Jump to content
Chinese-forums.com
Learn Chinese in China

  • Why you should look around

    Since 2003, Chinese-forums.com has been helping people learn Chinese faster and get to China sooner. Our members can recommend beginner textbooks, help you out with obscure classical vocabulary, and tell you where to get the best street food in Xi'an. And we're friendly about it too. 

    Have a look at what's going on, or search for something specific. We hope you'll join us. 
daydreamer

How to learn two languages at the same time

Recommended Posts

HashiriKata
Is it hard to learn the languages which sentence structure is subject-object-verb (S-O-V)?
Not necessarily. You'll get used to it.
Why is the sentence structure of Korean and Japanese language S-O-V?
It just is. :)

(But if this is not good enough as an answer, please try for yourself and tell me)

Why is the sentence structure of English and Chinese languages S-V-O?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Site Sponsors:
Pleco for iPhone / Android iPhone & Android Chinese dictionary: camera & hand- writing input, flashcards, audio.
Study Chinese in Kunming 1-1 classes, qualified teachers and unique teaching methods in the Spring City.
Learn Chinese Characters Learn 2289 Chinese Characters in 90 Days with a Unique Flash Card System.
Hacking Chinese Tips and strategies for how to learn Chinese more efficiently
Popup Chinese Translator Understand Chinese inside any Windows application, website or PDF.
Chinese Grammar Wiki All Chinese grammar, organised by level, all in one place.

nnt
It just is.

Let it be :)

Science has progressed from the day HOWs questions have replaced WHYs questions :mrgreen:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
nipponman
Why is the sentence structure of Korean and Japanese language S-O-V?

Actually, the idea that Japanese is a s-o-v language is a misnomer. Japanese has no subject order and words can appear in any order, including in the order where the verb comes before the subject*.

Examples:

僕が学校で野球を遣る。

学校で僕が野球を遣る。

野球を僕が学校で遣る。

野球を学校で僕が遣る。

All of these sentences have a slightly different feel, emphasizing a seperate element. But the meaning is the same. *Also, there are situations where you can put the verb before the subject (in highly colloquial speech only)

描き上げよ、絵を。

Here the object is added as an afterthough, not really a set sentence order, but it can happen.

nipponman

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
HashiriKata
Actually, the idea that Japanese is a s-o-v language is a misnomer. Japanese has no subject order and words can appear in any order, including in the order where the verb comes before the subject*.
Very true, nipponman! And in the same way, characterising humans as a creature that moves on two legs is also a "misnomer", because humans sometimes move on four! :mrgreen:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
nipponman
Very true, nipponman! And in the same way, characterising humans as a creature that moves on two legs is also a "misnomer", because humans sometimes move on four!

But changing the order in the sentence is actually quite common.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
HashiriKata
But changing the order in the sentence is actually quite common.

In that case, we should learn to distinguish between "having no word-order" and "having flexible word-order" then? :wink:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
nipponman

What do you mean? If there is no set word order that can be considered correct, then there is no word order...right? Am I missing something?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
HashiriKata
Am I missing something?
I suppose you are. What about try google for "Japanese word-order"? I'm sure it'll give you something to start with.

Good luck!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
nipponman

These sites just repeat the same thing that was said here. This is a good basic approach, but when you become more advanced, you'll need to realize (among other things) that Japanese doesn't have a set sentence order.

8)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
HashiriKata
when you become more advanced, you'll need to realize (among other things) that Japanese doesn't have a set sentence order.
I see now the point you've been trying to assert (and it doesn't seem to have much to do with the language after all :mrgreen: !)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
nipponman

This is actually more of a general 'you', and is not directed at you. But if the shoe fits...

8)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Celso Pin

NNT put as interests Languages and is an IT professional and write things like:

"Learning Hán/Việt is like learning Latin in Europe, or Hieroglyphs in Egypt or relativity theory in Physics: it has the same usefulness/uselessness ."

I dont know about hieroglyphs or Hán/Viêt... but Latin, as far all we know, is the science language... from where you think comes terms like Computer, Delete, Enter, Insert etc???? just to talk about IT...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
nnt
but Latin, as far all we know, is the science language... where you think comes terms like Computer, Delete, Enter, Insert etc???? just to talk about IT...

Pax vobiscum!

:mrgreen:

We all know English (and Maths to a lesser degree) is the present day language of science. Not many scientific papers are actually published in latin as in the days of Newton...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Celso Pin

the technical terms come????

Computer = Computare = calculate

Delete = Delire = erase (just two common examples... we can write 5 books about this...)

off course papers are written in english... with words originate from Latin... Latin is the scholars language... even though not spoken... fix it on the radicals (or roots if you prefer)

then... it is not possible to compare Latin with hierogliphs... tell me one modern word that come from these wonderful egiptian language...

sorry for my poor englis:mrgreen:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Celso Pin

or like Cicero prefers

Quousque tandem abutere patientia mea.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quest
Also, can some Cantonese speakers please tell me if Cantonese really have 9 tones, or just 6 tones in practice? Would knowing just the basic 6 tones be adequate for speaking Cantonese?

Pazu's example:

三碗細牛腩麵 (the first 6 tones) 1 2 3 4 5 6

執隻襪 (the last 3 tones, with t,p,k endings: p,k,t in this case) 1p 3k 6t

Cantonese_Tonediagram.gif

Also, the first tone (level-level) has a level-fall variant.

6 major tones, 3 minor tones and one or two tone variants.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
HashiriKata

Thanks Quest! I'll digest the info slowly and I hopefully may discover something interesting (the interdependency between the 3 minor tones and k,p,t).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
yuet_sien

How difficult will it be to learn Vietnamese, after learning Mandarin for 1 year?

I want to keep up my Mandarin, but I think I have to learn Vietnamese aswell. Going to move to Vietnam next year, for I dunno how long. I am Dutch Chinese who speak a little Cantonese, and doing my second semester here in BJ.

Will my Mandarin (and Cantonese speaking) be helpful to learn Vietnamese or more confusing?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and select your username and password later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Click here to reply. Select text to quote.

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...