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  1. Just to give an update: still stuck in my apartment (6 weeks+ now I think? Losing track of time...). The good news is that the food situation is better, getting food is no longer difficult. Buying random stuff (100%+ markup of course) is relatively easy with group-buys, but getting specific stuff you actually want is still hard. Mentally the whole situation is really taking a toll on me (and everyone...), it just feels so freaking hopeless. 6 weeks in and my xiaoqu is still seeing cases everyday. How many and and why we dont know, because our juweihui sucks and dont tell us anything. Have some friends that got allowed to occasionally leave their compound due to no cases the last month that suddenly got 2 new cases yesterday and are now locked again. It really feels like the 0 case goal is impossible. At this point seeing Beijing getting more cases actually makes me happy, I'm already way past caring about other people. Let the guys up there that are deciding these policies suffer as well, lock down all those guys that think this is a "Shanghai is shitty"-problem only. I know this aint a very nice or healthy attitude, but am in a revolutionary mood lately. Exhausted
    7 points
  2. I've always liked English loan words seamlessly woven into Chinese grammar. Best-known example is I think 'O不OK'; more recently the phrase 'hold住' was fashioable. I'm not sure if others like this too, and if we perhaps already have a thread for it somewhere, but today I ran into a lovely sentence in this category and I wanted to share it. So here it is: A few women were talking about holidays. One said that Nice (in France) has good night clubs, to which another replied: 带着小孩子你night什么club啊。
    6 points
  3. I'll like to share with you a website myself and other Chinese language learners have been working on over the last few months https://heavenlypath.notion.site/ Some of you may be familiar with the reading guide and resource I posted a while back. We've moved all of that onto a new website, so that everything is in one place. You'll find recommendations on TV dramas, variety show, audiobooks, books, games and much more. We also have guides on various topics including our famous reading guide (From Beginner to Native novels), a brand new reading speed guide and a guide to native reading apps and platforms. New media, resources and guides are added regularly. We're currently working on a listening guide, and a guide on Chinese Mythology and Legends. So be sure to check it regularly. Recommendations, suggestions and feedback is always welcome, so please do let me know if you have any thoughts or questions.
    6 points
  4. Well, despite all the work I put in, I failed the HSK6: Listening 52, Reading 63, Writing 55. So a total of 170 (and 180 is usually considered a pass). My marks are nowhere near any of the goals I set for myself. I don't think I'm the first person to feel their HSK6 marks were awful the first time around. (By the way, in the month between taking the test, and receiving my marks, I read a full novel 《喜欢你,我也是》.)
    6 points
  5. It's sweet of you to want to help your little brother, but completing this exercise won't help him with his Chinese classes. He needs to actually learn the vocabulary, because he'll need it again later on. He should ask the teacher for a vocab list, or a classmate for notes, so that he can catch up and then make the exercise himself.
    5 points
  6. It could be going sideways as well as ahead, though. I picked up Chinese Through Poetry by Archie Barnes and am enjoying it immensely - I'm now able to read, contemplate and enjoy (relatively simple) actual Chinese poems from more than 1000 years ago. That was never something on my to-do list!
    5 points
  7. To clarify my situation a bit, this is unlikely to be a role where I will use Chinese day-to-day, if at all. The reason I want to include it on my resume is because I want to show: (1) my interest in China and Chinese culture, which I think a Chinese company might appreciate, and (2) demonstrate that I have seriously dedicated myself to a challenging hobby over several years. I am absolutely not interested in lying on or embellishing my resume. In fact, I would prefer to understate my abilities so that I can over-perform if asked to demonstrate them. Thanks you all for the suggestions so far, I appreciate the feedback.
    5 points
  8. Get到 is another one.
    5 points
  9. Thanks for your very detailed input @becky82 — your notes on taking HSK 5 and HSK 6 are very useful. I took HSK 5 ("online, at home" version) last Saturday, along with HSKK 高级 — which was compulsory and almost doubled the cost, despite not being one of my goals at all — and I have definitely failed both of them, regardless of waiting for the official result. Up until HSK 4 I had passed everything first time, but I realise now that I massively underestimated the huge gap between level 4 and 5, and I committed to doing the exam far too early. You live and learn.
    5 points
  10. I'm not sure why my comment was deleted, but I will try again. My point was that the resource guide, well-intentioned as it is, is an example of "the curse of knowledge" at work. This is a well-documented psychological phenomenon in which we mistakenly assume that our audience already understands certain things that we know. So we don't explain things that should be explained. It is a blind spot that we're all subject to and that one can learn to overcome - if one wants to and if one doesn't simply dismiss those who can't follow along as ___ (insert some negative adjective there). For instance, I once met someone who loved classical music but had had no musical education whatsoever. I pulled out a recorder and said, "I'll teach you to play a scale." He responded, "What's a scale?" My mouth fell open. It wasn't that he was stupid, or even that he was ignorant. It was that it had never occurred to me that knowing nothing might include not knowing what a scale was. I'd never met anyone who didn't know that. But if I were a teacher, or providing music-related information, I would communicate better and include more people in my audience realizing that some people did not know what a scale was. Unless I was 100% certain that I wanted not to offer anything to people at that level.
    5 points
  11. I bought some new books recently and don't think most of them have been mentioned here. They make up what's now called the 'How to Read Chinese Literature' series, either written or edited by Zong-qi Cai. How to Read Chinese Poetry (2008): Goes through each poetry era/style with lots of translated poems. A decent survey of Chinese classical poetry, whether you can read Chinese or not. Mentioned previously on these forums. How to Read Chinese Poetry Workbook (2012) A companion to the first book but for people who are learning to read Chinese poetry, so pinyin, vocabulary and modern Chinese translations accompany a new set of 100 Classical poems and their English translations. How to Read Chinese Poetry in Context (2018) Essays, all in English, on poetry from antiquity to the Tang. If you study western literature in the west you'd expect to read stuff like this. How to Read Chinese Prose (2022) Lots of classical Chinese prose pieces translated into English and then discussed, for what they mean, why they're so good etc. Don't need to be able to read Chinese. How to Read Chinese Prose in Chinese (2022) This is a kind of companion, for people studying Classical Chinese: more texts (and some that overlap), but this time the original Chinese text is the focus, with vocab and grammar notes as well as translations into modern Chinese and English. How to Read Chinese Drama (2022) Don't have this but seems to be an introduction/appreciation and anthology to Chinese drama, no Chinese required. Of these six books, three are subtitled "A Guided Anthology": How to Read Chinese Poetry, How to Read Chinese Prose, and How to Read Chinese Drama. I would say that How to Read Chinese Poetry Workbook and How to Read Chinese Prose in Chinese are the companions to the anthologies, for people who know some of, or are studying, the Classical language. That leaves How to Read Chinese Poetry in Context, which seems to be more designed to give you a thorough and almost more academic grounding in Chinese poetry and poetics. Early days cos I only bought most of these recently but I'm really happy to find so much material in English that's designed to give a real understanding of Chinese literature (rather than simply saying this is a famous poem and this is what it means). The two prose books in particular are a revelation! More details here: http://cup.columbia.edu/series/how-to-read-chinese-literature. And amazon lets you 'look inside' so see a preview.
    4 points
  12. I might finally do an HSK exam this year so I looked at an HSK textbook properly for I think the first time - the official one, 标准教程 / Standard Course HSK6. Wow it's boring! The texts are so uninspiring, they feel crammed with grammar/words rather than flowing at all naturally, and lots of the topics are so not interesting. I feel that the textbooks from the old 北京语言大学 course or the Road To Success series often had texts you could really get your teeth into. But maybe that's my memory playing tricks on me. I did see that @OneEye did an excellent livestream last year on intermediate and advanced textbooks, mainly Taiwan ones and mainly ones used by ICLP. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vMUqwb1kMdY It appears he used textbooks the same way as me, listening and listening and listening to the audio of a text before finally opening the textbook to look at first the new words and then finally the full text. I hadn't realised that was primarily an ICLP method - at a mainland university many years ago I had to buy a bunch of cassettes (and a walkman) ago to help me memorise the texts, as we were supposed to do before class. As has been mentioned before, native or lightly edited native speaker texts, with high quality audio, glosses on some unfamiliar vocabulary and grammar points, and exercises to reinforce and internalise that new information: hard to beat, when done right! (And those ICLP textbooks, Thought & Society and an Independent Reader, are done so right.) But perhaps a super-high percentage of people only use the HSK textbooks these days?
    4 points
  13. Interesting. I wonder if your response kind of highlights the different approaches people have towards textbooks. For some people, they are just a collection of texts that you simply read to understand, and then maybe learn any new vocab, and quickly move on. So I think I now understand when people say 'you should quickly move on to native-speaker materials'. And that's absolutely one good path to follow. But another way of using textbook texts - and this includes the ICLP way - is to study the text so intensively that you've basically memorised it all. So that, without the textbook in front of you, you can still discuss every single sentence, the meaning of every sentence, and you can use the grammar or pattern or vocabulary of every sentence to construct and drill new sentences. For the first method (read-to-understand and move on) the quality of the texts probably isn't so important. But for the second method, of course it's super important. It's got to be really useful grammar/vocab, because you don't want to spend so much time listening to and analysing and memorising texts that don't have anything useful in them And the point of that Thought & Society book is that every text is jam-packed with useful things, that's what makes it special. You move from 'kind of understanding that grammar/pattern because you've seen it before' to being able to internalise it, use it, welcome it when you next come across it because now you understand how and why a native speaker wants to use it themselves. So in short, each 15 minutes of audio (the length of each text in the book) requires about 8 hours of listening and preparation!
    4 points
  14. Artist's name is 黄雄. Really hard to read but fortunately the last seal confirms it. The rest says 一九八七年十二月廿五日于星湖水月宫 (probably this place)
    4 points
  15. I still remember, at an earlier stage than you, really struggling with complements of direction. In the end I gave up trying to grasp them conceptually, and just memorised a few simple sentences that used them correctly and naturally. I think as adults there are ways we can use our brains to learn faster than how children learn languages, but where that doesn't seem to be working, then instead just repeat and repeat until it's internalised. So I'd suggest you work with your teacher to construct a very small handful of simple sentences that include the grammar point you're struggling with - sentences where the context (e.g. forks/left handed!) is real and makes complete sense to you. Then just repeat them a few times every day for a couple of weeks.
    4 points
  16. Thanks for this recommendation. I just finished reading it. I have to say that it very much dampened my interest in seeking out contemporary Chinese fiction written in Chinese! For those who don't have the time or money to read the book, I'll summarize some of the most striking points in it. Censorship of Chinese fiction takes place at the level of bookstores and publishers, not at the level of punishment of authors. Chinese writers of controversial works can have their work available in foreign languages without repercussions in China. Works can disappear at a moment's notice for reasons that remain unclear. Many showplace bookstores contain shelves and shelves full of fake books! (She doesn't speculate much on the reasons for this.) Fiction is a significantly smaller percentage of the book industry in China than in the US. This commentator takes an extremely negative view of the webnovel industry. She points out that only those who can sustain extremely high daily character counts see success. The marketplace thus rewards those who created convoluted, almost endless plots like those of video games. These pitiable authors have to be productivity machines and can be ruthlessly and severely censored at any time. Imagine having thousands of pages of stuff you wrote get disappeared in an instant! There is no incentive for writing quality in this industry. There are an excellent few pages in Chapter 6 on China's current paradoxical longing for the countryside. In her whole book, only Chinese science fiction comes off well from a literary standpoint. I had hoped to finish the book with some suggestions to add to my reading list, but since I'm not interested in sci-fi, not one item mentioned caught my interest enough for that.
    4 points
  17. Well, we're all waiting to see if we get locked down or not. It is interesting though that cnn, bbc shows videos of empty grocery stores in BJ and long snaking around the block covid test lines. All the stores in my neighborhood are full and I have done 3 covid tests this week and have waited about 3 mins for each.
    4 points
  18. The pomodoro technique works for me (he typed while procrastinating on Chinese-Forums).
    4 points
  19. Moshen is not selling anything, and is listing courses that specifically help with what you're trying to do. You are of course free to not use any courses and forge your own path, but it's not very nice to cast suspicions on people who are trying to help you and answer your questions.
    4 points
  20. before i write up little program called VideoSubFinder to extract hard-coded subtitle from videos and generating srt files. https://www.chinese-forums.com/forums/topic/61897-extract-hard-subtitle-in-chinese-clip/#comment-484565 that program involves little hand work to complete the task. today i introduce the GUI tool for extracting hard-coded subtitle from videos and generating srt. file. it’s simple and streamlined to complete the task and with the power of deep learning it can more accurately scan and recognize the text. also, its include all dependencies so not so tech-savvy people can use this app. plus you can use this app for mac os too. 1 .download executable from GitHub. 2. click vse.exe and open the app. 3. set the green frame around hard subtitle. 4. wait some minutes and its done. https://github.com/YaoFANGUK/video-subtitle-extractor/blob/main/README_en.md
    4 points
  21. We're aware that it isn't perfect, and there's definitely room for improvement. It's why I asked for suggestions and feedback, hoping for some detailed construction feedback that we can action. All I really wanted was a further explanation and clarification of what needs demystifying. This is an example of "the curse of knowledge" here, no? Like you're assuming I know what you know and what you don't know? I was hoping you'll be able to point out more specifically which phases, words etc that is confusing, so that it's super clear where the knowledge gap is. More information means we can provide better guides that will help learners. I just wanted more details... We're really not deliberately pushing people away, I don't really know where that came from. We're not professional or teachers, we're just a bunch of learners trying to help out the community, in our spare time between work and school.
    4 points
  22. Given your relationship, I don't think you're in a position to really help her. Reporting it to the platform is more likely to harm her further than to get her help, so I wouldn't do that. You can just quietly leave and not say anything. That would be fine, you have no further obligations to your online teacher. But I agree with Amy that you could tell her that you're worried about her. Hopefully this will perhaps nudge her a little towards the realisation that she should seek help. Or perhaps it will do nothing at all, but it's about the most you can do. And I'm sorry that you're in this position. It's an awful feeling to see someone hurt like this and be basically completely unable to do anything about it.
    4 points
  23. @MoshenThere must be a misunderstanding, we're not deliberately targeting those that are familiar with Chinese media. All this started from conversations many many months ago where members of our Discord community were looking for Chinese content they could try that were graded by level, it slowly went from a spreadsheet to this website. My apologies if I gave you the wrong impression. Like I said, we only started this a few months ago and it all takes time. This is just something myself and others work on when we have free time, it isn't our full time job. Thanks for your feedback. I've noted down that down that we need detailed guides to help learners start to use these platforms. In the mean time, you can try out Himalaya (international Ximalaya) if you're into audiobooks or podcast, you can keep the UI in English and switch the content to Chinese and it'll give you recommendations in Chinese. That's the same for a manhua (Chinese comic) app called Bilibili Comic, again you can keep the UI in English and switch the content to Chinese. Both of these can be downloaded from Apple or Google app store. Both are made for international/oversea users, so you can login with Facebook/Google etc. I find these to be quite nice for getting into native content without taking the massive step into those crazy Chinese websites. Apologies, this isn't very detailed, but there's only so much I can write here without spending hours writing a full blown guide. I can see you're quite frustrated, you must have been trying to find something to help you get into native platforms for a while?
    4 points
  24. I will give it a try. I think the main character is exactly the same as the seal below it 狼 = wolf The text on the right hand side seems to be the year 丁卯年 兔年 = Maybe 1927 or 1987? The text on the left hand side is way beyond my capabilities unfortunately.
    3 points
  25. Finally finished Hsk-4上. Took me six months. That's a bit slow but I'm simultaneously studying the Chinese Made Easier 4 book and almost halfway through that as well. The CME and Hsk series have a different focus, but also overlap in many places. Tomorrow I will break the seal on the 4下 book. I definitely feel it's getting harder, but not overly difficult, so I think Im at my sweet spot.
    3 points
  26. I have made a few things in the steamer. I haven't yet watched the video recipes, though it's on my list of things to do. What I've tried so far has just been following my wife's instructions (她当然用中文教我). All pretty good, so far.
    3 points
  27. 朱毅勇 Zhu Yi yong I am not sure if he is the guy you are looking for. here is some sample of him.
    3 points
  28. This. Mine went gradually from study goals to career goals: from 'read a full book in Chinese' to 'translate a book' to 'get put on a stage to talk about something I have expertise in'. (with lots of years and steps in between). If your reasons to learn Chinese have nothing to do with either career or family/social life, you'll still find new goals. Read a more difficult novel/watch a more fast-talking drama without a dictionary. Discuss the novel/drama with a group of excited native speakers. There's always the next step.
    3 points
  29. I agree with this. 'Fluent' and 'conversational' and whatnot can mean different things to different people, so if your language ability is going to be important to actually do the job, the company/client would be wise to test that, regardless of whether your resume says 'fluent' or 'HSK 6' or 'C1'. And even if they didn't test it, the applicant would be wise to not over-promise too much. For resumes, I'd recommend over-selling a bit, but not to the point of lying of course. From what I know, resumes are usually read with the assumption that the applicant is over-selling a little bit. That means that if I read 'conversational', I would interpret that as 'can talk about hobbies and order food', so in your case I would aim a bit higher. 'Proficient', 'some working proficiency', something along those lines. Native English speakers and more recent resume writers may have better ideas.
    3 points
  30. It can be a good idea to leave those extra look-ups to the end of your study session. First of all, it turns five chances for distraction into one. Second, it's more realistic - sometimes you're not going to be able to do extra look-ups, you'll have to work with the information available at the time. Obviously if you are completely stuck, you might need to look for more help. But if you're reading a book and wondering "Hmmm, I can tell this word is some kind of dog, but is it a husky or an Alsatian?" it can wait.
    3 points
  31. As someone who has been involved in a few recruitments, and incidentally have read quite a few resumes, I strongly resent this. It must be the single worst suggestion I've ever read regarding job hunting in my entire life. Yeah, it goes through the HR system, but people do read them and if someone lies in a resume to us, and especially if it is pertinent to the job, they may get into an interview, but the lie is likely going to be revealed there and they will have shown that they are a dishonest person. We would never hire someone like that. If they make it through the interviews, then it is going to certainly come out during the probationary period. They'll get let go and will have wasted a lot of their own time and the company's resources with their dishonesty since the recruitment will have to be started over. I think this is about how it goes in any respectable Finnish company at least. Can't see why it would be different elsewhere. @dakonglong, how about reading through the CEFRL level descriptions and pick the one that sounds about right. There is probably some mapping with that to what is commonly meant with "Conversational" or "Limited Working Proficiency". But I wonder if those have any clear definitions. If you think that you could get through a work related internal meeting with someone in Chinese, then I'd call that Limited Working Proficiency. Or you could meet with a teacher who teaches business Chinese and ask where they would put you.
    3 points
  32. Go to a library or something similar to study? (Or even just a different room.) I often study in food courts. Outside of lunch hours, there are not many people, but still have good lighting. And since it's a shared space, I don't feel pressured into buying overpriced coffee like at Starbucks.
    3 points
  33. As a native Chinese, I have a few recommendations. 1 Create a WeChat account and search for topics in which you are interested. You will find lots of official accounts, we call them 公众号. There are many amazing ones and you can read lots of stuff in depth. 2 Download a few apps, like 今日头条、知乎、微信读书. If you work for Tech companies, I recommend 虎嗅 and 36氪. They are really helpful. Feel free to let me know if you have further questions.
    3 points
  34. 加油 @becky82 and @mungouk. Keep on plugging away and you'll eventually get it.
    3 points
  35. Is it Octonauts (海底小纵队)?! I didn't expect anyone to like that, thought it'll be too childish for most people. If you like sort of thing, you should try 喜羊羊与灰太狼. For anyone that's reading this, donghua isn't just cartoons for children. There's also donghua for adults (similar to Japanese anime is for adults). For anyone who's interested, try 刺客伍六七 (Scissor Seven) on Netflix, it's weird and super funny...and definitely very adult (lots of adult jokes!), not suitable for children!
    3 points
  36. I think the disconnect happening in this thread is that on these forums, you're finding the first group of people, while you and your contributers have been moving among the second group, and indeed belong to that group. The first group doesn't realise there is an entire ocean of content out there that they don't know about; the second group doesn't realise their knowledge is niche. I hope your list of resources can be a bridge between the two groups, that the first group can cross easily if they wish to do so. To that end, I hope that people here who don't understand something can point that out politely, and that you can then accomodate them. Your site is an amazing resource, thanks again for putting it together!
    3 points
  37. You may know me as one of the authors of the Heavenly Path reading guide, we’ve recently moved this guide to a new location, along with our webnovels and books resources. We hope this is a much better format than the previous Google Docs and Spreadsheet. I thought I’ll share with you my experience of spending 18 months reading original Chinese novels everyday, novels I had previously never read in any other form. I jumped straight into original work because reading something like Harry Potter in Chinese just didn’t interest to me. As well as reading, I also regularly watch Chinese TV but just so I don’t bored you to death, I’m only going to focus on reading, passive vocabulary, and from intermediate onwards. Maybe I’ll talk about the other aspects in another post in the future. My reading method and word review technique When it comes to reading, it’s really simple, I don’t do any unknown word extraction or pre-learning, I simply open the book either on Chrome or Readibu and start reading with a popup dictionary. I would note down unknown words, then after my daily reading session is over, I would go through that list and pick some words to add to my Pleco deck. I decide these words in a very subjective manner, literally do I think it’s useful to me, have I seen this before and am I likely to see this again. As for reviewing words with SRS, it’s super simple. I’m using the Pleco SRS flashcard add-on. I have most settings set to the default, and I do a review once a day. Pleco would display the word in Chinese characters only, I say the word out loud (recite the definition in my head if I need to), and then ask Pleco will reveal the pinyin, definition and play the audio. I would then give myself a score of 1-6. Sometimes if I struggle with certain words I would look up example sentences in Baidu Fanyi, write them down and then write my own sentences with those words. If I need further help, I’ll ask on Discord. The beginning... Before jumping into native novels, I read short children’s bedtime stories on https://www.qigushi.com/baobao/ for a few months to prep myself for literature style text. End of September 2020 was when I decided to start my first native novel. At the time, I had around 1,700 words in my Pleco deck, which I had collected from day one of my learning journey. I picked up a children’s novel called 舒克和贝塔历险记, which was recommended to me by a native. Following on from 舒克和贝塔历险记, I read 大林和小林,秃秃大王,小布头奇遇记,小布头新奇遇记 and 没有风的扇子. Even though these were all children’s books aimed at 6-7 years olds, I found them to be really difficult at the time. I had to do it slowly, and at times I had to spread a chapter over two days. Slowly as the weeks went by, it became easier and easier as I learnt more words. I felt that I jumped into native books too early, as I had a real difficult time at the beginning. I later discovered https://chinese.littlefox.com/en which I wished I had discovered earlier. If I could go back in time, I think reading and listening to all the Level 3-5 Little Fox Chinese content before jumping into these books would have made the experience less painful. 3 months later... By mid December 2020, I had around 3,500 words in my Pleco deck. I decided to up my game and started a slightly more sophisticated children’s book series called 笑猫日记 by 杨红樱. It was a huge step up, due to the more mature writing style, less repetition of the same words, and the increase usage of chengyus. At the beginning of the series, I only managed to read one chapter a day (approx 2k characters), which took me around 30mins, before feeling completely drained. As I learnt more words and my literacy ability improved, it became less draining and occasionally I managed to read two chapters a day. I ended up reading 6 笑猫日记 books in 3 months. It also helped that I read from the same series for a long period of time as I got use to her writing style and many of the same words and chengyus were repeated throughout the series. Another 3 months later... By mid March 2021, I had around 5,300 words in my Pleco deck. Once again, I decided to up my game, and started an urban fantasy children’s series called 幻想大王 by 杨鹏. The added fantasy elements and longer paragraphs made this quite a step up from 笑猫日记. Exactly the same as with 笑猫日记, I was slow at the beginning then eventually I picked up my reading pace after a while. I read 4 books from the series before moving onto something else. 2 months later...I started to dip my toes in the adult webnovel world... By May 2021, I had in my deck around 6,300 words. I decided to give it a go at a relatively simple but long cultivation webnovel (total of 1.2mil characters) that I had discovered, 重生之极品皇子妃 by 叶忆落. Chapter lengths were around 1.5k at the beginning, then it increased to 3k after around chapter 70. This was a mistake, I should have waited a little longer and pick a shorter webnovel as I ended up spending 6 months on this. Luckily I did eventually got really fast at reading it, due to many repeated words and her simple writing style, else it might have dragged for longer than 6 months. At the same time, I did manage to also read two more children’s books called 我的狼妈妈 and 我的狐狸妹妹. I also read a few other short adult webnovels: 我男朋友好像有病,狐狸尾巴露出来了,当你走进图书馆而书里夹了一枚书签. 6 months later...I was fully in the webnovel world... By October 2021 I had in my deck around 8,000 words, and have been reading native novels for just over a year. I would say at this point, native content for adults started to become a bit more accessible. I also learnt how to navigate a few webnovel platforms to search for content. Today.... As for today, I have around 9,000 words in my deck and have read roughly 4million character worth of content. Read adult webnovels: 重生之极品皇子妃 by 叶忆落 你是不是喜欢我 by 吕天逸 我男朋友好像有病 by 一只大雁 狐狸尾巴露出来了 by 姜难吃 当你走进图书馆而书里夹了一枚书签 by 晚秋初十 微微一笑很倾城 by 顾漫 带着小卖部去古代 by 叶忆落 (dropped around 50%, might go back to this and finish it) 我家又不是神奇生物养殖场!by 唇亡齿寒0 做树真的好难 by 喝豆奶的狼 撒野 by 巫哲 幻想农场 by 西子绪 Read next: 镇魂 by priest (starting on Monday with some members of 看剧学汉语 Discord) Final Reflection My reading speed increased as time went on. As I didn’t take notes on my speed time over time, any improvement was based on feeling. One year after starting this reading journey was when I noticed a significant difference. I checked my reading speed recently while I was reading 幻想农场 by 西子绪, and found myself at around 200 characters per minute (so in 30mins, I can read around 6,000 characters). This is three times the speed from when I first started. The amount of time I can focus on a piece of text without feeling drained has also increased. Nowadays (18 months later), as long as that content doesn’t contain too many words I don’t know or complex sentence structure or grammar, I can read for as long as I want. I currently know around 2.8k characters, and at a level where I can comfortably read (with occasional help from a dictionary) some slice of life modern novels. Novels with a bit of fantasy or supernatural elements mixed in are also manageable. Anything heavy on certain themes such as ancient martial arts, high fantasy and sci-fi are still quite difficult. This is something I’m slowly working on right now. General FAQ Why have you only read webnovels? It’s simply ease of access, reading from a website allows me to use tools such as Zhongwen or Readibu. PayPal payment is also available on platforms like 起点中文网 and 晋江文学城. They are also extremely cheap. 幻想农场 by 西子绪 (a 700k character webnovel) is around $3-$4 to buy via 晋江文学城. 9k words doesn’t seem like it’s enough to read native content? That is simply just the number of words I have in my flashcard deck, many words are learnt from content and many are combination of characters I’m already familiar with. For example, I know 书店 and 网上, so I don’t necessary need 网上书店 in my deck. How do you determine which novel to pick up next? I based it on the total length and number of unique characters or recommendation from other learners. Usually I would give the first few chapters a try, if I really struggle then I put that on hold and try something else. Do you have any goals of the rest of 2022? Continue learning Chinese of course, I’m still far from being able to read everything without a dictionary. I don’t have a fixed ordered reading list as I decide base on my mood at the time but I would like to read 全球高考 by 木苏里 and 夺梦 by 非天夜翔 this year. Key take aways Patience & perseverance is key - The journey from 1k to 3k characters is a difficult and frustrating one, especially if you want to read Chinese literature. Not going to lie, I’ve wanted quit many times, but I’m so glad I pulled through, it was so worth it in the end. Don’t rush - It’s tempting to rush to the best work, but don’t do it, just take your time. For example, if I had attempted 幻想农场 2 years ago, or even a year ago, I would have been so frustrated with all the unknown words and the slow reading speed, that I might even have drop learning Chinese entirely, but instead I had an amazing experience! Take that first step - I know many learners find it difficult to pick up a completely brand new native novel that they’ve never read before in another language, but it honestly isn’t as scary as it seems. The difficult part is actually finding a suitable novel and taking that first step. The first few chapters might be a bit difficult but trust me it will get easier after a few chapters. If you’re looking for something to read, maybe give one of these a go: HSK (2.0) 4 - give 秃秃大王 a try HSK (2.0) 5 - 我的狼妈妈 or 我的狐狸妹妹 are good options HSK (2.0) 6 - 他们都说我遇到了未知生物 by 青色羽翼, 蜜汁炖鱿鱼 by 墨宝非宝 or 撒野 by 巫哲 would be good choices for this level For more recommendations check out our Webnovels and Books resource page. Some extra tips Listening is important - I know I haven’t really touched on listening in this post, but listening (whether it’s watching tv, listening to audiobook or a podcast) really really helps with passive vocabulary acquisition and retention. Use your vocabulary - Actively using vocabulary makes a huge difference in retention, so if you’re able to use what you learn from reading when speaking and writing then go for it. Conclusion Thank you for reading my ramble, I hope I’ve been able to inspire you, and you’ve learnt something from me post. All the best in your Mandarin Chinese learning journey. Remember, learning a new language enables you to discover all the culture has to offer, so go out there, discover and enjoy. I tried to keep the post short (still ended up quite long), so I didn't go into too much details. So please do ask questions, and if you want any more details on anything I'll be happy to provide it.
    3 points
  38. In regards to the use of the terminologies manhua and donghua instead of comic or anime/animation, we decided to use these words because that's what it's referred to in the growing oversea non-Chinese community. Both of these mediums are becoming increasing popular, you may or may not have noticed a few Chinese donghuas popping up on Netflix over the last 9 months. Oversea interest in manhua has been growing quite rapidly over the last few years, with Chinese publishers publishing translated manhua via a website and app especially made for the oversea audience. For example, Bilibili, a famous entertainment platform in China (some people call this the Chinese Youtube), released their oversea manhua platform early last year, and has already recieved 10mil downloads via Google App store. With increased awareness, comes increased interest in the language as some people want to read these in the original language. In our Discord community, we've noticed a huge increase in learners who are interested in these type of entertainment, they often join especially looking for manhua and donghua. These seems to be the right terminologies to use. I'm aware that leaves out the non manhua and donghua fans, but it's all about finding the right balance. Neither manhua or comic is entirely correct, they are both equally confusing. Like @alantin said in their post, "comic" doesn't convey the type of medium we're trying to present. Comic to many people often means Western style or really old style comics that are usually in printed format, where panels are designed for a printed book. Modern Chinese manhua (what the oversea audience is familiar with) are always digital, often coloured, often drawn and layed out specifically to be read on a phone/tablet and the art style is entirely different from Western comic. Labelling it comic might miscommunicate to users that it's a page of Western comic that has been translated to Chinese, but in fact it's a page of original Chinese manhua in digital form. Like you've all mentioned, labelling it manhua sparks confusion for those that are unfamiliar with this type of media. At the end of the day, who do we cater for? Those that are completely new to this form of media, or those that are already familiar with it? We decided to go for the latter. Those that are already familiar with this, are the ones most likely going to use that resource. You might then say "but you're not introducing those that are new, maybe they'll become interested", well if someone is particularly interested in finding out what it is, as others have already mentioned, there's always Google. In a way you can say it is deliberately targeting fans, but at the same time it's also a chance for someone new to learn the term used by the fan community. If they ever become interested, they'll find that the subreddits are r/Manhua and r/Donghua. Going to r/Comic or searching for "Chinese comic" on Reddit will lead them to an entirely different community. None of this is about the audience's level, but more about the type of audience and who will most likely click on those links. An advance learner who has been learning for years may never come across this word if this type of content isn't of any interest to them, but a beginner who barely knows pinyin would know manhua because it's something they already love (and maybe even have started Chinese because of their love for manhua). So to conclude, we won't change the terminologies used on the homepage right now. We do plan on having some sort of glossary as manhua and donghua are not the only new and unfamiliar terms. We also have some Chinese characters thrown in places, because we also want to teach learners the Chinese word and character for these type of media and genres. For example, telling someone "Here's a list of fantasy novels" isn't nearly as useful as "Here's a list of fantasy novels and the Chinese word and character for fantasy is 奇幻, and novels are called 小说". By learning the word 奇幻 and other terms, learners will be eventually learn enough words that the top navigation of a Chinese webnovel website isn't as scary anymore. We can't teach every word (as we're not here to teach Chinese like we said) but we can help out a little bit here and there. We noticed that not knowing what the Chinese word and characters for certain media and genre is a huge blocking point for learners from get into a Chinese website. I remember I couldn't navigation a Chinese webnovel platform till I learnt what all the genres were, and now that I've learnt them I know where to go to find webnovel of my favourite genre. In general, we try to use an English equivalent (alongside the Chinese word) when possible but that's not always the case. @alantin You should be able to change the filter, by clicking "Filter" on the right (next to the search bar). You can customise it how you like, it won't effect the view for other users.
    3 points
  39. Politeness, letting her save face. And what Amy says, avoiding a scenario where she scrambles to fix the problem you mentioned and then you still leave and everyone feels worse.
    3 points
  40. Hmm if you are not that close to her my guess is you can ask her 您最近怎麼樣?還好嗎?我看過您的朋友圈有一點擔心。See what she says, I guess there must be other people closer to her that have seen that moment as well. I personally would not report it to the platform if I don’t know the platform policy and her that well. I think a lot of companies don’t really care about the well being of the people using their platform and only care about themselves so it could make situation worse for her if she then get kicked off the platform or penalised. I know asking those questions above probably won’t be that much help if her problem is serious but sometimes when you are really down it helps a little to know someone noticed and care enough to ask.
    3 points
  41. You say you want to start using native Chinese material but can't be bothered to google/look up two words? For someone that says they are an Advanced Intermediate/Advanced learner, if you can't look at a Chinese site and find the word '第一章', that is on you. Again, that is something you need to work on and not take your angry out on someone just trying to provide resources for people who aren't afraid to read Chinese on a Chinese site. @MoonIvy I'm sorry you had to see such comments like that. From a lurker, your site is fine and your 'Comprehensive Reading Guide' is a great resources for people who want to start reading as soon as possible.
    3 points
  42. My mind went straight to this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jC2ZY2loo74 He even gets the tone right. 😁
    2 points
  43. Not quite the same as it's not as integrated, but my daughter cracks me up by describing e.g. her brother doing something naughty as, "弟弟,這是No! No! No!的行爲!"
    2 points
  44. Likely just a formality, but difficult to tell for certain. If they wanted to assess your Chinese level, they'd give you a test (or make a certain HSK level a requirement for admission). If it was me doing the application, I'd make the changes recommended by my friend as long as I understood them, but not bother with any fancy grammar patterns they want to put in which were completely new to me. I'd take the lack of response from the institution as a good indicator of the attention they'll pay to your application statement (although you're probably better off contacting them by phone than by email).
    2 points
  45. People in other cities had better stock up on food. If any cases occur, plan for severe restrictions.
    2 points
  46. Uighur-schmighur, what're you all goin'on about... The journalist's role is to report the doin's of the party in power, transmit to the people what the party in power requires of those same people, and ensure that those who are punished by the party in power are held up as an example of what was done wrong and thus why they were justifiably punished. If you were "disappeared," the journalist should be properly discreet about it until you re-appear properly contrite, whereupon the journalist should then helpfully point out your indiscretions. If you never reappear, the journalist should never, ever, amplify the complaints or questions of family members as to why you disappeared, and where you disappeared to. The party in power will, of course, keep child molesters, corrupt officials, criminal elements, etc., under control on your behalf, unless said miscreants are.... Well, that's probably better left unsaid by the journalist who wants to stay a journalist. Just makin' a nuisance of myself... TBZ
    2 points
  47. Yeah for sure, and I don't want them to loose face, so if I think you are a BBC, Im alot more unlikely start a convo of in Mandarin. I also think part of it is i utterly radiate love for all things China/ Chinese Culture/Language/History whatever . From my experience, and from what they have told me, I have had a few BBC's tell me that, as a result of bullying, and feeling like an outsider, they have often psychologically moved away from anything China related, and leant into being British. This is also a reason that if I think you are a BBC i probably may be very cautious about using Mandarin, or bringing China up. TBH this is why alot of my chinese friends are much older than me. I basically adore the generation that is 50 and above, particularly all my ayis. With this age group, i never have to hide my language ability or passion. Even if they hate Chinese politics (which i never bring up) they still love all the other aspects of their home country.
    2 points
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