Jump to content
Chinese-forums.com
Learn Chinese in China

  • Why you should look around

    Since 2003, Chinese-forums.com has been helping people learn Chinese faster and get to China sooner. Our members can recommend beginner textbooks, help you out with obscure classical vocabulary, and tell you where to get the best street food in Xi'an. And we're friendly about it too. 

    Have a look at what's going on, or search for something specific. We hope you'll join us. 
  • Latest Topics

    • NinjaTurtle
      0
      http://www.asahi.com/ajw/articles/AJ201811120058.html   Ranking of major countries and regions in English proficiency 1 Sweden 2 Netherlands 3 Singapore 4 Norway 5 Denmark 6 South Africa 7 Luxembourg 8 Finland 9 Slovenia 10 Germany 30 Hong Kong 31 South Korea 32 Spain 34 Italy 35 France 42 Russia 47 China 48 Taiwan 49 Japan 53 Brazil 87 Iraq 88 Libya   (cont.)
    • liu.engineer
      3
      Hey everybody! I've seen that the question has already been asked multiple times but it has been a while so I thought I would ask again and get updated answers! I am know preparing to study Chinese full time in China next year. I had made my decision to take BLCU's intensive class but after a little research I've found out that many complains about their dorms and many don't recommend the intensive course because it is better to spend the extra hours out with Chinese people. Many talks about how many international students there are in BLCU and how big their classes are. Tsinghua on the other hand has higher ranking and is considered one of the best universities in the world. What are your recommendations and for you who have studied at the Chinese program at Tsinghua, how would you describe it? You are also more than welcome to recommend other universities that have long-term programs.  
    • fabiothebest
      4
      Today is 11.11 (Singles' day in China) so there are many discounts online. Taobao is going crazy  I stumbled across a discount code for Chinesepod if anyone is interested (code: "SINGLESDAY" gives you 51% off the annual or the quarterly premium subscription). Note: I'm not in any way affiliated with them, don't consider this as advertisement. I'm just a person learning Chinese and if there's a way of saving, why not. Do you know of any other valid discount codes for other well known websites like Skritter, The Chairman's Bao or others? I'd like to purchase a subscription to some of them in order to boost my Chinese learning.
    • roddy
      0
      Just went out on the BACS list, so I'd suspect anyone interested has already seen it (and probably already has an application in progress) but just in case:   https://www.ed.ac.uk/literatures-languages-cultures/graduate-school/fees-and-funding/funding/masters-students/other-funding/esrc-msc-phd-studentships   Edinburgh is of course home to many important historical features, such as Edinburgh Castle and me. Do join us. 
    • LiMo
      16
      I recently applied for some freelance translation in a field I'm familiar with. At least I thought I was familiar with it, according to the agency my test translation was not up to scratch. Seeing as it was my first try I suppose it's not surprising, but I didn't find it hard which in my experience usually means I did pretty well. They didn't give me any feedback, unfortunately, so I've decided to bare all and come here in the hopes of gaining some insight into where I went wrong. I'll post it below and maybe someone with more experience can point out any major mistakes. Thanks in advance!     遺傳多樣性與物種多樣性是生物多樣性的兩個基本層次,前者主要體現在種群內個體間的遺傳變異程度,後者主要體現在一個群落內物種的數量以及 每個物種的個體在群落中的分布均勻程度。Antonovics 指出,影響種群遺傳多樣性與群落物種多樣性的因素是相似的,即它們之間可能存在正相關性。然而,由於遺傳多樣性與物種多樣性為分屬不同學科的研究內容,關於二者之關系的研究在隨後的20多年裏並沒有實質性的進展。但是,近十年來開展的系列研究表明,環境特征可能對種群遺傳多樣性與群落物種多樣性產生平行效應。     Genetic diversity and species diversity are the two basic levels of biological diversity. The former is mainly embodied by the degree of genetic variation between individuals within a population. The latter is reflected in the quantity of species in a community, and the distribution of individuals between each species in a community. Antonovics points out that the factors influencing population genetic diversity and community species diversity are similar. Namely, there is a direct correlation between their mutual probabilities of existence. However, because genetic diversity and species diversity are the research subjects of different scientific disciplines, after more than 20 years, research into their relationship has yet to see any substantial progress. Nevertheless, a series of studies developed over the past 10 years have demonstrated that environmental characteristics can produce parallel effects on both population genetic diversity and community species diversity.   生境面積會對群落內物種的數量及種群大小產生影響。隨著生境面積的減少,群落內不同種群的規模也可能隨之減小。對於某些小種群而言,遺傳漂變很可能使種群內某些等位基因隨機丟失,造成遺傳多樣性的降低;遺傳多樣性降低的同時,一些個體數較小的種群也可能會產生局域滅絕,使群落物種多樣性降低。然而,因為等位基因和物種以花粉或種子擴散等方式在種群及群落間移動,由漂變而隨機降低的種群遺傳多樣性與群落物種多樣性又會隨之得以補充。因此,生境面積與隔離程度可能通過影響漂變、遷移等生態學過程,對種群遺傳多樣性與群落物種多樣性產生平行效應。   Habitat area can influence species number and population size within a community. The intra-community extent of different species is likely to also decrease as habitat area decreases. As far as some small populations are concerned, genetic drift is likely to cause certain alleles in the population to be randomly lost, leading to a decrease in genetic diversity; at the same time as genetic diversity is decreasing, some populations with few individuals may experience local extinction, thus decreasing community species diversity. However, because alleles and species, like pollen or seeds, are mobile throughout populations and communities, a population’s genetic diversity and a community’s species diversity that are decreased by drift and stochasticity, may in turn be replenished by these same mechanisms. Therefore, habitat area and degree of isolation can, through their effects on drift, migration and other ecological processes, produce parallel effects on population genetic diversity and community species diversity.     (Noticed I put 10 instead of ten 🙄)  
    • mungouk
      2
      I was interested in what @Tomsima was saying in this blog about student interpreters training to remember long sections of speech and it led me to wonder if there are any specific techniques you can use to hold a sentence in your head when doing the listen-and-repeat questions in HSKK.   At the moment I'm having trouble recalling even sentences as short as 我们的生活每天都在发生变化。   It feels as though as soon as I hear a word I'm not sure of, it throws my short-term memory off track and I forget most of the rest of the sentence.  In theory I should be able to repeat the sounds I've heard, but if feels like understanding is "getting in the way".   Conversely, hearing a common sequence of words such as 每天多, 他们的, 昨天晚上, is easier to recall because I hear and remember it as a single "chunk".   I need to improve drastically on these questions before I sit HSKK 中级 in 3 weeks' time... I'm doing the tests with my teacher in my 1:1 lessons, with her reading the questions out and helping me out, and this is useful.   I'm also starting to realise I probably need to learn all the HSK 4 level vocabulary to avoid stumbling over words like 发生 which I hadn't come across yet, so I will work on that.   But I wondered if anyone has any tips, tricks or techniques to share which could improve listening-and-repeating?  
    • Luxi
      3
      Just when one thought Chinese news reporting couldn't get any worse... https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-46136504   Quote   Xinhua News claims the presenter "can read texts as naturally as a professional news anchor", though not everyone may agree... ...Xinhua says the presenters can "work" 24 hours a day on its website and social media channels, "reducing news production costs".     The Chinese bot sounds much better than the (allegedly) English, but a 4 seconds sample without challenging words like 'Panama' (stress on 2nd syllable) isn't convincing enough  全球首个“AI合成主播”在新华社上岗
    • xanagrisx
      2
      Hello all! I would like to ask if it is compulsory to return back to your homeland upon graduation. My plan is to work in China after graduating, but I am not too sure if that is possible. Please advise.  I am aiming for the Bachelor degree.  Thank you so much! 
    • LiMo
      4
      The title may seem a bit contradictory but I'll outline my background and career prospects. Hopefully someone with experience in this area can get back to me.   I've just finished my masters in Advanced Chinese Studies and I'm unsure where to go career-wise. I've got that annoyingly mid-level Chinese that is good enough to do academic stuff (just about) but still nowhere near good enough to take most of the jobs that require a Chinese speaker/reader. I have odd bits of experience here and there, and a big field change from natural science to " the humanities" (I spent most of my time reading social science, but it will say Master of Arts on my degree certificate). Not sure how that plays but my girlfriend is convinced that "Chinese studies" will drive people away like the plague.    While translation doesn't appeal as a full-time career, I thought it might be useful to have it as a backup, and obviously having a proper qualification is good for reassuring clients. I couldn't stand doing another masters, and it simply wouldn't be worth the money, which is why the DipTrans looks promising. However, it's not cheap either, at around £650 pounds for the three papers + registration fees. On top of that, I hear it's pretty darn hard even for people who've got some real world experience. People seem to recommend doing preparation courses, but that adds another few hundred quid, if not more. So maybe a £1000 all told.    Initially I was a little overconfident (alright, downright cocky) and paid £25 up front for access to the past-papers with the full intention of doing a bit of cramming and then passing the exam. However, upon further research it sounds pretty daunting: no electronic dictionaries, you need to bring hard copies and that means shelling out again for stuff I've already bought on pleco (almost gave up there, I hate unnecessary expenditures); the examiners are old school, I see people recommending style guides to brush up on your English; the pass rate is pretty darn low, in the 30% range I heard. Overall it seems like it will be no mean feat to pass this and it's not even my main goal.   Now my reservations hinge mostly on money. Although I'm really against taking a course, if I get a job in the meantime then, because I live at home, I think the expense wouldn't be anywhere near as painful as it is right now. However, I'd still rather not spend the money if the return on investment is too low for a casual translator with low work volume. The way things are nowadays experience is everything and I don't really trust that having the qualification would be all that helpful to fall back on if I don't have serious experience to back it up. It would be nice to hear from translators, especially anyone who's taken the exam. Just how hard was it? Did you need to take a course to prepare? How was your career before and after gaining the qualification?
    • Amy861
      12
      Would love to know what my artwork says.  Thanks Amy 
  • Popular Contributors

    1. 1
      Tomsima
      Tomsima
      18
    2. 2
      889
      889
      13
    3. 3
      陳德聰
      陳德聰
      13
    4. 4
      roddy
      roddy
      11
    5. 5
      Publius
      Publius
      9
×