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Showing most liked content since 07/17/2017 in all areas

  1. 21 likes
    Hi everyone, Finally, finally, finally!!! The long wait is over. I finally got my CSC admit notice today, at NUAA. Yes, it's really worth the wait. I am shaking with joy. As I have received such good news, I know there's great news for those who are still waiting. This calls for celebration......YAAYYY!!!
  2. 19 likes
    Hi everyone ! just received a good news from the embassy in my country this afternoon, my admission documents has reached their office ! I hope you will get a good news too !
  3. 16 likes
    Guys, I'm in. The embassy in my country has just been released the results today. Thanks God.
  4. 16 likes
    This, folks, is the quality of marketing at commonapp.cn.
  5. 13 likes
    I think my hair is gonna turn all white before the results finally come out...
  6. 13 likes
    Hi guys. God is faithful. My application was succesful. I was called by my embassy this afternoon though I dont know which university since I had chosen three. I am feeling very happy.
  7. 13 likes
    Hi guys! I received an email from the embassy in Bulgaria saying that I won the scholarship and I will study in Tsinghua! They will call me when they receive the documents from China. I applied for Bachelor’s degree in Software engineering + 1 preparatory year Chinese language. Just stay patient and hope for the best. I hope somebody else will join me in Tsinghua. Good luck to everyone!
  8. 11 likes
    I'm in! The long wait is over!! Looks like SJTU received CSC confirmation and started sending out Scholarship notices last night. super excited to be in Shanghai this fall!! Gotta admit I was feeling pretty glum last night waiting for these results but i sure feel relieved now! Like a lot of you, I had applied directly through the school and got nominated that way vs going thru the embassy. So, to everyone else waiting on Type B results, hang in there! You'll hear back from your schools soon
  9. 9 likes
    Hurrah! Hurrah! Hurrah! Got it! It's worth the wait.
  10. 9 likes
  11. 8 likes
    Thanks Roddy, you're very helpful. I'm glad I ran into this forum!
  12. 8 likes
    http://pl.china-embassy.org/pol/jy/t1480267.htm Embassy of China in Poland. Csc results.
  13. 8 likes
    I am a teacher at Zhangzhou Institute of Technology, China. My study focuses on Natural Language Processing. Based on this technology, in 2014 my team developed Smart Chinese Reader - a program to help people read and learn Chinese. Smart Chinese Reader has been updated through several versions and made great progress since then. The latest version is 3.2 whose advantages can be boiled down into two points: 1. Built-in web browser: Smart Chinese Reader offers a built-in web browser with popup Chinese dictionary on mouseover. Users can read any Chinese web pages easily now, simply hover mouse over a Chinese word to pull up its definition right on the page. I believe Smart Chinese Reader will let you know more about China, make foreigners' life and work easier in China. With the unique built-in web browser, you can search baidu.com for any Chinese information, browse qq.com for news, visit taobao.com or jd.com for shopping, 12306.com to buy railway tickets, 58.com to find local merchants and service providers, jiayuan.com or baihe.com or ylike.com to date Chinese boys/girls. 2. Deep reading: Users can select a section in a web page and study it in depth with more learning aids of Smart Chinese Reader, including segmented text, part of speech tagging, full-sentence translation, full-sentence pronunciation, example sentences, HSK ranking, and review. Smart Chinese Reader is also a great help for Chinese learning! In order to let more Chinese language learners use the program, for our original goal is to develop a popular Chinese language learning tool, we decide to publish Smart Chinese Reader 3.2 and the following versions as freeware. Please learn more about Smart Chinese Reader and download it from http://www.nlptool.com/. You can use it all the time for free. We are looking forward to hearing your feedbacks and suggestions!
  14. 7 likes
    Just received an email from 川大 saying my documents have arrived! The waiting game is finally over! Good luck to the rest of you that are still waiting for their documents. It's been nice having a platform of support.
  15. 7 likes
    I got the following email now: Dear Chinese Government Scholarship applicant, Tsinghua University received a formal announcement of Chinese Government Scholarship from the China Scholarship Council this morning. According to the announcement, your application for CGS through Tsinghua University has been approved by the CSC. Congratulations! We sincerely welcome you to Tsinghua University. Best regards, Graduate Scholarship and Grants Management Office-- 研究生院奖助管理办公室 Graduate Scholarship and Grants Management Office Tsinghua University
  16. 7 likes
    Good news. I got the scholarship. ISO just sent me an email. So I'll be going to Shanghai soon.
  17. 7 likes
    Rather than giving an English substitute, an actual explanation of the mechanics of the sentence would be helpful. Think of it this way perhaps: Verbs of the "give" variety will have the recipient and the object that is being transmitted to the recipient. 以 can be used to clearly mark the object that is being transmitted to the recipient. From your examples: 給[敵人]以[沈重打擊] "deal the enemy a heavy blow" In a literal translation into English, the 以 does not correspond to any overt word because we don't mark the object being transmitted with anything. In fact, only in the opposite English order does the "to" I think you found in your dictionary appear: "deal a heavy blow to the enemy". But the "to" in the English is clearly marking the recipient of the action, whereas the 以 is not. So tsk tsk on whoever put that entry in the dictionary. For 香港被許以高度的自治, you should note that this is the exact same thing happening, just now you have a passive added to the mix so the word order has shifted. If we shift it to the active voice we get something like: 許[香港]以[高度的自治] "permit/promise Hong Kong a high level of autonomy" If you are unsure how to get there, you will need to note that 被 plucks 香港 out and drags it to the front to make a passive construction.
  18. 7 likes
    I applied through the embassy in france. My name is in the recipient list on their website published 2 days ago. I have yet to receive an email or any info tho. Excited! edit: FYI for future candidates. I did not notarize anything, and applied for a master's degree completely unrelated to my current master's degree.
  19. 7 likes
    Hi there, I'm Sharon from Mauritius. First time applying for CIS and super excited to start studying at ECNU this September. About me: Started learning Mandarin in 2011. HSK 6, HSK Oral Advanced (2016). Bachelor degree in Chemical Engineering (Chinese taught) from Changzhou University. Won prizes at a couple of Chinese competitions for foreigners while in China. Took a gap year after my bachelor, working for a while (teaching Chinese, translation, interpretation and office work), reading some papers about TCSOL and trying to make up for not having studied BTCSOL. Preparing for MTCSOL after a BEng My application process for MTCSOL: East China Normal Uni in Shanghai Sun Yat Sen Uni in Guangzhou (SYSU definitely has better courses and feedback but still wanted to stay in Shanghai...) Clicked 'yes' for teacher's program. Didn't apply to my CI's partner university, 浙江理工, they don't offer MTCSOL anyway. In my application statement, I wrote I would like to be a Chinese teacher in Mauritius, but lack the foundation and training. However as local Mandarin teacher I'd have advantages over teachers from China. Late February: Initially tried to apply via the recently established CI (December 2016). I managed to get an appointment with the Chinese director, talked about my aspirations to teach Chinese, he was more than happy to recommend me. Early March:CIS application website got updated, new rules: CI needs to be >6 months old. My local CI was only 4 months old then. Do download the guidelines and read it carefully. So Plan B: HSK Center, aka Chinese Cultural Center (oldest one in the world). They never recommended students for CIS, and had no idea of how to undertake the procedures. I might as well be the first and blaze a trail for future applicants… CI director talked to them, got my recommendation letter even though I didn't take Chinese courses there. They put a stamp but somehow forgot to sign the letter, went back again to get the signature. April: HSK Center says they can’t recommend me because they can’t have access to the application website, they’ll contact Hanban and see how to solve this. 10th May: HSK Center tells me I have to change my recommending institution to Chinese Embassy but I can’t withdraw nor edit, no such function on CIS Website. I emailed Hanban and they say only Chinese Bridge winners can be recommended by the embassy anyway… Finally, HSK Center managed to confirm my recommendation online. 7th June: Interview with ECNU. MTCSOL Interview with ECNU 9th June: Pre-admitted to ECNU. Waiting for Hanban to confirm. 26th June: My application got pushed back to stage one. Because there should be the name of the person recommending me and not the name of Chinese Cultural Center displayed on my online application. Same situation as @Cheenchin and @yahya. So make sure there’s someone’s 姓名 in there. 28th June: Finally got my scholarship, downloaded my CIS award and forwarded it ECNU. Got my package including admission notice and Visa form 2 weeks later. ECNU Admission package Application for both Confucius Institute Scholarship and Chinese Government Scholarship I first applied for CGS via independent university program just before the deadline on 30th of March (chances via the local ministry of education/embassy are slim unless you've got connections...), still to ECNU but for a master in education, not MTCSOL and the status is still "submitted" to this day. So I didn't have to choose between the two scholarships, unlike @唐大卫 who got both but different courses at different schools (CIS:TCSOL at Shanghai U and CGS:general scholar in chinese language at ECNU) and then they automatically canceled the CIS. He said they did same thing with another girl from his college the previous year, so if you intend to apply both CIS and CGS, it would be safer for you to want CGS more than CIS. I first mailed my CGS documents to my brother who’s in Shanghai and he went on campus to submit my application. When he happened to ask if I had to pay the application fee a second time when I’ll apply for CIS a week later, she thought I was applying for MTCSOL both via CIS and CGS and rudely refused my CGS application despite my brother explaining it is two different courses. It seemed like she was exasperated that students apply for many scholarships and increase her workload, but hey it’s only fair for us to try to maximize our chances. Anyway, my brother left, got some lunch and came back, luckily another person was there and gladly took my CGS application. So better not mention that you’re applying for many scholarships, just be all smiles... Difficult to say how each of these weight on how they choose the final scholarship recipients, but that's what it's all about, trying to increase your chances and show them you're worth the money they'll be investing on you. End of story, or rather the beginning of a new exciting chapter in Shanghai! PS. To all future applicants, do prepare a hotpot full of perseverance and patience... Don’t be afraid to pester people but only when you have a genuine question, inform yourself well by reading the guidelines and by being resourceful with the search engine on this amazing forum… and finally best of luck,加油!
  20. 7 likes
    Was fortunate enough to find my name on the EU Window list. Man, now I have a tough decision to make
  21. 7 likes
    Confucius scholarship recipients list 2017 It's official! Looks like we'll be 23 students in ECNU to venture in MTCSOL. http://lxs.ecnu.edu.cn/msg.php?id=896 Campus From what @艾墨本 saw when he visited the campus a few days ago, the campus looked huge, almost like a nature park, with lots of greenery and modern buildings. The dorms #1 looked nice, although seems like we'll have common showers and kitchen. Apparently students can pay to upgrade to single room. Will see when I arrive on the 4th of September, registration starts on the 7th. Hopefully CIS students all get to stay at Dorm #1, right beside our faculty. Other than that, metro is super convenient and shopping outlets are widely available nearby. @sholeey Would be nice to meet some 学长学姐 too so we know what to expect and get to check out the curriculum and stuff. University Package I received my documents by DHL 2 weeks after confirming acceptance of the scholarship with ECNU (12 days processing and 3 days shipping to Mauritius). Admission Notice (English and Chinese) Visa form JW202 University booklet for international freshmen Academic calendar Campus Map Student insurance booklet
  22. 6 likes
    I'll make it easy for you. If you're reading and the only characters you don't recognise are the names of weird fruits and towns in Shandong then 5000 characters. If you don't then less than 5000.
  23. 6 likes
    Not really. Both are deeply flawed. Liu Zhao (劉釗), the director of the Fudan University's Center for Research on Chinese Excavated Classics and Paleography (復旦大學出土文獻與古文字研究中心) and one of the world's foremost experts on paleography, says that of the characters in the 說文解字 that we have paleographic data for, 80-90% of the explanations in the 說文 are problematic. There's a whole field of research devoted to correcting the errors in the Shuowen. But in this case, you're right that 牀 preceded 床. The original form of 床 was 爿. Later, 木 was added to create 牀. 牀 then corrupted into 疒+木 (easy to do since they resemble each other closely), which further corrupted into 床.
  24. 6 likes
    I'm in Taiwan for a few days and tonight visited the Ningxia Night Market 宁夏夜市 to enjoy a moveable feast. (Please excuse me for not being able to type the 繁体字 characters in this browser.) It's not one of Taipei's bigger and more famous markets, and it doesn't draw a lot of foreign visitors. But it had the appeal of being only a short walk from where I was staying. The night was not too hot, with only a little intermittent rain. Here's some of what I found during a couple hours of highly enjoyable grazing. First stop was this stand, where the grill lady/proprietor filled half seashells with chopped scallops and oysters, mixed with cheese and shredded vegetables, all topped with an oven-roasted breadcrumb dressing. You could have a small one for 40 TWD or a large one for 50. She dusted it to order with a spice mix according to your preference. I had it hot. She put it in a paper basket and gave me a plastic spoon. Wow, what a great blend of flavors. I became an instant fan. Since I live in Kunming, which is way inland, I'd been missing seafood and have made it a focus of my Taiwan eating experiences. I sampled several straight forward fresh seafood items tonight, as well as some exotics. You could have fish and shellfish grilled, deep fried, sauteed on a griddle, or cooked into a soup. I passed on the small oyster pancakes that are so popular here, because I had them in Taizhong less than 24 hours before. Next stop was for these interesting griddle-balls, which were made of a dough that was filled with mixed seafood and spices. They got browned on the outside as they cooked. It was one of the stands that I would have tried blind, without any idea of what they were selling, simply because the line was several times longer than of the other nearby stands. They lived up to their reputation, moist on the inside and with a crispy exterior. Mine were dusted with chili powder, though you could have had curry instead. Fresh fruit was everywhere, some sold as slices, some blended into juice according to your specs. I saw sugar cane and coconut and pineapple. Several vendors even had fresh durian for sale. I paused a long time at a place selling large deep-fried buns stuffed with seafood. My hunger had been sated, but my eyes were still talking to my mouth and making it water. I managed to hold off, though I really wanted to try one. Maybe next time. And then there was another place where I lingered and watched a long time, struggling valiantly, but finally succumbed to temptation. By now I was really wishing I had skipped the chicken wings. They were great tasting, but nothing truly unusual. What had me talking to myself here now was grilled baby squid that were mixed with a batter and fried in small molded balls. Not only had I never eaten any such item, I didn't even know they existed. I was intrigued by what they might have to offer. Could not ignore them. Four came in an order for 100 TWD. I knew that would be impossible, and I only wanted a taste. After some intense negotiation, I managed to buy only two pieces for 60 TWD, content to be paying a premium to cover the cost of the paper carton, skewers and plastic bag. They turned out to be pretty chewy and tough. Glad I had not bought four. This was the only dish the whole evening that did not meet or exceed my expectations. I now stumbled into a convenience store and bought a bottle of plain water. Sat down on a bench outside and washed my greasy hands, splashed water on my face in an effort to revive the nearly comatose gourmand. It worked well enough that after a while, I gathered a second wind and went back into battle. The two sides of the food alley were close enough together that the heat from the fires was now becoming oppressive. People were gently bumping each other with their umbrellas, albeit more tentatively and politely than if they had been scrimmaging on the Mainland. So now I walked along the outside of the food stalls where they offered some seating. This also let me see the actual walk-in restaurants which lined the street (Ningxia Street) and take a look at their slightly more formal offerings. Plenty of booths were completely out of the question for me at this stage in the game, but I still had to pause briefly for a look. This one had an assortment of delicious-looking sausage. This one next door to it featured large grilled mushrooms, each one the size of an ear of corn on the cob, brushed repeatedly with a spicy sauce as they cooked, and then sliced thin after cooking. These aren't the superbly savory wild mountain mushrooms of Yunnan, but they still looked pretty good. Time to go now. A bite of something sweet and that would surely do it. Just then I saw exactly what the doctor ordered, a stand selling two very small scoops of taro flavor ice cream, topped with some kind of shaved nut candy, freshly planed from the top of a large block, all wrapped in a crepe and folded into a bag like a cold desert burrito. I had never seen any such culinary invention in my threescore years and ten. Had to have one, even if I could only finish half of it. Well, that was quite an evening. Turned around and headed for home. Passed a block that was mostly given over to carnival-boardwalk-type games for children. One booth offered a chance for young kids to fish for small shrimp and minnows. The rain had stopped and I bought a plastic cup of freshly blended kiwi fruit, with a dash of local honey. Just tart enough to be interesting, but not so sour as to generate a pucker. Perfect for sipping on the road as I strolled back to the hotel and the vendor promised it would also aid digestion. Wish I knew more about how these treats were made. It impressed me that lots of them were original and inventive, not simply old standards rehashed. Such things as these night market snacks 夜市小吃 are not to be missed if you have a chance to visit this interesting Chinese island.
  25. 6 likes
    @MC2 the government is cracking down on VPNs, this is true-- but more so for Chinese netizens. It would be ludicrous for them to shut down all VPNs in the country because they are imperative. I just graduated from NYU, and we have a degree-granting college in Shanghai. This university is a dual venture between NYU (an American university) and the Chinese government. When I attended, everything needed to be sourced through a VPN. That will not change anytime soon. All the platforms that NYU uses, if it had no access to a VPN, would be blocked. Every single portal, from the student page to access classes, to email, and even our online libraries are all blocked by the Great firewall. In addition, as a private university (in the states) you literally cannot access anything if you are away from the main campus (which in NYC) without a VPN. The same for foreign companies, operating in China. Google for example, does not actually work in China. (Cause, they wouldn't pander to the Chinese government's requests) However, they do have offices in the bottle opener building in Shanghai, where they do actual work--they could not operate without a VPN. This is not to say that the government will not purposely throttle VPNs. On days of extreme importance, all VPNs will be down, such as last fall when the G20 summit was in China. No VPNs (whether foreign or within china) worked for days. So right now, you cannot download a VPN in China-- unless you are within a VPN network (which in my case was my semi-foreign university, but most of the universities we will all be attending are public ones, and completely sanctioned by the Chinese government). Which is why I'm saying you need to make sure that you have a vpn downloaded and working on your tech. If not, fly or take a ferry to Hong Kong or Macau (if your country of origin allows you to go visa-free) and get a working VPN before you actually enter the mainland. This is also why I said you should pay for your VPN--ExpressVPN has pledged not to be intimidated by the Chinese government, and even though Apple is currently in compliance with the Chinese government and has removed the ability to buy a VPN/download one on its mainland China store, if you have it on your tech, it will work. This rule also applies to most good VPNs. Every few years the Chinese government promises to crack down on VPNs, and they never completely do. So don't worry. They only target the cheap and terrible ones.@Kambili don't go with a tourist visa, there is no way to change that visa unless you physically return to your home country. Rather, you would have to go to Hong Kong every 60?or 90? days in order to renew the tourist visa. And when you're in China, you need to apply for a permanent residence card within 30 days of arrival if you intend on staying there for longer than 6 months-- and you cannot do that on a tourist visa. @Nhq0117 I would highly recommend that you bring your health form with you, if the embassy told you to. (Mine did as well) because again, you may not need it for the X1 or X2, (I didn't last year for my X1), but you will need it for your permanent residence application, if you don't want to go through all the hassle all over again.
  26. 6 likes
    Guys following are the CSC type B results announced so far... http://studyheu.hrbeu.edu.cn/en/ShowArticle.asp?ArticleID=1250 http://ieec.cust.edu.cn/en/notice/detail?cid=115&pid=109&detail=25 http://iec.cug.edu.cn/cglxen/show/1308.aspx http://www.tju.edu.cn/sie/xwdt/zyxw/201707/t20170731_297387.htm http://isc.ustb.edu.cn/en/news.jsp?id=203
  27. 6 likes
    @The Humble Worker I glanced through the link you sent, and I think you are automatically disqualified by the following section: Approximate translation as follows (I cannot vouch for complete accuracy and will gladly accept any corrections): I did not translate, but would also like to include lines (8) through (11) there, because it includes references to "family... and people who have influence on [the person, aka you]". Basically the fact that your immediate family are Swedish, and voluntarily left China to go to Sweden and give up their Chinese citizenship in favor of Swedish citizenship pretty much automatically disqualifies you from joining the PLA. If China and Sweden were to end up on opposite sides of a dispute, your loyalties would be suspect due to your immediate family being Swedish citizens. Furthermore, based on the line translated above, you, yourself are suspect, because you have what is termed as a "complicated background". The chances of the PLA ever recruiting you is pretty much nil, because they have more than enough volunteers from Chinese citizens who do not have a complicated background. For China, they would trust somebody born and raised in China as a Chinese citizen more than somebody who isn't, and the fact that you were born and raised in Sweden automatically makes you suspect. I would strongly suggest that you find other ways to show your love for China. Learning Mandarin and improving your Cantonese would be a good start. Definitely go on exchange or at least spend a year (or longer) in China. Visit your Chinese relatives as much as you can, and certainly communicate more with them.
  28. 6 likes
    Hard to believe that a foreign government is willing to fund 4 years of my studies just like that. They gave me everything I asked for. I'll work hard and keep in mind this favor done to me. I'm going to Yunnan.
  29. 6 likes
    These are not the best indicators, though. Better indicators of a socialist culture would be the level of inequality, the level of services provided equally to every member of the society (e.g. health care, education, public libraries, public spaces, etc.), the amount of legislation designed to protect the general public from factories and corporations, the amount of control workers have over their workplaces, and ultimately, how much regular people care about their neighbours. Only by looking at these things can you decide whether a country is more or less socialist than another country.
  30. 6 likes
    @The Humble WorkerYou might find Sweden a lot more Socialist than China. In fact, China is probably the least socialist place on this planet. They are currently in the process of removing poor people from Beijing to make more space for the richer locals and apartment owning class. If you want socialism and a government that cares about poor people, Sweden might be the better place (though the food is definitely much better here).
  31. 6 likes
    http://cl.china-embassy.org/esp/gdxw/t1479769.htm Embassy of China in Chile. CSC Results. So happy I got it
  32. 6 likes
    EU Window scholarship results are out: http://www.chinamission.be/eng/zglx/t1479020.htm Congratulations to all of those that got the scholarship!
  33. 5 likes
    Starting a thread for all things vegan. For reference, it means no meat (that does include fish (not a plant), poultry and seafood), dairy, eggs and honey, and other animal byproducts in the diet. It also affects other areas of life, so for example no leather shoes, or woolen socks. There can be many reasons why one would choose to live such a life. The effects meat industry has on our planet, health, religion, ethical reasons,...For me personally, it's 'do not hurt'. I'm hoping we could use this thread for discussion and advice. I'm moving to China this year and am looking for some advice. As far as I understand, regular restaurants don't provide actual vegan options, as the vegetables are likely to be cooked in some sort of meat broth. The university canteens are also unlikely to make separate vegan dishes. Now, I actually come from a country that is really big on meat, dairy and the like, so this situation is not new for me. What I'm really looking forward to is meal prep and cooking. But I have so many questions. I see China really likes tofu and soy milk. Is every type vegan or do I need to be careful of some? Any good recipes? What about sauces, which ones are vegan-friendly? Breads and noodles? Also are shoes and sneakers without leather easy to find? In my home country when I ask for zero leather people look at me like I'm crazy These are just some of the questions of the top of my head. I really hope more people will join and we can share tips and tricks, recipes and restaurants and everything else~
  34. 5 likes
    This is a newish and somewhat worrying trend. Examples... CUCAS - these look to be university scholarships. $10 non-refundable application fee, $400 if you're successful. This new site, commonapp.cn. This page is aimed at overseas agencies. Make sense of this, if you can: That reads to me as a claim that scholarships aren't being awarded on merit, but on who you apply through. What the financial arrangements are I don't know, but their overseas partners look to be commercial agencies rather than universities. That means two intermediaries between the applicant and the school. Couple of years back, this, with SICAS and the Jasmine Scholarship. I have various thoughts about this. These are general and don't apply to any of these companies in particular. Existing application systems are opaque and confusing. Imagine being a non-native English speaker, who's trying to do this in a couple of hours of Internet cafe time every week. It's no great surprise if middle-men making the process easier spring up. There's a lot of scope for graft. Student pays $500 application fee to agent. Agent pays $200 to school. School recommends student for scholarship and ignores pile of other applications. This would surprise me not at all. There's a lot of potential for bait and switch. Draw folk in with promised scholarships - sorry, you weren't successful. Now we have all your details, you could go to .... for $xxx a year. Oh, sorry, you didn't get the full scholarship, but there's a partial one, at a rate the university still makes a profit on, and the course is half-empty anyway... Anyone who wants to email me a scholarship application with a non-refundable application fee is welcome. However, in that situation, what motivation do I have to tell you a) that your application isn't up to scratch, b) that there are 2,000 applicants for 2 places and c) submit the application anywhere. Some of the university scholarships look more like first-year discounts. How much effort is being made to inform students if scholarships for the following years are less, fewer or harder to get? Note the T&C's on the CUCAS university scholarship example above: "In the following years if you have great academic performance, you can apply in the University for other Scholarships." Ultimately it is the student's responsibility to consider future funding, but are they getting clear answers if they ask about it? From the student's point of view, this could still be a massive bargain. A few hundred dollars for a full scholarship? For all its failings, if you're in a developing nation with a weak education system, the Chinese education system can be a beacon of hope. However, what about the folk without the few hundred dollars to pay up front? While my focus here was on commercial firms, things can get sketchy without their involvement - this from the 2016 CSC round, indicated places were being ear-marked for students from a particular university. I'm not sure if this is actually happening, but it might be - university has a scholarship quota, but can't find the students to use it (not inconceivable for a no-name university with an unpopular course). Agent pushes students towards it, university pays commission out of scholarship income. Experiences and thoughts welcome.
  35. 5 likes
    Lotus root 莲藕 and corn 玉米 are a winning team, often paired in hearty winter soups. The flavors go so well together that last night I combined them in a 凉拌 or big hearty salad, just right for a hot weather meal. Here's how I made it in case you'd like to try it at home. Lotus root is one of those things that isn't quite accurately named. Instead of truly being a root, it's actually part of the segmented stalk of an unusual underwater rhizome. Grown mostly in the south part of China, as well as in Vietnam, India, Korea and Japan, it's a plant which loves sunshine. The paddies where it flourishes are initially filled with large, vivid flowers, parts of which are also edible. The flowers have acquired a good deal of significance in several religious and philosophical traditions. Here's how lotus roots are grown and what they look like when freshly harvested. Being a lotus farmer is challenging work. The ones I buy in my neighborhood wet market are grown near Yiliang 宜良,to the east of Kunming, not far from Stone Forest 石林。The young man and his wife who operate the stand sell them alongside bamboo shoots, from hills in that same area. They are a friendly and helpful couple, enthusiastic about their wares, and the wife always quizzes me carefully as to the intended use of my purchase. First time this happened I wasn't sure what to think and kind of drew a blank. So she prompted me by asking, "For salad, for soup, or for a stir fry?" Then the light bulb went on and I could answer. She selects the appropriate specimens with your culinary goal in mind; pretty darned helpful when you come to think of it. When I got them home, I scrubbed them clean under cool running water. Then sliced off the hard surface with a sharp vegetable peeler. She has picked me nice pieces, the ends of which are still closed. Pieces that are broken or already cut in half sometimes have traces of sand and mud inside that is very difficult to remove and makes them slightly gritty. Mine were pristine. Note that these two segments are not terribly big around, they are young sections and thus have a milder flavor than some of the bigger, more mature ones. The latter are great for soups and stews, but these are perfect for salads. They are crunchy and mildly sweet, while being slightly starchy. This is an item that plays well with others; doesn't insist on always dominating or being the center of attention. Slice it thin and put the slices directly into acidified water. I used a splash of white vinegar, but lemon juice is also fine. If you don't do this and just leave it exposed to air after cutting, it turns brown and ugly; never gets white again regardless of how hard you might scrub it. Let these slices soak while you get the other ingredients ready. I cut a cob of fresh corn into thin rounds. This makes them easier to pick up later with chopsticks at the table. Boil them for about two minutes in lightly salted water. I planed down a carrot 胡萝卜 with a vegetable peeler, though you could just as well do it with a knife. Sliced a large scallion 大葱, and a single hot pepper 辣椒, removing most of the seeds. If you like more fire, leave them in. Washed and chopped some cilantro 香草。 At this point I like to make the dressing. I used one with dark vinegar 老陈醋 for the mixed vegetables and another one for the lotus root slices with white vinegar 白醋 so as not to discolor them. In each case it was just a tablespoon of vinegar, a tablespoon of light soy sauce 生抽 and a tablespoon of sesame oil 香油。Salt and a pinch of sugar; add MSG 味精 if you like. (Most Chinese do.) Drop the lotus into boiling water (I used the same salted water in which I boiled the corn) and let it blanch for about a minute. If you cook it too long it becomes mushy and uninteresting. Plunge it immediately into ice water to cool it fast; this keeps it nice and crisp. Sauce the lotus and the other vegetables separately in two containers and put them into the fridge for about 30 minutes. Keeping them apart like this isn't essential, but it makes the finished product have more eye appeal. Very white lotus and colorful vegetables contrast nicely with each other when plated side by side. When you are ready to eat, build your big dinner salad and put it on the table. It's a tasty and healthy one-dish summer meal, easily supplemented as desired. I ate mine with French bread and Emmental cheese plus a glass of chilled Spanish white wine.
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    I got my Jw201 package today. I got accepted to Dongbei University of Finance and Economics but I'll be doing a year of language at University of International Business and Finance in Beijing
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    Chineasy is not worth buying unless you like the pictures. Victor Mair has written two articles talking about why. I'm biased, but I recommend my company's Chinese character dictionary for Pleco. It's not finished yet, but since you're a beginner it will have enough to keep you busy for a while. Our dictionary explains exactly what each component (not radical!) is doing in each character, so you get a clear idea of how the character is structured, which allows you to see the real connections between other characters. It also integrates nicely with Pleco's flashcard module. If you prefer paper books, Harbaugh's Chinese Characters: A Genealogy and Dictionary is decent, but there are a lot of inaccuracies.
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    Hi guys, I just wanted to update here for others references. I applied for 2 years Chinese language programme at Ocean university of China, I just received my admission letter and in the letter it is written that I'm enrolled in a 1 year Chinese language programme. I did manage to get a pre-admission letter of 2 years Chinese language programme though. So most probably it was CGS who change my study duration or it was the university that decide the study duration although I have talked to the embassy to extend my study duration and they sent the 2 years pre-admission letter to CSC. Also, I deliberately insert my study duration on CSC website for 1 year and not 2 years since at that time. I thought of wanted to play it safe. I really wish I could get the 2 years Chinese language programme but I believe at this moment that's best for me. I've seen one previous year applicants that applied for 2 years Chinese language programme at Anshan Normal University and also someone told me last year there are EU window applicants that is also successfully enrolled in 2 years Chinese language programme. Nonetheless, just having the opportunity to go and study in China with everything being covered, I'm eternally gratefully for this. Good luck and congrats for those who've heard the good news ! Be prepared to have an amazing journey in China !
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    Today I received this email, but no news from the embassy yet.
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    Well I guess it's pretty clear now that the chances of an overseas Chinese joining the PLA are pretty low, and I just have to accept it I guess. Thanks for the help everyone, I think I'll start planning a different path of my life, because a policy change that would allow me to join doesn't seem very likely to happen. But if it does happen, let me know!
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    Hi guys. God is faithful. My MOFCOM application was succesful. I was called by my embassy this afternoon though I dont know which university since I had chosen three. I am feeling very happy. For those who applied thru the embassy u can the embassy for confirmation
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    So July ends tomorrow and most of us are still waiting. I hope August comes with some good news.
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    In some cases (developing countries, I think), airfare is covered.
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    It's not a practical option. These are your main obstacles: 1) There might be a theoretical route to citizenship, in that there's a law on the books which allows for it. But that doesn't mean the guy on the desk at the embassy has heard of it, or that they've put procedures in place for dealing with applicants. In the best part of a decade and a half we've seen a few queries like this and I don't recall a single successful case - and if there were any, I think they'd be quite easy to find, as the China Daily loves a 'foreigner makes home in China' story very much indeed. Have a look and see if you can find anyone else in a similar situation who's done it. Bear in mind you're giving up all other passports. 2) Does the PLA want you? I'm not aware of a recruitment crisis. Why is the recruitment guy going to want to put one Swedish-born kid who's only held a passport for a year in instead of yet another village kid. 3) Even if you get in (you won't) you are never going to be an average soldier. You will, forever and ever, be the foreign recruit. You will be seen as politically suspect, you will not get any real responsibility, and you will spend a surprising amount of time featuring in China Daily 'foreigner makes home in China' stories. Take some of the above advice. Hold on to your current passport, build links with China - study there, holiday there, live there, marry there - and figure out some non-military career options.
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    Just got a contact from my contact at the IIE in NYC. My third choice, Fudan University accepted me!
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    Just a quick note to say that Jon contacted us beforehand, and worked with us to make sure his post would meet our guidelines for commercial posters. I know more than a few members are averse to advertising posts, and if that's you, feel free to skip this thread otherwise, please keep discussion related to the content and services Chinese Zero to Hero provides.
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    I suspect there's also scope for more... sympathy? understanding?... for the students concerned. We look at it from the point of view of people who've voluntarily gone to China because they like the idea. There may be career reasons, but none of us (none of us in the first world, at least) are likely to have been told that their education options at home have run out and their best chance of future success is China. If I'd been in my late teens or early twenties and had to travel to Vladivostok to take a degree taught in Russian, I suspect I might have done the bare minimum too. Yes, it'd have been a waste, but the problem isn't so much the behaviour of the students as the fact they've got to travel overseas to a country they have little interest in for the sake of a degree. Presumably as higher education in China expands and improves the numbers travelling overseas will fall off, although who knows on what timescale...
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    I recently bought these off an online second hand app, something called Shpock, I was intrigued by the pictures and they were very affordable, so i bought them. Once I had received them I did some research and found that they are made by a company called Uncle Goose. Their website was an eye opener, they do these blocks for all sorts of things, the Periodic Table, The Planets, many languages including Greek, Hebrew, Korean and more. I am guessing they are designed for children but they are very nicely made, well carved and painted, they are solid wood and quite weighty but not too heavy. I thought they were fun and practical. I remember these as ABC blocks when I was a child but never realised how they had expanded into this many varieties. Here is the website https://unclegoose.com/products/
  49. 4 likes
    I'm so glad I got it, this is a lifetime opportunity
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    Agree with @Minotaur -- I mostly see vegetable oil in use here in Kunming. Lard is sometimes used in baking (as is butter.) There is an issue with what is called "gutter oil" 地沟油 in some cheap cafes. They buy it from unscrupulous vendors who recycle waste oil that can contain most anything. I'm not vegan (or vegetarian,) but if I were, it would make me want to cook most of my meals at home where I could keep an eye on what goes into each dish. We have several Buddhist temples and monasteries here (in Kunming.) Two of them that I'm aware of serve lunch to visitors. If I were trying to learn more about what to eat and what to avoid, while following vegan precepts, I would try to make friends with some of those cooks. I'll bet they have plenty of practical advice; tips that are difficult to find in books or on the internet.