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Jan Finster
On 11/30/2019 at 9:30 AM, murrayjames said:

If you frequently refer to dictionaries when reading Chinese, try using a Chinese-Chinese dictionary. Stay in L2. You’ll learn to think about Chinese vocabulary in Chinese, and may pick up—or strengthen your command of—other useful Chinese words in the process.

At what stage of your Chinese language learning did you start with a Chinese-Chinese dictionary? I remember when I learnt English as a second language in high school we were told to use an English-English dictionary at an intermediate stage. Is there a particular ZH-ZH dictionary you recommend?

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imron

I'm a fan of Steve Kaufman and his learning philosophy.  I don't agree with him on everything.

 

Likewise, many members here don't agree with me on everything either, and it wouldn't be much a discussion site if everyone here only agreed with me.

 

For the record, I'm not against the concept and philosophy of Lingq (strongly or otherwise), and in fact here is a post where I even point someone towards using it.

 

I do believe using a popup dictionary for Chinese is detrimental to long-term learning goals unless you are also spending time separately revising the words you've looked up.  Lingq is far more than just a popup dictionary however.

 

I suspect the forum is so comparatively silent about Lingq is because people don't use it, not because of anything the admins believe.

 

49 minutes ago, Jan Finster said:

At what stage of your Chinese language learning did you start with a Chinese-Chinese dictionary?

My second year of learning.

 

50 minutes ago, Jan Finster said:

Is there a particular ZH-ZH dictionary you recommend?

The Guifan C-C dictionary that you can get for Pleco.

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Shelley

Talking about reading and understanding without referring to a dictionary, I have discovered that I come across characters that I know the meaning but can't remember the pronunciation.

I don't look them up at the time of reading becuase it doesn't spoil my comprehension and it won't ruin the flow. I look them up later.

 

What is this about? I can't imagine in English having this situation - understanding a word but not knowing its sound.

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imron
1 hour ago, Shelley said:

I can't imagine in English having this situation - understanding a word but not knowing its sound.

It happens quite a lot now with the ever increasing use of emojis.

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Shelley
54 minutes ago, imron said:

It happens quite a lot now with the ever increasing use of emojis.

 

This is true and I hadn't thought about it quite like that. I knew the original emoji was a "smiley"  never thought about what the others were called.

 

I just wondered how this rates on the scale of you don't really know that character,  somehow it seems better than not knowing it at all, but at the same time worse.

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murrayjames
14 hours ago, Jan Finster said:

At what stage of your Chinese language learning did you start with a Chinese-Chinese dictionary?

 

At the intermediate stage, after a few years of study.

 

14 hours ago, Jan Finster said:

Is there a particular ZH-ZH dictionary you recommend?

 

The C-C dictionaries on Pleco are excellent. Xiandai Hanyu Guifan Cidian is the obvious first choice for contemporary Chinese. Other Pleco C-C- dictionaries (Hanyu Da Cidian, Longman, etc.) are very good for less recent or Chengyu-heavy literature.

 

dict.baidu.com is good for quick searches.

 

For paper dictionaries, buy the inexpensive ubiquitous red one, 现代汉语词典. I keep one in my office and love flipping through its pages.

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imron
1 hour ago, murrayjames said:

For paper dictionaries, buy the inexpensive ubiquitous red one, 现代汉语词典. I keep one in my office and love flipping through its pages.

This is the aforementioned paper dictionary of mine that I am fond of but no longer use :mrgreen: Mine's beige though rather than red.

 

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DeanaZimmerman

On reading the first several rows. If they are OK, I continue doing it.

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