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cbfunky

Flagged by grammar checker - what's wrong here?

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cbfunky

Hello all,

 

I wrote this sentence 饺子很贵,一龙饺子一百个克朗。 for an assignment for my Chinese class. I ran it through a couple of online grammar checkers and they flagged the following:

一龙 and 一百个. In class the teacher said the measure word for kronor is 个, not 块, the checker might get confused by that. but is the word order and measure word for 饺子 right?

 

Bonus question: Is this the correct wording for "She makes beer at home"?

她做啤酒在家。

 

Thank you!

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889

笼 not 龙 here.

 

她在家酿造啤酒。

 

A quick Google search turns up both 个 and 块 being used with 克朗. I think 块 sounds better but that's not to say it's necessarily "right."

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JulieCD

Hi,

Happy Lunar OX new year!  牛年快乐!

 

Sentence "饺子很贵,一龙饺子一百个克朗",  should be : "饺子很贵,一笼饺子一百克朗“. If you mean you‘d like to buy one 饺子 for 100 kronor, that will be "饺子很贵,一个饺子一百克朗“ . That's too expensive 🙂

 

”龙“ is dragon but   ”一笼“  means one layer of a steam pot.  A steam pot for business has many  layers.  ”笼“ is the same sound as 龙.  The upper  part of character "笼 " is bamboo head called 竹字头and it looks like bamboo leaves( 竹 means bamboo, pronounce "zhu2") . The original steam pot was made of bamboo, that's why "笼 " has a 竹字头。If a character has a 竹字头, usually means it relates to bamboo material.  Lots Chinese characters are pictographs.

 

For Chinese money, "5 Chinese yuan" is either  "5块钱 ” or “5元钱”. 

For kronor, if the amount is less than 10, you can use measure word "个 " 。  But we  usually  use  “number + 克朗” directly for kronor , especial the amount is more than 10 kronor。 "5克朗“ , ”20克朗” , "200克朗 ", "1000克朗“ are correct ways to express the kronor money.

 

她做啤酒在家。-> 她在家做啤酒。

we  put the location before verb word in Chinese。

 

 

 

 

 

 

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abcdefg

她在家里做啤酒。

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anonymoose
4 hours ago, cbfunky said:

In class the teacher said the measure word for kronor is 个, not 块

 

I would have said that 克朗 is a measure word itself: 一百克朗

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Mandarincave

饺子很贵,一笼饺子一百克朗。

 

她在家里酿造啤酒。

 

Thanks.

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cbfunky

Thank you all! I must have accidentially picked the wrong "long" in the IME - that certainly explains why it was flagged.

 

Regarding the 个克朗: Our teacher is a native speaker, but maybe it is used differently in different regions in China? She explained it this way: you use 块 without further currency explanation for Chinese currency (it is implied). You'd say 1234块美元 for US Dollar, 1234块欧元 for Euros but for Swedish kronor (the course is in Sweden, that's why the topic came up) she said to use 1234个克朗 and that for some reason kuai isn't used here. But she said only to drop the currency description if you're talking about RMB. (Again, not saying that this is right, it's just how she explained it in class). It's also possible that colloquial use allows dropping of ge but since this is a language course they insist on grammatically correct usage. Or something.

 

Anyway, thank you all for helping me! Much appreciated!

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Lu

Your teacher is a native speaker so it's perhaps not good to outright disagree, but I disagree. 30块欧元 is correct, but 30欧 and 30块欧 are also correct, as colloquial forms. (I think 30欧元 is also correct, but less sure there.) 300人民币 is wrong, it must be 300块人民币 or 人民币300元. I've never talked about kronor in Chinese, but if I did I would use 40块克朗 or 40克朗, never with 个. (Unless perhaps there was a pile of 1-kronor coins on a table and someone asked how many 1-kronor coins there were, then 40个克朗 might be correct.)

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Dlezcano

Regarding euro, people use to say 三十欧元 or 三十欧. Fewer people say 三十块欧元 (at least where I live). Also you can use the same system as the one used in China, for instance 一块五 for 1,50 €. 

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889


If you're at an early stage studying Chinese, bear in mind that spoken and formal written Chinese aren't quite the same, just as spoken and written English differ.

 

So 块 as a money unit is common in speech but not in formal writing. And your jiaozi sentence basically works in speech but is a bit too casual for formal writing.

 

Point is, you need to keep the distinction in mind and be clear whether your instructors are talking about 口语 forms.

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cbfunky

I'm indeed at a very early stage, this is only about a month into my first semester at uni. So I think for now I'll stick to what the teacher said, but keeping in mind that when I actually, eventually, at some point use this in written or spoken language, that variations may apply.

 

 

 

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Lu
5 minutes ago, cbfunky said:

I'm indeed at a very early stage, this is only about a month into my first semester at uni. So I think for now I'll stick to what the teacher said, but keeping in mind that when I actually, eventually, at some point use this in written or spoken language, that variations may apply.

Excellent approach. And congrats on taking the first steps on this long and interesting road!

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anonymoose
9 hours ago, cbfunky said:

Regarding the 个克朗: Our teacher is a native speaker, but maybe it is used differently in different regions in China? She explained it this way: you use 块 without further currency explanation for Chinese currency (it is implied). You'd say 1234块美元 for US Dollar, 1234块欧元 for Euros but for Swedish kronor (the course is in Sweden, that's why the topic came up) she said to use 1234个克朗 and that for some reason kuai isn't used here. But she said only to drop the currency description if you're talking about RMB.

 

One thing to bear in mind is that 人民币 is the name of the currency, but not the unit. The unit is 元. Therefore, one does not say 100人民币 but 100元. You can add 人民币 after this to specify that you mean Chinese 元 as opposed to 日元 or 美元.

 

I liken the Chinese situation to the British pound. The British currency is called the sterling, but the sterling is just a name of the currency and not the unit. Therefore, you can say 100 pounds, but not 100 sterling. If you wish to specify that you mean British pounds as opposed to, say, Maltese, then you can add sterling afterwards. (And yes, I know that "pound" is also used as the name of the currency.)

 

I'm not very familiar with kronor, but I suspect kronor is the name of the currency as well as the unit. Thus one could say 100克朗 with 克朗 serving as the unit, or 100个克朗 with 个 serving as the unit (though, to my non-native ears, this sounds awkward).

 

Similary, 欧元 is the name of the unit as well as the name of the currency. Therefore, a separate measure word is not needed. And I agree, often just 欧 is used colloquially.

 

As for 块, I agree that amongst Chinese people, this would generally refer to the 人民币 by default. However, I think this is context dependent. For Chinese Americans, for example, I'm sure 块 could be used to mean US dollars without having to explicitly state 美元. On the other hand, colloquially at least, 刀 seems to be a more frequently used unit.

 

 

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suMMit

I bet if I had said this sentence I'd have added 自己 to emphasize that she makes it.

 

她在家里自己做啤酒。

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889

There's a word for home-brew: 自酿啤酒. Also for bars that brew on premises.

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abcdefg
On 2/15/2021 at 8:46 PM, suMMit said:

I bet if I had said this sentence I'd have added 自己 to emphasize that she makes it.

 

她在家里自己做啤酒。

 

Me too. 

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