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Pooja

Help with translation URGENT!!

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Pooja

On my recent visit to China I bought this box thinking it's some chocolate. 

But now on close inspection I have a feeling it's dog/cat food. Can someone please confirm if it's for animals or people?

IMG_20191022_163910.jpg

IMG_20191022_163914.jpg

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889

I assume this would be URGENT!! only if you've just eaten one, arf arf.

 

Anyway, while human packaged food doesn't normally contain a notation that it's for humans, all of the labellings on this package are consistent with food for humans, not animals. (To be honest, would you really give a dog or cat these chocolate-filled biscuits?)

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Pooja

Well I thought the same how chocolate snack would be made for animals, but in the receipt it mentioned "dog food" while using Google translate and that's when I panicked and had to get it confirmed before offering anyone at home! 

 

Thanks a lot for the quick reply! :)

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roddy

The Single-Dog branding could cause the confusion. But if you don't want them, I'll have them. 

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abcdefg

They are for human consumption. In East Asia you will often see a "cute kitty" or a "cute puppy" as a mascot or advertising gimmick to promote consumer products. It's especially true if the product is aimed at a younger market, teens and young adults. "Hello Kitty" is the most well known example. One sees that one here on clothes.

 

Don't worry about eating these or sharing them with your friends. They should be fine.

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imron
5 minutes ago, roddy said:

But if you don't want them, I'll have them. 

Not me.  I know better than to trust Chinese chocolate goods - they invariably taste awful, which is probably why OP thought they were dog food.

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roddy

Unimportant and in passing, but the Audrey Hepburn Cat (Pawdrey Hepburn?) was a UK invention. Yet one more thing for us to apologise for. 

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889

Have these with your Breakfast at Tiffany's?

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ZhangKaiRong
25 minutes ago, imron said:

Not me.  I know better than to trust Chinese chocolate goods - they invariably taste awful, which is probably why OP thought they were dog food.

Fully agree. The only edible chocolate I found at a normal supermarket was the Dove ones.

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Pooja
33 minutes ago, roddy said:

The Single-Dog branding could cause the confusion. But if you don't want them, I'll have them

 

Exactly what got me confused along with the receipt of "single-dog food". 

 

Haha would've definitely shared one in person to whoever helped me with the translation 😅 

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889

To be fair, these are clearly labelled as containing cocoa-butter substitute, not real cocoa butter. So in the US they could not be sold as "chocolate" biscuits. They'd be sold as "chocolatey" or "chocolate-flavored" or some such biscuits. Have to say, on the whole Chinese confectionary and biscuits are pretty careful about noting somewhere on the box whether chocolate-looking stuff is real or not. But you do have to read carefully. 代可可脂 are the magic words usually used on chocolatey stuff.

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Pooja
34 minutes ago, abcdefg said:

They are for human consumption. In East Asia you will often see a "cute kitty" or a "cute puppy" as a mascot or advertising gimmick to promote consumer products. It's especially true if the product is aimed at a younger market, teens and young adults. "Hello Kitty" is the most well known example. One sees that one here on clothes.

 

Don't worry about eating these or sharing them with your friends. They should be fine.

 

Yes I noticed a lot of food snacks and chocolates branded in a way to attract kids attention and of all the things on the shelf this box seemed edible at the time and took the cat pic as just a cute branding. 

 

The panic started when I saw the bill and just had to get my doubt cleared before consuming 😅

 

Thanks for the response! :)

34 minutes ago, imron said:

Not me.  I know better than to trust Chinese chocolate goods - they invariably taste awful, which is probably why OP thought they were dog food.

 

Agreed. The other chocolates and toffees I purchased weren't good, only dove chocolate and some chocolate crisps were the decent ones! 

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Pooja
9 minutes ago, ZhangKaiRong said:

Fully agree. The only edible chocolate I found at a normal supermarket was the Dove ones.

 

Exactly! Dove was the only good chocolate I got of all the sweet purchases :(

5 minutes ago, 889 said:

To be fair, these are clearly labelled as containing cocoa-butter substitute, not real cocoa butter. So in the US they could not be sold as "chocolate" biscuits. They'd be sold as "chocolatey" or "chocolate-flavored" or some such biscuits. Have to say, on the whole Chinese confectionary and biscuits are pretty careful about noting somewhere on the box whether chocolate-looking stuff is real or not. But you do have to read carefully.

 

Agree. On using Google translate it wasn't mentioned straight forward as being chocolate biscuits which just added to my confusion. 

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ibag

Cocoa butter substitutes is not a healthy food, don't suggest to eat them, but this one is definitely for people to eat, not for pet.
The cat and dog above refers to single women and men, it's a feature for the food brand.
And the Pets Rock is a registered trademark. 

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Dawei3
On 10/22/2019 at 7:16 AM, Pooja said:

But now on close inspection I have a feeling it's dog/cat food.

Thanks for your fun question.  I don't have anything to add to the above other than I was glad you asked the question & enjoyed reading the responses.  We welcome your future questions 😊  

 

 

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889

Enjoying your Dove Bar there in China? Good. Let's see what you're eating.

 

Here, courtesy of JD.com, are the ingredients of the Dove Dark Chocolate Bar sold in China:

 

image.thumb.jpeg.01ce69ce30d3accc529402f14773e613.jpeg

 

And here, courtesy of Amazon, are the ingredients of the Dove Dark Chocolate Bar sold in the US:

 

image.thumb.jpeg.7a5e4ce5cc67eaf8fffeacc51b02d2b8.jpeg

 

That is, your Chinese Dove Bar has got 植物油 in it. Your American one doesn't.

 

Now there is a promise on the Chinese Dove Bar that the cocoa butter content won't be less than 20 percent. So far as I know, the cocoa butter proportion of the American bar isn't published, but here's what Mars -- the maker of the Dove Bar -- has said:

 

"Cocoa butter typically makes up 30 percent to 50 percent of a chocolate bar, depending on the variety of the bar, Mars said."

 

http://www.reuters.com/article/us-mars-chocolate-cocoa/update-1-mars-us-pledges-to-use-only-100-pct-cocoa-butter-idUSN1733995620070917

 

So based on what Mars itself has said, 20 percent cocoa butter is about one-third to more than one-half less than you'd expect in a real chocolate bar. The rest is just some vegetable fat. Yuk.

 

"Even before he had taken it he knew by the smell that it was very unusual chocolate. It was dark and shiny, and was wrapped in silver paper. Chocolate normally was dull brown crumbly stuff that tasted, as nearly as one could describe it, like the smoke of a rubbish fire. But at some time or another he had tasted chocolate like the piece she had given him."

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