steps" that must be done just exactly right to prevent disaster. If you feel inspired to try, I'd be glad to talk you through any snags or problem areas. 

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Alex_Hart

A great looking recipe, abcd! There are chicken curry restaurants popping up all over the place now. When I first arrived 2-3 years ago, it was 麻辣烫 and 麻辣香锅 on every corner. Now, many of these places have closed down and are being replaced with chicken or beef curry. It seems to be really popular with the 外卖 crowd, too. I often see my Chinese classmates getting it - smells great when they open the box.

 

I've never had it in a Chinese restaurant nor made Chinese curry. The pastes/sauces usually have chicken or beef in them, but I often make Thai curry at home. I've never had an apple in a curry before, though. This sounds pretty interesting; is it typical in Chinese curries?

 

11 hours ago, abcdefg said:

Do you use curry powder or curry blocks in the US? I see hard-core gourmet articles urging me to make my own from scratch, toasting and grinding up all the requisite exotic leaves and seeds and pods. Never tried it; probably won't unless I were to somehow be convinced it was worth the extra trouble. 

I've made curry pastes (Thai) with a pestle and mortar several times. Handmade pastes add a lot more flavor and a nuance that the storebought ones lack, and I keep a pretty huge spice cabinet in my kitchen so I never really have the problem of having to buy spices, but you are right. It is a lot of extra trouble. I have many Thai friends who say their mothers do it weekly, but I can't imagine myself doing it for anything other than a special occasion. I imagine it's relatively similar to the Chinese curry blocks. I'd suggest you try it at least once if your spice cabinet permits. It is also a good work out!

11 hours ago, 大肚男 said:

I usually make a hyge pot on a weekend and vacuum seal it to to take to work for lunch over 5-7 meals.

 

2

Do you vacuum seal it in bowls or just in a bag, e.g. when you get to the office, do you just pour it into a bowl from the bag? I've never had a vacuum sealer, but this sounds cool. 

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大肚男
10 minutes ago, Alex_Hart said:

Do you vacuum seal it in bowls or just in a bag, e.g. when you get to the office, do you just pour it into a bowl from the bag? I've never had a vacuum sealer, but this sounds 

 

I vacuum seal in a bag. Pop the bag in the microwave for couple of minutes.cut the top and pour over some steamed rice.

 

I use foodsaver bags that I get from Costco. Which. I also use to sous vide.

 

On their website, Foodsaver say these bags are safe to microwave.

 

Hope this helps.

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abcdefg

I use a vacuum sealer in the US. Very handy. 

 

6 hours ago, Alex_Hart said:

I've never had an apple in a curry before, though. This sounds pretty interesting; is it typical in Chinese curries?

 

I'm not sure whether it's typical or not. Kind of doubt it. Read several Chinese recipes early on which suggested that addition, so I shamelessly adopted it as my own. 

 

Lots of the curry sauces on sale at Walmart were marked "Japanese Style" 日式。Not sure why. 

 

1596622350_IMG_20181209_102557(3)-36-70.thumb.jpg.687ddfb8a79727941bdcd299997515a3.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reading up on curry just now shows a huge variety of approaches. I even found one article calling it "The national dish of England." 

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Bibu
21 hours ago, abcdefg said:

Curries don't have a venerable ancient dynastic history

 

In a Chinese mind, curry is always Indian, noting to do with local flavor. Anyhow, I guess the curry powder/block is  more JP style/flavor after I eat around North India and South India. In fact, south India curry is far from what eat here or in JP everyday.

 

I have a wild guess that  Curry is brought to south-southeast Asia by British Indian and finally it's part of the Navy's daily supply, tasty and full of energy, easy to carry and stock .that's for the seaman's.

 

JP was learning everything from Europe since 186x, and Navy is the focal point for sure. The great example for JP navy is of course British Navy at the time being. That is the impression when I visited the Navy's academy of Japan in  Hiroshima  years ago,  found out half of the dishes in Canting is curry....

 

BTW, China is following JP in all aspects since 19xx, lot of new words till today we took from Japanese Kanji to represent new things, They are our teachers, the characters writes the same,  why not borrow?

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abcdefg
17 hours ago, Bibu said:

I have a wild guess that  Curry is brought to south-southeast Asia by British Indian and finally it's part of the Navy's daily supply, tasty and full of energy, easy to carry and stock .that's for the seaman's.

 

Yes, that makes good sense. Thanks. 

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ChTTay

Definitely nothing to do with the navy eating curry. You are correct that the navy will have had a big role but only because of the spice trade and helping to maintain the British empire. 

 

Stretching from the empire up until present day Britain has had and still has Indian immigrants. Of course, over time they become British themselves.. so much so this is the largest minorrit ethnic group in the U.K.  Of course they brought their food with them. This was eventually adapted slightly for local tastes (although not always) and it took off. Curry is the most popular food in Britain according to various surveys and reports; thus it got the title of “the national dish”. It is true that there seem to be Indian restaurants and curry houses in every town or decent sized village in the U.K.. 

 

Back to China... I think it’s labelled as Japanese for marketing purposes. Also because Japanese curry isn’t like Indian or South East Asian and likely to be more agreeable to the Chinese palette .  Japanese curry is quite well know throughout SE Asia and usually served as just a curry sauce on a deep fried cutlet and rice. 

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abcdefg
18 minutes ago, ChTTay said:

Curry is the most popular food in Britain according to various surveys and reports; thus it got the title of “the national dish”. It is true that there seem to be Indian restaurants and curry houses in every town or decent sized village in the U.K.. 

 

I had seen a reference to this, but wasn't sure it was still true today. Good to have a "local view." Thanks. 

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Bibu

@ChTTay

 

No argue , just more wild guess. Here is some background. You should learned some mandarin, so tell me do you recognize these words? what common aspects among the below words

 

电话”、“干部”、“艺术”、“否定”、“肯定”、“假设[注 1]、“海拔”、“直接”、“杂志”、“防疫”、“法人”、“航空母舰

  • ~团。例:工团、法团
  • ~力。例:购买力
  • ~型。例:大型、小型
  • ~场。例:现场、广场
  • ~法。
  • ~性。
  • ~制。
  • ~主义。
  • ~会。

 

 

The only thing i can not agree the British spice trade, it is OPIUM!!!!!!!

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ChTTay
2 hours ago, Bibu said:

it is OPIUM!!!!!!!

 

Pretty sure no opium these days. Not on that level anyway. 

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Michaelyus

It ought to be noted that Japanese カレー karē has always been thought of as 洋食 yōshoku, Western-inspired food introduced during the Meiji Restoration, and was introduced to Japan by the British navy, through the medium of a standard curry powder mix based on a flour- and butter-based roux. Thus they are very much a thick sauce with a relatively low spice level for an Indian palate. Throughout the Indian subcontinent, "curry" is basically tantamount to saying sauce (the English word comes from Tamil கறி kaṟi).

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L1ZM5JIsdYA 
The legendary Rick Stein.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KKEIhxN3bMQ
Begin Japanology: Curry.

 

EDIT: The use of apple is dead giveaway for a Japanese-inspired curry, as based on Victorian British recipes (e.g. Mrs. Beeton's Curried Fowl). These were superseded in Britain by a range of North Indian curries post-WW2 (+ substantial innovation).

 

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Bibu
13 hours ago, Michaelyus said:

"curry" is basically tantamount to saying sauce

good point , sauce rather than spice..... it is a mixture of many thing , especially in south Indian, majority is vegetarian, curry is the sauce for rice in a simple meal: you mix green or red curry thin sauce with rice and rolling to a rice ball in your hand and eat.

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backwards

There's one ingredient missing. It's honey, I usually use honey when I cook curry, and it makes the meal delicious.

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abcdefg

Thanks for your comment @backwards -- and welcome to the forum. 

 

 You are right in saying that  lots of recipes call for it. I think the issue of whether or not to add honey depends mainly on how much sweetness is contained in the curry sauce or curry powder you are using, as well as how sweet some of the other ingredients are. 

 

Excerpt from my recipe, above:

 

Quote

 Ready now to cook the chicken, which has been marinating in the fridge. Hot wok, cold oil 热锅冷油 (old Chinese kitchen saying.) Stir fry 翻炒 it over high heat until you no longer see surface pink. The illustration below left shows that it still needs more time. Be careful, however, not to dry it out. Add the coconut milk. Curry recipes often call for adding sugar or even honey, but since this coconut milk is sweet, as are the apples, I didn't use any. 

 

If you prefer your curry to have a more sweet taste, it's certainly fine to add some honey near the end. Curry is one of those flexible dishes that can easily be adapted to suit your personal taste preferences. 

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