Jump to content
Chinese-forums.com
Learn Chinese in China

Tomsima

Honorifics in Chinese

Recommended Posts

Site Sponsors:
Pleco for iPhone / Android iPhone & Android Chinese dictionary: camera & hand- writing input, flashcards, audio.
Study Chinese in Kunming 1-1 classes, qualified teachers and unique teaching methods in the Spring City.
Learn Chinese Characters Learn 2289 Chinese Characters in 90 Days with a Unique Flash Card System.
Hacking Chinese Tips and strategies for how to learn Chinese more efficiently
Popup Chinese Translator Understand Chinese inside any Windows application, website or PDF.
Chinese Grammar Wiki All Chinese grammar, organised by level, all in one place.

zhouhaochen

What a great article. I am going to use some of these and see what happens!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
889

But the title "Honorifics" is misleading; it's really about Chinese hierarchical terms. That is, in spite of what the Wiki says, I don't think "self-deprecation" for example is an honorific. Perhaps in linguistics I don't know but certainly not in everyday terms.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tomsima

self-deprecation = putting yourself down to show respect to the person you are speaking to. I would consider bowing or kneeling to be an act of honouring the person who is bowed or knelt to; using language in the same way seems to fit the category of honorific properly to me

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Michaelyus

In linguistic terms, humble language is certainly a part of the language, and was culturally required in Ming and Qing Imperial Mandarin. Anyone who has learnt modern Japanese 謙譲語 kenjougo will know how essential "humble language" is as part of the system of honorifics. Self-deprecation was not and is still not a huge part of jocular self-expression in East Asia, but a huge part of societal requirement, unlike in modern English or in many European languages, although I agree the cultural differences are just points on a continuum.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
889

There's a Wikipedia entry on Honorifics generally which says a self-referring term like your ever-obedient servant can be called an anti-honorific. As a humble unlearned, I would have thought that calling another my ever-obedient servant would be an anti-honorific.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
abcdefg
On 10/28/2019 at 6:07 AM, Tomsima said:

self-deprecation = putting yourself down to show respect to the person you are speaking to.

 

Polite Question: 您贵姓?

Polite Answer: 免贵姓 -- 李,张,周,etc.  or 免贵,姓 -- 李,张,周,etc. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Flickserve

Saying 臣 instead of 我 seems to come up quite often in period dramas when addressing higher ranking officials.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and select your username and password later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Click here to reply. Select text to quote.

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...