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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 06/17/2018 in all areas

  1. 2 points
    Not a 文言 expert at all, but perhaps a greater range of expressive particles (哉/兮/乎) and fewer 也 would sound better to me - it's a little bit too declarative. Nice use of 九天. I think you definitely need some kind of parallelism for line 4/5. I spot a 裏, which strikes me as distinctly non-文言 濠 is better than 壕 for "moat". 其杜賊之嫉 not sure about this line; I actually wasn't aware of 杜絕 as a modern Mandarin verb. But my main issue is that I actually don't think this is the sentiment that Shakespeare is expressing. 賊 I've always thought of as thief, but not "lesser countries"; do you have a source for that? I'm wracking my brain for what the 五書 calls them. In any case, I appreciate you're going for a prose translation, and maybe my appreciation of drama in Classical Chinese is extremely poor (the traditions of East Asia and Greco-Romano-Europe are very distinct in their evolution of the music/verse/drama relationship), but I feel like this is begging for some kind of constrained writing that can respect the very strong rhythm of the original English.
  2. 2 points
    Don't forget 三点钟 is also an option. Not rare or antique.
  3. 2 points
    These 2 articles by Grace Yang in the China Law Blog may be helpful reading before signing a contract: China Expat Employment Contracts: The 101 (February 2018) https://www.chinalawblog.com/2018/02/china-expat-employment-contracts-the-101.html China Expat Employment Contracts Because They Matter. A Lot. (June 2018) https://www.chinalawblog.com/2018/06/china-expat-employment-contracts-because-they-matter-a-lot.html
  4. 2 points
    Quick google brings up online viewing. http://tv.cntv.cn/videoset/C10642 You need Flash, though.
  5. 1 point
    I thought I'd go for a different feel: This royal throne of kings, this sceptred isle, This earth of majesty, this seat of Mars, This other Eden, demi-paradise, This fortress built by Nature for herself Against infection and the hand of war, This happy breed of men, this little world, This precious stone set in the silver sea, Which serves it in the office of a wall Or as a moat defensive to a house, Against the envy of less happier lands,-- This blessed plot, this earth, this realm, this England. 王位瑞島 大地熒座 異園半神 社自造堡 避疫亂而作 小域有樂人 寶鑲於銀海 海事域為壁 或像宅之洫 貪國征所衛 福土哉地域哉 英國之所在 I'm aware that this is complete doggerel.
  6. 1 point
    Since 澄 and 清 both mean "clear or transparent" and 澄清 is a verb, the basic meaning is the same no matter how it is pronounced, which is "to make it clear; to remove other substances". However, when it is used in different contexts, the pronunciation also changes. When it is chéng qīng, it means "to clarify the truth or to clear the air in order to prevent misunderstanding". When it is dèng qīng, it means "to purify or to remove unneeded substances." Alright as you may have noticed, the former is usually used for abstract concepts like an incidence, a misunderstanding or a situation. While the latter is usually used for things that physically exist, and this is not a frequently-encountered usage.
  7. 1 point
    Hi everyone, Got four questions that I wondered if anyone had a good answer to, all about 家. The first is: why is 家 the measure word for shops / restaurants etc? Is it simply because they were traditionally family run? Or is it more because 家 implies somewhere where there are a number of people in a building together? The second is: why is 家 not the measure word for things like schools or museums? Is it because, as I suggested above, this classified is for things that were traditionally family run? The third is: am I right in think that you would normally use 家 for supermarkets but 个 for markets? If so, why do you think that is? Does there need to be some sort of building present for us to be able to use 家? The fourth is: when it's just on its own - so without 庭 or 人 being added to it - would you say its basic meaning is more "home" or "family"? It's an interesting word, so I would be very interested in learning more. Christa
  8. 1 point
    I don´t know if this is too much to ask for, but I´m looking for daily international news, with simplified subtitles. Does this thing exist anywhere? I am looking specifically for subtitles and not a transcript, as I find the subtitles more engaging. Something interesting I have found is 《华人世界》 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UNjUhlryWK0&t=1099s it has daily episodes I believe on CCTV, it's news about Chinese people over the world. It has subtitles. This is the closest I've found to what I am looking for, but still not exactly what I am looking for, I am not looking for news about China/Chinese people. Anyone has found anything like this? Is this a lost case?
  9. 1 point
    For your fourth question, I suggest this short documentary. Not because it will answer your question directly, but because it will make it even more complicated 😁
  10. 1 point
    The website: http://www.unmultimedia.org/radio/chinese/ has an extensive archive of thousands of news articles and magazines in Chinese (as well as all other UN languages). Each article includes a word for word transcript and audio read by different reporters. Many of the magazine articles are 10 minutes and over of dialogue along with accurate transcripts. It's all free and extremely beneficial to students in the intermediate-advanced levels!
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