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    • andreas1974er
      7
      First off all I place this question here, because I hope I will get a serious answer. If not I would go to other love or sex forums. I am interested in the cultural aspects. I could handel the issue by myselfe being with a woman from my own country. I met a Chinese woman (Lives outside Shanghai, 36, child, divorced, owns company) a at an exhibition. We chated for several months. She invited me to Shanghai. Where I am now. We hug a lot and spoke about our feelings. She is very open on the street for the culture here and also hugs sometimes on the street. But when it comes to simple kisses for saying "hello" it seams as if she do not like it. The point is that the "negative" reaction is a little bit strong like something "disgusting". Sorry I do not find other words and it could be I only feel like that bacuase I am not used to that kind of reaction. I do not want to force an answer but asking here I understood that she does not has experience with that. I know that in China these kind of things are not discussed by couples. I understand that someone has less experience but the "negative" reaction is a little bit strong. Has that something to do with the culture ?? What can I do ? Whant to add, that the kissing is in private.
    • Vanderwen
      0
      Hello, I won the scholarship from confucius institute to study in Tianjin 外语大学. Do you have any recommendations or advice for people going to Tianjin? Also it will be very helpful to make a Wechat group with the people who are going to Tianjin for the first time this semester.  
    • jessica1995
      5
      I am an ESL teacher, new to teaching students from China. One of my first classes I have is with a student named chenxi. How is this name pronounced, and in what order? Is it Chen Xi  or Xi Chen?
    • Flickserve
      2
      Read carefully.   Changed the name of the place to Singapore and it gave the same sort of Chinese translation.
    • jiaojiao87
      22
      Hello!   What known-word percent do people here tend to  recommend before reading a text?   As an example, according to Chinese Text Analyser I know 91% of the words in 活着.  The words I don't recognize all are single appearances.  However, knowing only 9 out of ever 10 words feels like it would still significantly hamper understanding and slow down/hamper smooth reading.   Just curious what people here think.    
    • Jon Long
      0
      Steps: Screen-copy a region (Mac: Ctrl+Cmd+Shift+4; PC: use the nipping tool) Go to 百度翻译 Select the input text field Paste (Mac: Cmd+V; PC: Ctrl+V) 百度翻译 is better than Yandex for this purpose because Yandex inserts spaces after each character.
    • edelweis
      8
      How should I pronounce these? (from the books 330 Chinese patterns) I tend to say 跑着跑着 pao2zhe5 pao3zhe5 and 走着走着 zou3zhe5 zou3zhe5 not sure why...
    • marcop1
      2
      I'm going to be studying in China for 2 years. I was filling the visa form last night was really confused what to fill in the itinerary section.  Should I just write 09-10-19 to 09-10-21 and the name of the university? Any help would be really appreciated.
    • Jon Long
      0
      HSK (Hanyu Shuiping Kaoshi) is the Chinese-language proficiency test in China. The test is divided into 6 levels, with level 6 being the most advanced.   The old HSK (prior to 2010) had 11 levels requires that you know 77% more words than the current HSK.   BCT (Business Chinese Test) is just HSK for people holding a phone and wearing suits.   YCT (Youth Chinese Test) is just HSK for kids.   TOCFL is the language test in Taiwan. It's also divided into 6 levels, but it requires you to know 59% more words than the HSK.
    • 蓝鸟
      1
      Hi everyone,   I would like to introduce my new Chinese study app for iOS, Ink Code. I am also the developer for one of the earliest Chinese learning apps on App Store, iLearn Chinese, which some of you may have used. While both apps teach how to write Chinese characters, iLearn Chinese focuses more on the etymology of Chinese characters and covers a relatively smaller set of characters (in the range of several hundred), whereas Ink Code concentrates more on... well, the writing of a lot more characters. Ink Code currently has the writing demonstrations and practices for nearly 3000 characters, which covers all HSK 1 to 6 and AP Chinese exams.      Besides character writings, Ink Code also has a strong Pinyin annotation functionality. You can paste copied Chinese text, type in the URL of a Chinese page, or just snap an image with Chinese text, and display the pinyin right above the characters.            Furthermore, if you select some text in a Pinyin annotated view (by either medium-long tap or just drag the selection cursor), you'll get the Chinese words and their meanings. And the Chinese words will further be broken down into characters and writings.                                    The app is free for download, so as the pinyin annotation, image snapping (OCR) and text analysis functionalities. I have some promo codes for the in-app purchase Advanced Characters (HSK 3 to 6), let me know if you want to try it out.   Thanks for your attention!
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