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markhavemann
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On 3/8/2022 at 1:27 AM, MTH123 said:

That was my first post on this website, so the formatting is messed up. Sorry! I can't figure out how to edit it.

Welcome to the forums! Editing posts is limited for new members, but I think you should be able to now.

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  • 2 weeks later...

subs2srs is a Windows application, but it can be run on a Mac for free. I have an M1 Mac. If you have an older Mac, you have many more options than I do. I have to wait for software developers to catch up with the newer technology in M1 Macs to have as many options.

 

For older Macs, I suggest doing a YouTube or internet search. I recommend using the free open-source Wine software. It doesn’t require Windows to run Windows applications, so you don’t have to pay for Windows. Wine also has many variations which may be easier to set up, like WineBottler, PlayOnMac or WineSkin. Hint: subs2srs requires the .NET Framework 3.5 portion of Windows to run. I don’t know about the others, but WineSkin has a built-in option to use something called WineTricks to install it.

 

Back to M1 Macs, for the intrepid and I mean the intrepid (aka people who have some inner geek or outer geek to them), read the instructions on the UTM website for installing Windows 11 on an M1 Mac: https://mac.getutm.app/gallery/windows-11-arm. You might also want to do a YouTube search on “Windows 11 Mac UTM,” which will provide part of the instructions in a visual way.

 

The versions of Windows 11 that run on an M1 Mac are unofficial and free. I paid $10 for UTM (through the Mac App Store), but you may be able to find it for free. It is a little easier to use than the free version, if you’re trying to rationalize spending $10.

 

Hint: After you install Windows 11, do a Windows Update. Then, go into Windows Features to select .NET Framework 3.5.

 

On Edit: Hint 2: In UTM, set up a shared directory/folder between the Mac and emulated Windows in UTM. But do this only after Windows 11 is installed. Don't "play around" with options in UTM. Do only what is stated in the instructions. Otherwise, UTM may not be able to install Windows. Afterwards, still don't "play around" with options in UTM. Only set up a shared directory/folder. Otherwise, you may have to start all over. (Keep in mind that software developers are trying to catch up with the newer technology in M1 Macs, so it may be a while before you are able to freely play around with various options.)

 

If you try this, good luck!

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Alternatively, pick up a cheap oldish second hand Windows laptop. You would also then be able to run the workaudiobook app.

 

It’s not necessary to have a fast PC laptop for this sort of function.

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On 3/22/2022 at 9:59 PM, Flickserve said:

Alternatively, pick up a cheap oldish second hand Windows laptop. You would also then be able to run the workaudiobook app.

 

It’s not necessary to have a fast PC laptop for this sort of function.

Great point. I actually have a 2015 Windows 7 laptop (courtesy of an old job) that I haven't used for years. subs2srs does run well on it. I just have to make space for it on my desk and get used to working on tandem computers again. It isn’t that big a deal. I’ve just always preferred doing as much as possible on a Mac.

 

I’ve bought VMWare Fusion in the past to emulate Windows. It was a one-time not-to-hefty cost, maybe around $50. (I got a copy of Windows at no cost to me through work.) I don’t like the current annual-subscription pricing model of CrossOver ($60/year) and Parallels Desktop ($100/year). I’d rather put that kind of money into an old Windows PC, like you suggested, and not have to worry about how many years I have to pay CrossOver or Parallels, before I can’t run anything anymore.

 

workaudiobook? It's another thing I'll have to put on my list to look into. Thanks! I’m still looking forward to my first real use of subs2srs and then figuring out what to do next.

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Hello all,

I discovered this thread just now today.

And I am writing the following without reading every single comment except the very first one.

 

I understand that the person who started this thread started putting together transcripts for Chinese TV shows.

 

 

And I wanted to talk about my solution to this problem.

Auphonic allows me to take any audio file and automatically generate transcripts.

You get 2 hours for free to try out. 

Here is the pricing.

I quickly reached the conclusion that it was in my best interest to pay for using Auphonic

since my learning became very efficient and more fun by incorporating Auphonic into the routine.

The accuracy of the transcript generated this way is pretty good.

Then, I import the text into Chinese Text Analyser and identify words that I want to learn.

Afterwards, I take sentences that contain those words and import them into Anki.

 

EDIT: I have previously mentioned the tool Auphonic a few times on the forum already so I understand how some people might be suspicious. But, I assure you that I am not affiliated with Auphonic. 

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On 3/25/2022 at 12:49 AM, pon00050 said:

I quickly reached the conclusion that it was in my best interest to pay for using Auphonic

since my learning became very efficient and more fun by incorporating Auphonic into the routine.

I wonder if you would be willing to share the transcripts and materials that you've already generated?

Maybe the money you've already spent will be able to go even further and help someone else on their Chinese learning journey too.

 

If you are feel free to get into contact with me, I can put them into the same Google Drive with the rest of the stuff, or if you prefer to share in some other way I can put a link in the main post of this thread.

 

 

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华灯初上 (aka Light The Night) - Season 1 (8 Episodes - Subs and Text Transcripts)

 

Added subs for season 1. I'll add season 2 and 3 soon. 

 

This is a great show, definitely worth watching

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On 3/26/2022 at 11:07 PM, markhavemann said:

I wonder if you would be willing to share the transcripts and materials that you've already generated?

Maybe the money you've already spent will be able to go even further and help someone else on their Chinese learning journey too.

 

If you are feel free to get into contact with me, I can put them into the same Google Drive with the rest of the stuff, or if you prefer to share in some other way I can put a link in the main post of this thread.

 

I sent you a message attaching srt files that I generated using Auphonic.

As I have written in the message, I think it will be more useful for people to learn how I applied Auphonic and source learning materials themselves. So I am going to try to elaborate on the process and share all the components that make this process possible.

 

If you can apply what I describe, the internet is at your immediate disposal ready to be your own Netflix for language learning.

The output looks something like this. This line comes from the 0:51 of this video.

601748214_Ankiscreenshot.thumb.PNG.6fb0f49f85734f162f36aefe10e30098.PNG

 

Prior to uploading the mp3 file that you are interested in making the transcript of,

you need to set up a speech recognition service to be integrated with Auphonic.

The section titled Integrated Speech Services: Wit.ai and Google Cloud Speech API

in this blog post outlines the steps.

 

Then, find an audio that you want to use.

Personally, I use a video on YouTube that feels interesting to me

and use this website that allows me to convert and download the mp3 version.

 

Create a new production on Auphonic, meaning that you upload the mp3 file.

Once the production is complete, the Auphonic yields 5 output files.

I am only interested in the mp3 file and the srt file.

 

And for some of you, this may everything that you want to do because that's enough for getting the matching pair of audio and transcripts. Following is what I do extra to turn the material into more learning friendly format.

 

Python script that I attached to this reply cuts the mp3 file into smaller audio files

using the time stamps in the srt file for each line. As a return, you get matching audio and transcript line by line.

Also, the Python script creates a csv file listing all the time stamps along with the matching lines in the next column.

 

I import the text into Chinese Text Analyser and identify the words that I want to learn.

Finally, the lua script is utilized to make a file that is ready to be imported into Anki.

This file contains the vocabulary and the example sentence from the text.

Once these are imported into Anki, I manually and individually add the matching audio file for each card.

 

 

If you managed to understand what I am doing,

you are not creating Anki cards for all the lines.

You are selectively identifying only those sentences that you need to learn/remember using Anki.

 

Attached are the files that I generated for 

this video from YouTube channel titled 小Lin说

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aJ957mEAFis

 

 

20分钟详解 - 俄罗斯经济到底是怎么回事儿?.srt 20分钟详解 - 俄罗斯经济到底是怎么回事儿?.csv anki-export.lua

subs.py

 

 

 

I have a request if any one of you is capable of doing what I am asking for.

Once the transcript/srt file is generated using Auphonic, it adds extra spaces in the lines.

Currently, I take care of this by just using the simple function of replacing space with ""(nothing) on Excel.

There probably is a simple, quick fix for this that can be done in the Python script. If anyone can modify the transcript

so that it eliminates the spaces prior to generating the csv file, I'd appreciate it.

 

Similarly, when the lua script generates Anki cards, it sometimes adds <p> at the end of definitions.

I believe this was done to format the cards so they look proper/as intended.

At the moment, I wish that I don't need to perform the extra step of removing <p>.

I'd also appreciate it if someone can take a look at the lua script and delete that part in the script.

 

I don't believe that neither of these requires such advanced skill in coding.

 

 

 

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On 3/26/2022 at 11:48 PM, markhavemann said:

华灯初上 (aka Light The Night) - Season 1 (8 Episodes - Subs and Text Transcripts)

 

Added subs for season 1. I'll add season 2 and 3 soon. 

 

This is a great show, definitely worth watching

 

After taking a quick look at all the replies,

I wanted to ask you the following.

 

Have you been mostly financing the scripts by yourself? Paying that store on Taobay and having them type up transcripts?

 

How are you achieving this work of getting transcripts currently?

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@pon00050

 

How accurate is the speech recognition for Mandarin?

 

Do you have a preference for one of the three choices?

 

I use subs2srs for processing the srt and MP3 into individual sentence audio. It puts the times and the mp3 file name on one line in a tsr file. You will get a nice table which can be copied and pasted into google sheets. In google sheets, you can then delete the sentences that you don’t want. The final table can be copied and pasted back into the tsr file which you can then import into anki.

 

I believe this method will have two advantages:

 

1. not add spaces nor add <p> to the sentences.

2. You won’t have to add each audio file to the card manually - its already automatically done for you.

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On 3/27/2022 at 10:56 PM, Flickserve said:

How accurate is the speech recognition for Mandarin?

 

Very high. High enough to be usable.

If a learner is already at a point in which they need to be learning from authentic content originally made for native speakers as much as possible, I think the learner should have no problem with less than perfect transcript that's generated using my way.

 

I have uploaded the srt file. And I also identified and shared the video that provides the matching audio.

Please check the accuracy and make the evaluation yourself.

 

On 3/27/2022 at 10:56 PM, Flickserve said:

Do you have a preference for one of the three choices?

If you are referring to the speech services, I have used only wit.ai and I am thoroughly satisfied with it.

 

On 3/27/2022 at 10:56 PM, Flickserve said:

In google sheets, you can then delete the sentences that you don’t want.

My way does not create cards for all the sentences in the text/transcription.

There aren't any sentences to be deleted.

 

For example, after going through the process that I have described, the transcript contains 150 lines.

Chinese Text Analyzer allows me to quickly identify only those vocabs that I want to learn.

Let's say that there are 20 vocabs to learn from me.

These would be the ones that I have looked up the definitions of in Chinese Text Analyzer.

Then, after running the lua script, 20 cards are automatically created in an instant.

 

In regards to the couple of issues that I identified,

those are only minor issues. Removing and replacing the blanks only takes a second or two, once the file is opened using Excel.

Removing <p> also requires a simple task of removing it while I am adding tags to each card, which I am already doing.

On 3/27/2022 at 10:56 PM, Flickserve said:

2. You won’t have to add each audio file to the card manually - its already automatically done for you.

At the moment, I am not convinced enough to change my workflow in order for getting this benefit that seems like a small win for me.

 

For my purpose, in my eyes, the workflow is perfect. 

 

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

My Subtitle-Translation Project

 

Courtesy of one of the many great concepts in this thread, the first significant upgrade to my personal subtitle-translation project has been to add the use of the free subs2srs software to make Anki cards. I’ve finished translating an episode, and I just put it through subs2srs. It’s Episode 1 of Put Your Head on My Shoulder. Put Your Head on My Shoulder is the #4 most popular Chinese TV drama to English speaking people on MyDramaList.com. The resulting files are:

 

·       English subtitle file (Put Your Head on My Shoulder E01 English Rev 0.srt)

·       Simplified Chinese subtitle file (Put Your Head on My Shoulder E01 Chinese Simplified Rev 0.srt)

·       Traditional Chinese subtitle file (Put Your Head on My Shoulder E01 Chinese Traditional Rev 0.srt)

·       Pinyin subtitle file (Put Your Head on My Shoulder E01 Chinese Pinyin Rev 0.srt)

·       Transcript file for each of the above (*.TXT files)

·       Anki import file (PYHOMS_E01_All.tsv)

·       Anki media files (*.MP3 and *.JPG files) in a subfolder

·       Anki deck template file (subs2srs_template_for_anki2_all.apkg)

 

Also, I put a transcript file through the (not-free) Chinese Text Analyser software. I exported the following text file:

 

·       Put Your Head on My Shoulder E01 Chinese Text Analyser.txt

 

The files are at the link below.

 

https://mega.nz/folder/VjZHhZTS#qcfg0S9MJpjeEgpNcZV0Wg

 

This post has two purposes. One is to describe what I did. But I only provide highlights of my process. Otherwise, this post would be way, way, way too long. As it is, it’s just too long, lol. If anyone is interested, I can write detailed posts about specific things. Creating my own English subtitles has been an interesting learning exercise in-and-of itself.

 

The other purpose of this post is to add information that you can use to help decide if you want to try this yourself and how. Specifically, I discuss big companies that show Chinese TV dramas, so you can form an opinion about how you would use their English subtitles. The big companies I discuss are Viki, Netflix, iQiyi, WeTV/Tencent and MGTV/MangoTV.

 

If you download the video(s) for Put Your Head on My Shoulder, then a question is whether the timing matches my subtitles. (Where to download video files from is a separate topic, which I posted about earlier in this thread.) Setting aside subtitles for a moment, most of the time, the video files between different big companies are the same or very close to it. But sometimes, they’re different because of shorter introductions, cut lines, cut scenes, previews, recaps, commercial breaks, etc. Sometimes only a few episodes are different. You may not know for sure if all of your videos files and subtitle files match until you go through all of them.

 

For Episode 1 of Put Your Head on My Shoulder, the timing probably matches. But, if the video is originally from Netflix, then the timing of all the subtitles needs to be shifted earlier ~1.8 sec. This can be done in the free Subtitle Edit software (or the free Aegisub software).

 

Creating My Own Translations – Excel Spreadsheet

 

I do the bulk of my translation work in an Excel spreadsheet. I start with multiple Chinese subtitle files from one or more of the big companies that show Chinese TV dramas, because I like to be thorough. (How to download subtitle files is a separate topic, which I posted about earlier in this thread.) For Put Your Head on My Shoulder, I have Simplified Chinese subtitle files from Netflix and WeTV. I also have Traditional Chinese subtitle files from Viki, Netflix and WeTV. So I have five sets of Chinese subtitles. It looks like all five sets were created/edited by different people.

 

They are all very good. In fact, they should be very good because they are transcriptions, not translations. (Viki is the only one that consistently includes lyrics, but it rarely has Chinese subtitles. Put Your Head on My Shoulder happens to be a rare exception.)

 

An idealized goal is to have one sentence in one subtitle. However, it’s only an idealized goal. Frequently, a subtitle will be half a sentence or two sentences or another variation, because of good timing guidelines. I’ll discuss good timing later. Viki is the only big company that has this idealized goal. All the others chop up sentences more and sometimes much more. So I frequently combine two or more Chinese subtitles into one subtitle, but only if the total duration is less than 7 seconds.

 

I copy-and-paste a Chinese subtitle into the free, online MDBG Chinese Dictionary (or another source, like the free version of Pleco Chinese Dictionary, which is a smart-phone app). 99% of the English words in my translations is based on dictionaries. I think this is better for learning Chinese, before branching off into synonyms, etc.

 

Specifically, I’ve been using the Words tab in MDBG, which allows a whole Chinese sentence to be copied-and-pasted into it. It puts the Chinese characters in a list and puts the English translation options next to them. This is not to be confused with the Translate tab in MDBG, which is similar to Google Translate, where all the English words and ordering of them are pre-determined for you and are often inaccurate.

 

The Words tab in MDBG allows me to pick and choose from English translations of individual Chinese characters and character combinations. An important feature is that MDBG recognizes character combinations, including idioms. Once I’ve decided how I want to translation a whole Chinese sentence into a whole English sentence, I type the English sentence into the Excel spreadsheet.

 

Sometimes, I use Google Translate to help me decide what order to put English words in, although I often don’t use the exact same ordering. Google Translate has been getting better through the years, but it’s still far from a finished product. So I use it with caution.

 

Let me take a side trip to give you an example of one of the weirder translations by WeTV, Netflix and Viki in the episode that I just translated. A supporting character had just said, “I've decided to have a graduation certificate in one hand and a marriage certificate in the other hand. I have a goal.” Then, she said 我的游戏情缘 即将轰轰烈烈地开始.

 

·       WeTV’s translation is “My life of game is going to start soon.” It kind of looks like gibberish from an automatic Google-Translate-type of translation. I’ve heard that there are Chinese TV companies that start with automatic translations and manually clean them up later, like MangoTV. It looks like WeTV does that too. I don’t know if iQiyi does that too.

·       Netflix’s translation is “My love of games is going to start soon.” At least it looks like English. By the way, I was disappointed to see that Netflix had only edited WeTV’s subtitles and didn’t create their own. When Netflix creates their own, they’re much better.

·       Viki’s translation is “My gaming relationship is about to start passionately.” It’s much better, but it still misses the intent of what the character was saying.

·       My translation is “My game of predestined love is about to begin vigorously.”

 

Timing – Subtitle Edit Software

 

There’s more to good English subtitles than good translations. Good timing is the other major factor in creating good English subtitles. Good timing 1) allows English subtitles to be read comfortably and 2) allows accurate translations to be kept, instead of making them concise, loose or “creative.” It’s a myth that English subtitles need to be made concise to be read comfortably.

 

Viki is the only big company that keeps accurate translations. However, Viki uses a lot of synonyms or whatever else a given translator prefers. While Viki is much better than all of the other big companies, it isn’t as good as creating your own English subtitles for learning Chinese.

 

All the big companies, except Viki and Netflix, start a subtitle when spoken Chinese starts, and end the subtitle when the spoken Chinese ends. Viki and Netflix have schemes for extending timing. This is what allows Viki to keep accurate translations. Netflix still chooses to make subtitles concise.

 

The key to good timing is a metric called characters per second (CPS). I’ll write a separate post on my timing guidelines, if anyone wants me to. Essentially, I took the best guidelines of Viki, Netflix, Captiz, etc. and put together my own set of guidelines to reduce CPS as much as possible, while always keeping accurate translations. The result is that less than 5% of my subtitles exceeds a CPS of 20, which is good (per Captiz).

 

I go through a simple process to get my English translations from the Excel spreadsheet into the free Subtitle Edit software (https://www.nikse.dk/subtitleedit). (I can’t recommend this software highly enough. I’m absolutely astounded at how much better it is than other “best” free subtitle software.) I also open the video file in Subtitle Edit. Subtitle Edit shows the audio waveform, which is used to help select timing. I go through the subtitles one by one to select timing. Start times are just before audio starts (within 0.02 second or so). End times are based on my scheme to extend end times.

 

Final Subtitle Files

 

I copy the English subtitle file back into the Excel spreadsheet. I line up the Chinese subtitles with the English subtitles, because subtitles usually move around quite a bit, while I’m working in Subtitle Edit. I use simple formulas to replace the timing in the Chinese subtitles with the timing in the English subtitles. It’s better for subs2srs, if the timing in the Chinese and English subtitle files match exactly.

 

I convert either the Simplified Chinese subtitle file or Traditional Chinese subtitle file into a Pinyin subtitle file using the website below.

 

https://www.purpleculture.net/chinese-pinyin-converter/

 

I use simple manipulations in Excel to delete the rows with Simplified/Traditional Chinese, because I only want Pinyin in the subtitle file.

 

Transcript Files

 

I do some simple processing in Excel to make a transcript file (text file) for each of the Simplified Chinese, Traditional Chinese, Pinyin and English.

 

subs2srs and Libre Office

 

If you’re unfamiliar with subs2srs, download it from the link below.

 

https://sourceforge.net/projects/subs2srs/

 

Then, go to the link below for instructions about subs2srs and Anki. Yes, Anki too.

 

http://subs2srs.sourceforge.net/

 

In subs2srs, I use the default settings, except for the ones below.

 

·       Advanced Subtitle Options, each of the Subs1 tab and Subs2 tab: Uncheck “Join lines that end with one of the following characters.” I’ve already optimized the subtitles for learning Chinese, so I don’t want this option.

·       Generate Audio Clips, Pad Timings: Start 100 ms. End 0 ms. I don’t need padding, but I added 100 ms to start times for the heck of it. Then, the audio clips start 100 ms sooner.

·       The default snapshot is 240x160 (4:3). The aspect ratio needs to be changed to match the video. The video is 16:9. (Most Chinese TV dramas are 16:9. It’s a whole separate topic to figure out the aspect ratio of a drama that isn’t 16:9.) So the snapshot needs to be 240x136.

 

I select the Simplified Chinese subtitle file, English subtitle file, and video file. It takes roughly half an hour on my computer for subs2srs to generate Anki cards for a 45-minute episode.

 

Optional

 

subs2srs creates a *.TSV file that includes one set of Chinese subtitles (e.g., Simplified Chinese) and a set of English subtitles. I also want the other two sets of Chinese (e.g., Traditional Chinese and Pinyin). So I open the *.TSV file in a spreadsheet in the free Libre Office using UTF-8 encoding and tab separators. I copy the other two sets of Chinese from the transcript files (not the subtitle files) into two new columns in the spreadsheet. I save the file with a new name and with UTF-8 encoding. (UTF-8 encoding is the reason why I use Libre Office instead of Excel, per the Anki User Manual.)

 

The result is the file PYHOMS_E01_All.tsv that I included. I put this file in the same folder as the original *.TSV file.

 

In the website below, where the instructions for Anki say to use the file subs2srs_template_for_anki2.apkg, use the file subs2srs_template_for_anki2_all.apkg that I included instead. It’s set up to include all three of Simplified Chinese, Traditional Chinese and Pinyin on the same Anki cards.

 

http://subs2srs.sourceforge.net/

 

Chinese Text Analyser

 

I open the Simplified Chinese subtitle file (Put Your Head on My Shoulder E01 Chinese Simplified Rev 0.srt) in the (not-free) Chinese Text Analyser software (https://www.chinesetextanalyser.com/). (Open, not Import. Yeah, I didn’t start reading the user manual, until after I started playing around with it and nothing seemed to happen, lol.)

 

I export all of the rows in descending order of frequency to a text file (Put Your Head on My Shoulder E01 Chinese Text Analyser.txt). I include the information below.

 

·       Simplified Chinese

·       Traditional Chinese

·       Pinyin (Tones)

·       Frequency

·       % Frequency

·       Cumulative Frequency

·       First Occurrence

·       HSK Level

·       TOCFL Level

·       Sentence

·       Cloze Sentence

·       English Definition

 

Other Options

 

If I didn’t create my own English subtitles, I would consider the options listed below, in order of preference.

 

·       I would sift through a whole bunch of Chinese TV dramas on Viki, until I found one that has English and Chinese subtitles. In fact, Put Your Head on My Shoulder is one of them. Again, Viki is the only big company that creates accurate English subtitles. They’re much more accurate than all of the other big companies.

·       Next, I would go for English subtitles from Viki and Chinese subtitles from whoever has them (usually not Viki). The timing won’t match, so I would have to line them up in an Excel spreadsheet. This is some extra work. I think it’s worth it.

·       If I didn’t want to line up anything in an Excel spreadsheet, I would go for English and Chinese subtitles from Netflix, because they are better than all of the Chinese TV companies.

·       If I didn’t have a paid Netflix subscription, I would go for English and Chinese subtitles from iQiyi, which is the best of the Chinese TV companies. I don’t know if iQiyi subtitles always work out. I probably wouldn’t go passed this option.

·       If I were to take a chance on English and Chinese subtitles from WeTV/Tencent, I would brace myself to be disappointed. Even for a blockbuster like You Are My Glory, the translator translated “creatively,” sentences were sometimes chopped to bits, starts times would sometimes be after spoken Chinese started, etc. The subtitles only work okay, if you’re casually watching the drama and don’t care or are already pre-conditioned to ignore stuff that is going by too fast. Having said that, I’m pretty sure I’ve seen WeTV subtitles that aren’t like this. But, I’ve learned not to assume that WeTV subtitles are “normal.”

·       I would avoid English subtitles from MGTV/MangoTV, especially if the drama isn’t popular. Automatically translated English subtitles may never be cleaned up for some-to-all of the episodes. Sometimes, even if they are cleaned up, they aren’t cleaned up very well at all.

·       I would avoid English subtitles from others on YouTube for the same reason above. (Chinese subtitle files from YouTube should be very good, but they are rarely available.)

 

Happy Chinese Learning!

 

Please feel free to suggest improvements of any kind from a better translation of a subtitle to a better process! I’m especially new to subs2srs, Anki and Chinese Text Analyser, so any suggestions about them would be especially helpful to me. Happy Chinese Learning!

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I went ahead and looked for Chinese TV dramas that have a complete set of Chinese subtitles by Viki--as well as English subtitles by Viki, of course. I thought it might be easier for me to do this than someone new to this, since I already keep a long list of “recent” popular Chinese TV dramas and since I’m used to downloading subtitles. Even with this head start, it took me hours to put this list together. The dramas are ranked by a combination of popularity and ratings on MyDramaList.com and Viki.

 

Chinese TV Drama

Simplified

Traditional

Year

Country

Comment

Go Go Squid!

yes

yes

2019

China

Modern

Go Ahead

yes

---

2020

China

Modern

The Untamed

yes

---

2019

China

Historical

Put Your Head on My Shoulder

---

yes

2019

China

Modern

Lucky's First Love*

yes

---

2019

China

Modern

Skate Into Love

yes

---

2020

China

Modern

Lost Romance

yes

yes

2020

Taiwan

Modern

Arsenal Military Academy

yes

---

2019

China

Republican Era

First Romance

yes

---

2020

China

Modern

The Love Equations

yes

---

2020

China

Modern

General's Lady

yes

---

2020

China

Historical

Love Unexpected

yes

---

2021

China

Modern

All I Want for Love is You

yes

---

2019

China

Modern

Behind Your Smile

---

yes

2016

Taiwan

Modern

Legend of Fei

yes

---

2020

China

Historical

Someday or One Day

yes

---

2019

Taiwan

Modern

The Perfect Match

---

yes

2017

Taiwan

Modern

Falling Into You

yes

yes

2020

Taiwan

Modern

Sm:)e

yes

---

2018

China

Modern

GO Into Your Heart

yes

---

2021

China

Modern

The Flaming Heart

yes

---

2021

China

Modern

The Wonder Woman

---

yes

2020

Taiwan

Modern

* Lucky’s First Love is also known as The World Owes Me A First Love.

 

The list above is 11% of my full list of “recent” popular dramas on Viki. (Actually, it also includes some not-so-popular dramas.) So, it isn’t as much digging around for a drama on Viki as I thought it would be. I don’t know if this percentage holds for less “recent” or less popular dramas though. My impression is that it doesn’t. There are more volunteer subtitlers these days, and they tend to go for the more popular dramas. It’s definitely more fun to translate a drama that you like a lot.

 

(This is my first time copy-and-pasting a table from Word. I’m still learning how to format posts in this forum. It was a pleasant surprise that I could copy-and-paste some formatted stuff from Word.)

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