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    • PerpetualChange
      3
      Anyone interested in getting a Classical Reading Group going? If so, what are you interested in, and how much could you handle on a weekly or monthly basis?   Personally, I am interested in everything, but mostly Pre-Han materials (Such as Shijing 詩經, Chuci 楚辭, Dao Dejing 道德經).
    • Flickserve
      4
      Picked up this comment from a wechat group.   除了专业的,一般没人说很正规的普通话   Is it unreasonable to learn about other chinese accents? After all, many people learn American accent English in preference to received pronunciation accent  English. Many Chinese people I have spoken to say it is easier to learn American accent English.   Professionals means those working in media.    
    • Milkybar_Kid
      1
      Hello,   I’ve signed up for this course at the University of Manchester starting on 9 October and just wondered if anyone else has studied at this Confucius Institute before? What are the teachers like? (I’ve only been into the reception area and haven’t met any of the teachers yet.)   I passed HSK 5 back in 2015 and am hoping to pass the 6 soon. Has anyone on here taken the above-mentioned course before (perhaps at another Confucius Institute – I’m sure the course materials will all be the same)?   Any help would be appreciated.   Thanks
    • mintaj
      4
      校长对你的回答非常满意 I don't really understend this structure, what is going on with this 对? Can anyone tell me how can i find this grammar structure, how is it called?
    • Luxi
      1
      Many years ago, I bought a probably very useful book to learn to read newspapers from mainland China. I'm sure it was invaluable, but it was so, so boring that I never went beyond Lesson 1. It was published in the early 80s and it was 100% based on articles from the 人民日报. I still read newspapers at a painfully slow speed compared to literature and non-fiction.  I don't know modern textbooks for newspaper reading, maybe others here can give some references,  but I got this today and it looks sort of good. The Table of Contents is a far cry from that 1980s textbook. It seems to be something quite suitable for use in class, but it isn't beyond home use and may be useful as a practice text.   Times: Newspaper Reading Course of Advanced Chinese vol.1 时代: 高级汉语报刊阅读教程 (上). This is actually part of a 2-volumes set, published by BLCU.   The reading texts are about current topics, not overtly political or on-your-face Party propaganda, and actually rather interesting. Each lesson has a main article and several shorter texts on the same or related topics. Apart from a short vocabulary (that needs to be complemented with Pleco &/or Baidu searches), it doesn't have much in the way of explanations. On the plus side, though: there are plenty of 练习, and the lessons can be worked out by relatively advanced intermediate self-learners, or students working with a private tutor. Each volume has a handy Appendix booklet with key sentences extracted from the lessons texts.   I got mine from Purple Culture (they were on offer). Air mail shipping up to 2kg costs £20.66 (not bad if ordering several books at a time) and takes about 10 days, delivered by your local postman. https://www.purpleculture.net/times-newspaper-reading-course-of-advanced-chinese-1-p-11009/   Other sellers (besides Amazon.com and Amazon.co.uk, who seem to have got all Chinese book prices wrong😞)   https://www.cypressbooks.com/proddetail.php?prod=9787561926024 More realistic prices than Amazon UK. The 'Browse Inside' button gives you Table of Contents and a good part of Lesson 1, enough to decide whether you can use the book.   http://www.chinabooks.com/shop/advanced-mandarin-ap-sat-hsk/times-newspaper-reading-course-of-advanced-chinese-1/ Reasonably competitive prices for the US.            
    • Pall
      5
      Characters have two kinds of components, one reflecting the meaning and other sound. But it's more true for traditional characters. When characters were siplified, the phonetic component suffered the most. As a result, only part of the symplified characters have distinct phonetic component.    Moreover,  phonetic components (even those in traditional characters) do not reflect tones usually, but the tones are important.   At the same time it 's the phonetic side, that should be the basis for the inintial grouping of characters.  When we need to put in order a long list of different objects in our mind we should divide them into groups firstly by the feature, which varies less. For example,  objects vary in shape, color and size, and there are 5 sizez, 20 colors and  100 shapes. It's logical to start with the size, then classify the objects by colors and finally by shapes. If one starts with shapes he will embark on the hardest road. That's what some do when they begin with the meaning of the characters, or their meaning components, postponing the task to learn the sound or even rejecting it at all.    There are only about 400 pinyin syllables without accounting for tones and 1200 syllables with tones, and only a part of them is used for more common characters.   Please, find below a table of the HSK5 characters grouped according to their pinyin transcription. It helps to memorize characters, as well as words eventually, better, though some of the potential is linked to the knowledge of Russian. I think, even the first Excel page of it is rather helpful as an additional angle to see the material. It's well-known that we remember something better if it is remembered in different aspects, from different angles.    Moreover,  Chinese words are not words in common sense. They are rather "stable combinations of characters", than words. And some of them are not as stable as others. I read that in a linguistic study and tested it on my own experience.    All Chinese words consisting of 2-4 characters arose from more simple words of only a single character, and the meaning of the words while their creation was associated with the meaning of the initial characters historically, though today in many cases it's not easy to derive it from them.    Anyhow or other there are objective reasons to split the words into charcters and learn characters in addition to learning words or even before that.   Also there are strong practical reasons to do that. When one learns new words in alphabetic languages he does that already knowing the letters. But in Chinese if one encounters a word containing new characters for him, he has to do quite different tasks simultaneously, to learn the characters and to learn the words in their meaning. It's one of the main reasons why it's so difficult to learn Chinese. But it can be easier if he learns "the alphabet" first.    Of course, Chinese "alphabet", if to take characters in this way, is too long. But why not lo learn firstly those letters, which are used in more common words? I came to a conclusion that a good measure of the "common" would be the HSK5 list (HSK4 looks as starter's, whreas HSK6 is too advanced even for many Chinese, as I can guess).  And when you know that, for example, guān can only be 观, 关 or 官 in the HSK5, it's morally easier to remember these characters when you meet them for the first time in your texts. And when you know that guài is present in the list only in the 怪 form, you can be just happy. There are, certainly, other cases, with 16 different characters for shì and 14 for jì. But on the everage it's only 2.03 charcters per pinyin syllable.  The first page of the table, which I uploded, looks as in the picture below. In the uploded version all characters are in black, though.   I marked in violet the known characters and in red those characters that I'd like to learn first.  I chose such taking into account their simplicity and how many components well-known for me they contain. Further, I made another page that include only the known characters and those, which I'm going to learn first. The picture is shown, too. Now I can observe the whole range of my knowledge and would-be knowledge, and to notice some regularities. Please, note, that some characters are shown several times according to their different pronunciation, these are marked with borders. Also, I included only those variants of the neutral tone, which represent seperate characters or cases when the character is used as a syllable of words only in neutral tone (at least in the HSK5).    Then one may apply functional analysis to remember the characters relating to the same pinyin syllables. Or do that only for the most hard characters, since the rest of them can be remembered easier. I made third page with Russian prefixies reflicting all the components of the characters, showing the remaining small details iwith the word "экстра" (extra) in the end when necessary. The screenshot is below. Now I can, reading the prefixes, to imagine the characters in my mind. It's worth to say, that in Russian these prefexes look quite natural, and they're not too long if considering for the amount of the information they include. Only word roots are used here with "o" or "e"  links. In Russian there are many words, consisting of two roots, like паровоз - wapor+to carry, a locomotive, very sinilar to Chinese word creation. There're some such words in English, too.    And finally, there is fourth page. One of the characters corresponding to a syllable is regarded as the main one, it stands on the first place (one that I know better). In the colomn right to the pinyin I give its meaning in capitals. There can be several meanings, but I chose only one, not similar to the meaning of other characters in order not to confuse. For example, in the word 帮助 both characters mean "help" or "to help", so we should give this meaning to only the first one, and for the other to use its additional meaning as "assistant". Other characters in the line corresponding to a syllable are also shown in one of their meanings. Then I created a formula, a phrase that would link the meaning of the "ordinary" characters to the meaning of the main one. For example, for 不/部/布 it is something like "Not a ministry of fabrics". This phrase is written as a note for the first translation, the option being provided be Excel in its latest version ( there is an oppostunity to write a remark and also a general note, I chose the latter form). In the note I put the main word in the first place (in Russian any word order is possible) and underlined it. The words corresponding to the other characters I showed in Italic.    Also there is a coloumn to the left from the pinyin. It's for two things. First, it includes some general idea, linking the characters in the line with the main one. Second, the first letter in the pharse shows the number of characters in the line (initially I showed that with the first letter of last word). It's important to feel the range even when you meet new characters, not present in the list. You may add them to it, but it's better to mark them as "extra".    You may find that the list is not up-to-date. They often change the lists of HSK words, transfer some words from 5 to 6 and back. But it doesn't matter, the uploaded list is just for orientation. You should take somethig as the basis, and that's all.    As to words, consisting of 2-4 characters, we can always connect their meaning to even the single meaning we chose for the characters. And when you have learnt  characters, it's always possible to give additional  meaning to them.    I hope it's helpfull.   The best use of the list can be in combination with the procedure to work with texts described by me in https://www.chinese-forums.com/forums/topic/58727-characters-learning-how-to-proceed-after-radicals/page/3/#comments. Without knowing Russian it also can be used partially.         HSK5 syllables (pinyin&characters).xlsx
    • ClaDriver
      1
      Can anyone translate this for me?  Thank you
    • suMMit
      1
      After reading this thread https://www.chinese-forums.com/forums/topic/59014-chinese-learners-are-forced-into-a-standard-box/page/2/?tab=comments#comment-458885 I thought of this resource I've been using:   I'm not going to write an in depth review, but I thought I'd post a link to a resource I've been quite enjoying. It focuses on listening to normal speed Mandarin and a wide variety of accents ie. Beijing dongbei, guangdong, Sichuan, Shanghai, etc.They are also a variety of ages and personalities. I think its a great resource for improving listening, reinforcing some basic grammar structures and even vocabulary. It features 150 short videos at beginner/elementary/intermediate level, with 6 different people asking 6 other people a  question. You listen first with no aids, then with pinyin and characters, then with English subs, then there are 3 quizzes. The topics are quite varied. It is probably too easy for a high intermediate level. The music in the intro video is kind of cheesy, but there's no music in the actual videos. Its also a bit pricey, but it is obvious that the creator has put a lot of work into this, and the quality shows. It's not incredibly extensive, But doing 3 videos a week, it'll take me a year to complete.  I find it educational and entertaining at the same time.  money was well spent imo.   Here's the link: https://mandarinhq.com/real-spoken-chinese-vault-course/
    • Wahed
      20
      Do foreigners have this or can get this? As far as I can tell (Baidu search), we don't but then how do we utilize services that require this to register such as some of the bicycle sharing programs? Is there an equivalent?
    • Gem
      1
      I am interested to know the process on how a Taiwanese passport holder without national Id work in China. Have recently heard the news that there is no more work permit required for Taiwan nationals as long as they hold the compatriot pass (台胞证).   However, as I do not have any national id, I am unable to get this piece of document. 
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