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Tomsima

Random Character of the Day

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Tomsima

Couldn't find a thread like this that had been started already. I quite enjoy it when I come across a more unusual character, be it in appearance or in usage. All entries welcome, please share the context you found the character appear in. 

 

Spoiler

 

(lín) appears in 遴选 v. 〈wr.〉 select (sb. for a position).

Appeared in "...从通过质量和疗效一致性评价的仿制药对应的通用名药品中遴选试点品种,国家组织药品集中采购和使用试点。"

 

 

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mungouk

Not sure if this qualifies, but it's been cropping up in Singapore for a while and I only recently worked out what it was.

 

1414831586_Screenshot2019-01-18at01_13_26.thumb.png.7acf215cd4c0655f8569fc303636d882.png

 

"Huat ah!"(發呵?) is a traditional greeting in Singapore and Malaysia, apparently coming from Southern Min as an exclamation to wish oneself or others luck.  I've heard it at CNY and other festivals in SG.

 

It took me a while to realise that 發 is the trad version of 发... not that it really helps with translation. 

 

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Tomsima


 

Spoiler

 

(xī) same as 桂花, appears in 木樨 (桂花) 

 

appeared in "...這原因就在於80年代已經開展了一場討論被攔腰斬斷在天安門的木樨地..."

 

木樨地 is a place name

 

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Tomsima

 

Spoiler

 

(shǎng), 'noon' in 晌午, 'short period of time' in 半晌

 

appeared in “過了半晌,她忽然又道:我認得那姓方的女人"

 

 

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roddy

 

Spoiler

xiǎn, only a surname as far as I can see.

 

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Tomsima

really interesting, learnt about 冼星海, also noticed  was written by mao, perhaps in reference to 冼恒汉? cant find where the character is taken from exactly

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Tomsima

Spoiler

 

wù, as seen in the place name 婺源

this character cropped up in a book about tea

 

 

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Tomsima

Spoiler

nuó 'exorcise', as in 儺戲, the exorcism dances of 安徽

 

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Shelley

I have checked and double checked and I can't find wù 婺 that means widow on its own without shuāng 孀.

On its own it means beautiful.

Now it is quite possible my dictionary or my knowledge or both have let me down but it leaves me some what confused.

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Shelley

According to Pleco it is wù or móu , mù all meaning beautiful. Perhaps its a usage thing? I don't know.

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