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kroy123

Does a TEFL for work in Shenzhen need to be legalized by a Chinese embassy?

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kroy123

I have a TEFL from a UK company which has been certified by a UK solicitor, but can't go to the Chinese embassy in the UK now as it's closed. According to https://www.tefllemon.com/everything-americans-need-to-know-about-getting-a-work-visa-for-china, in Shenzhen at least a TEFL doesn't need to be legalized by a Chinese embassy:

In the case of Shenzhen, getting the TEFL stamped by the local public notary is sufficient

In addition, I've received 2 teaching offers in Shenzhen and in both cases, in the list of documents they require from you, for the TEFL they say it only needs to be notarized by a notary office, not authenticated/legalized by a Chinese embassy, eg:

Notarize and authenticate documents for teaching certificate (Notarized by any notary office, don’t need to be authenticated by the Chinese Embassy)

One other recruited I spoke with also said "in Shenzhen the TEFL need to be notarized, no need to be authenticated"

However, I am dealing with hagueapostille.co.uk now (an apostille service in the UK) and they are insistent that the TEFL has to be legalized by the Chinese embassy in the UK first for a fee of £135.00, even after I've mentioned the above to them. Can anyone comment on this?

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mungouk

When I got my certificates legalised this year the charge was £47 per document. £135 sounds like someone's making a bit of a killing.

 

As you probably know, apostille services are done by the FCO using their online service, but since China doesn't recognise the convention on apostilles, you would normally also have to get docs legalised via the visa application service centre (the consulate doesn't do this since last year, it's now outsourced to visaforchina.org... but the 4 UK centres are also still closed since 27 March).

 

FWIW I didn't get my CELTA certificate apostilled/legalised when I worked in Beijing last year.  Just a notarised copy of my highest degree cert and the notarised original of my police background check (Disclosure Scotland in my case).

 

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kroy123

I can't get my TEFL legalized by the chinese embassy in the UK being they're all closed, so I'll just have to take my chances and see if the TEFL authorised/notarized/apostilled (whatever the correct terminology is in my case) by a UK solicitor means anything. I am curious that you didn't need a verified TEFL for your work visa as that is always listed as a requirement. Dunno if it being CELTA had anything to do with it.

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ChTTay
On 6/9/2020 at 8:58 PM, kroy123 said:

Shenzhen at least a TEFL doesn't need to be legalized by a Chinese embassy:

In the case of Shenzhen, getting the TEFL stamped by the local public notary is sufficient

In addition, I've received 2 teaching offers in Shenzhen and in both cases, in the list of documents they require from you, for the TEFL they say it only needs to be notarized by a notary office, not authenticated/legalized by a Chinese embassy, eg:

Notarize and authenticate documents for teaching certificate (Notarized by any notary office, don’t need to be authenticated by the Chinese Embassy)

One other recruited I spoke with also said "in Shenzhen the TEFL need to be notarized, no need to be authenticated"

With ALL these people actually in China telling you it doesn’t need to be authenticated and legalised ... I’d probably listen to them. You’d hope they’d have experience with this being on the ground in China. 
 

I agree with Mungouk the fee of 135 seems dodgy. Don’t bother! 

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mungouk
19 hours ago, kroy123 said:

I am curious that you didn't need a verified TEFL for your work visa as that is always listed as a requirement.

 

Well, thinking about it I didn't actually enter the country on a work visa. I entered on an L-visa and converted the residence permit once I was there. But I did do 99% of the leg-work for the Z visa in advance... circumstances meant that I ran out of time to apply for it.

 

19 hours ago, kroy123 said:

notarized/apostilled (whatever the correct terminology is in my case) by a UK solicitor

 

When the solicitor or notary public signs it to certify it's a true copy (or true original) that's notarising

 

The apostille is a fancy sticker that's attached to the notarised copy by the FCO, basically certifying that the solicitor or notary public is who they say they are, and when/where they notarised it.

 

If you then need to use the document in a country that isn't a signatory to the Apostille Convention (like China), you also need to get it "legalised" which is the service that's provided by the consulate or embassy... since last year visaforchina.org processes these on their behalf.

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kroy123
13 hours ago, mungouk said:

Well, thinking about it I didn't actually enter the country on a work visa. I entered on an L-visa and converted the residence permit once I was there. But I did do 99% of the leg-work for the Z visa in advance... circumstances meant that I ran out of time to apply for it.

I am also in China on an L visa looking to convert to a work permit if that's relevant. I'm fast running out of time though. Seems like it'll be a gamble still whether my non-legalised TEFL will be of any use.

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