Learn Chinese in China

Featured

  1. abcdefg

    abcdefg

    Members


    • Likes

      108

    • Content count

      4,551


  2. imron

    imron

    Administrators


    • Likes

      70

    • Content count

      11,313


  3. Jellyfish

    Jellyfish

    Members


    • Likes

      48

    • Content count

      73


  4. 艾墨本

    艾墨本

    Members


    • Likes

      46

    • Content count

      286



Popular Content

Showing most liked content since 04/25/2017 in all areas

  1. 9 likes
    I realized a few minutes ago that we didn't have an index or guide to articles about tea and tea culture on Chinese Forums. Thought it might be helpful to pull them all together in one place as a reference, especially for people who have recently joined. Be glad to try my best to add to them as we go along; so if you think something is missing, or there is something else tea-related that you would like to see, please let me know. 1. General introduction to Chinese tea and tea tools -- https://www.chinese-forums.com/forums/topic/48538-chinese-tea-%E4%B8%AD%E5%9B%BD%E8%8C%B6/ 2. Yunnan red tea -- https://www.chinese-forums.com/forums/topic/48661-dian-hong-%E6%BB%87%E7%BA%A2%E8%8C%B6-yunnans-simplest-tea/ 3. Brewing green tea, especially Biluochun -- https://www.chinese-forums.com/forums/topic/48541-how-to-make-green-tea-that-isnt-bitter/ 4. Chinese flower tea, chrysanthemum, etc. -- https://www.chinese-forums.com/forums/topic/52972-a-little-about-chinese-flower-tea-%E8%8A%B1%E8%8C%B6/ 5. White peony tea -- https://www.chinese-forums.com/forums/topic/53980-spring-tea-has-arrived-a-look-at-yunnan-bai-mudan-%E4%BA%91%E5%8D%97%E7%99%BD%E7%89%A1%E4%B8%B9/ 6. Maofeng green tea -- https://www.chinese-forums.com/forums/topic/51305-springtime-in-a-glass-yunnan-maofeng-tea-%E4%BA%91%E5%8D%97%E6%AF%9B%E5%B3%B0%E8%8C%B6/ 7. Taiwan Oolong -- https://www.chinese-forums.com/forums/topic/49780-a-taste-of-taiwan-oolong/ 8. Pu’er tea -- https://www.chinese-forums.com/forums/topic/48844-warming-up-to-pu%E2%80%99er-a-beginner%E2%80%99s-guide-%E6%99%AE%E6%B4%B1%E8%8C%B6/ 9. What to do with old green tea -- https://www.chinese-forums.com/forums/topic/52708-last-years-tea/ 10. Herbal iced tea cubes -- https://www.chinese-forums.com/forums/topic/52126-tea-recipe-herbal-t-cubes/ 11. About buying a tea set -- https://www.chinese-forums.com/forums/topic/49840-about-buying-a-tea-set-and-what-does-it-say/ 12. The famous tea mountains of south Yunnan -- https://www.chinese-forums.com/forums/topic/48134-south-yunnan-tea-mountains/ 13. Visiting Yunnan tea plantations -- https://www.chinese-forums.com/forums/topic/40013-learn-about-chinese-tea-and-see-plantations-in-yunnan-where-can-we-start/ 14. History of tea podcasts -- https://www.chinese-forums.com/forums/topic/49617-laszlo-montgomery-on-the-history-of-chinese-tea-%E2%80%93-a-listening-guide/ 15. Handwritten tea label -- https://www.chinese-forums.com/forums/topic/44897-handwritten-tea-label/ 16. Tea eggs -- https://www.chinese-forums.com/forums/topic/53701-tea-eggs-yunnan-style-%E8%8C%B6%E5%8F%B6%E8%9B%8B/ 17. Casual tea survey a long time ago -- https://www.chinese-forums.com/forums/topic/14934-favorite-chinese-teas6 18. Xihu Longjing -- https://www.chinese-forums.com/forums/topic/54141-西湖龙井茶-west-lake-dragon-well-tea/#comment-415472 Just to be clear about it, I wanted to emphasize that this is not my private turf by any means. Others have already contributed fine articles, and everyone is welcome to pitch in with their own contributions. (Ahem... @Alex_Hart, as 杭州人, 龙井 Longjing has your name on it.)
  2. 8 likes
    I've enjoyed this delicious side dish for several years, but have only recently begun making it at home. That might have been a big "waistline mistake" because it isn't low calorie and it is definitely addictive. But I'll show you how it's done nonetheless and let you wrestle with the weighty moral implications on your own dime. It's a strange fact of Yunnan life that we call potatoes 洋芋 ("foreign tuber") instead of 土豆 ("earth bean") like most of China. People with 3-wheeled bicycle carts 三轮车 drive slowly by my old housing complex two or three times a week shouting "买洋芋", emphasizing the rising second tone of the 样, the hard downward fourth tone of the 芋 and the scooped-out third of 买 until it sounds like a type of regional music. Hard to resist getting some at the bargain rate of only 3 Yuan per kilo, especially when delivered to my door. Scrub and peel two medium sized ones. And now you have a prime chance to practice your 刀法,to polish up your knife skills. Young Chinese chefs spend days upon days doing things like making accordion cuts in cucumbers that allow them to be stretched to three feet without breaking. Accomplished master chefs can do things like boning a small snake blindfolded at high speed without any of the tiny bones winding up in the meat. You want the match-stick slivers to be fairly uniform in size. Doing this with a sharp knife 菜刀 works better from a texture 口感 standpoint than using a grater. It also makes the potatoes less likely to dry out with cooking. Adopt a mindful zen-type focus and visualize yourself as a human Cuisinart or Robot-coupe machine. Suspend all considerations of time and don't be in a hurry. Don't rinse the sliced potatoes because that would remove some of their natural amylose and make them less adherent; it would make them stick together less well. Sprinkle in a large teaspoon of flour; mix well with your chopsitcks, breaking up any clumps. Thinly slice a small segment of red bell pepper 红椒 and scallion 大葱,using only the white part of the latter. Set them aside to use later 备用 as a raw fresh garnish. Actually, I prefer to prepare these before starting the potato. If cut potato stands too long, it can discolor. And now you have a chance to test your trusty iron wok, to see if it has been well cured and find out whether its carefully-acquired patina will provide non-stick cooking for about 10 minutes. Bring the wok up to about three fourths of its maximum heat (tested with a drop of water) and add a bit more oil than you would normally use for a vegetable stir fry. The recipes I've read all say that a flat bottom fry pan 平底锅 actually works better, but I don't have one. Add the slivered potatoes 土豆丝 and stir them around quickly with chopsticks 筷子 to distribute them evenly. Smooth them out with your spatula 锅铲。Now shake on another teaspoon or two of oil onto the surface; it will soak right through. I use sesame oil for that 香油。 Now turn the heat to medium-low and don't disturb them until they set, one or two minutes. Then I press them down with my spatula to be sure there are no thick spots or bubbles, at which point I cover them with a pot lid that is slightly smaller than the wok. Shake the wok from time to time to slide the pancake around inside while three or four long minutes tick by. Use your chopsticks and a corner of the spatula to gently lift an edge to peek and see if the underside is nicely browned 金黄。If so, you are ready to turn the whole works over. If you are supremely confident, you can toss it in the air as though you were on TV. I usually opt for flipping it with the aid of two spatulas or a plate. It's the conservative approach, and as such flirts less with disaster, albeit sacrificing a degree of flair. Continue cooking the other side another 5 minutes or so on low. When the whole thing is done, turn it out onto a large plate and dust it with dried red pepper flakes 干辣椒, Sichuan prickly ash 花椒粉,and salt 食盐。I like to do that with my fingers so as not to get too much. Garnish the finished product with the bell pepper and scallion. Serve it with a smile. You can consider it a success if the outside is crisp and golden while the inside is still white and tender 脆嫩。If you are eating this fine dish communally, Chinese-style, you tear off a bite-sized piece of the cake with your chopsticks, trying to include a sliver or two of the red pepper and scallion. This is Chinese food, Yunnan style, that you can make in the West without any rare or hard to find ingredients. By all means give it a try, but don't say I didn't warn you about it being habit forming.
  3. 8 likes
    Hi guys, I am the recipient of the CIS scholarship in 2014. I actually have shared bout this HSK level and score in my 2014 post. So let me brief about this issue again. I apply CIS for a one year language program in 2014. At first I thought that by submitting a higher level of HSK will secure a place for the scholarship, but I was totally wrong. I apply for the one year program with a HSK6 and a HSKK. I am so happy that I received the scholarship, but few days after the result, my status changed to rejected. The reason is that I am overqualified for the program as the objective of the one year program is to obtain a HSK5 at the end of your study. But I am so lucky that the Confucius Institute in my country willing to help me with the issue and they recommended me for the MTCSOL program. So 2014, instead of receiving a 1 year program, I was awarded for the MTCSOL program and I graduated my Master's Degree last year. I wish best of luck to everyone applying for this year.
  4. 7 likes
    Dear Forumistas, I thought this could be a thread where we share our kitchen equipment—or whole kitchens for that sake—and the stories behind, or our new purchases. Since I started a few threthreadsads, asking you a lot, ant gathering many answers and getting a lot of help, I will go first. My friend arrived from Hong Kong last week, and he brought a plethora of cai daos from Chan Chi Kee 陳枝記 to me. Now, as @abcdefg so strikingly ponted out: why would I need more than one, considering I already owned one? Well, I read a lot about the store in different knife fora, and became interested, and since cooking is a hobby, and I find kitchen knives interesting, and also considering that I very rarely have the opportunity to acquire things from Hong Kong, I just bought some extra ones, thinking that some of them will be gifts in the future. In this post there are also two doublets—these are knives that are for friends already, but I included them here, since I did some extensive measuring, and wanted to examine the precision and variables in the craft. I also include in the end my existing, first knife with the witty name SmartWife. I have not cooked a lot with them yet, so I will have to come back to that later. My idea is that, since I like the format of the knife so much, I will probably cook my daily non-chinese food with a cai dao as well, and for that maybe use the stainless one more, especially if I do not wish any metallic tang. And also when travelling or cooking at my friends’ place I will use the stainless. Here are the knives: The whole bouquet. Another shot. Unpacked. From uppermost left, reading like a book: KF1102, 1402, 1303, 1303, 1912, 1912 KF1303a KF1303a profile KF1303a blade front KF1303a measurements Weight 266,2 Length 310,00 Blade length 210,00 Blade height, bolster 86,10 Blade height, middle/max 90,75 Blade height, tip 89,45 g/cm² ratio 1,43 Spine thickness, bolster 2,50 Spine thickness, middle 1,70 Spine thickness, tip 1,10 KF1303b KF1303b profile KF1303b blade front KF1303b measurements Weight 253,3 Length 310,00 Blade length 210,00 Blade height, bolster 86,05 Blade height, middle/max 90,90 Blade height, tip 89,60 g/cm² ratio 1,36 Spine thickness, bolster 2,80 Spine thickness, middle 1,85 Spine thickness, tip 1,10 KF1912a KF1912a profile KF1912 blade front KF1912a tip profile KF1912a measurements Weight 274,3 Length 305,00 Blade length 203,00 Blade height, bolster 90,70 Blade height, middle/max 93,10 Blade height, tip 91,90 g/cm² ratio 1,47 Spine thickness, bolster 1,95 Spine thickness, middle 1,55 Spine thickness, tip 1,35 Blade thickness, middle height of tip side 1,55 KF1912b KF1912b profile KF1912 blade front KF1912b tip profile KF1912b measurements Weight 269,9 Length 305,00 Blade length 203,00 Blade height, bolster 90,00 Blade height, middle/max 93,15 Blade height, tip 90,55 g/cm² ratio 1,45 Spine thickness, bolster 1,95 Spine thickness, middle 1,60 Spine thickness, tip 1,40 Blade thickness, middle height of tip side 1,45 KF1102 KF1102 profile KF1102 blade front KF1102 Weight 417,7 Length 333,00 Blade length 231,00 Blade height, bolster 111,70 Blade height, middle/max 120,20 Blade height, tip 118,60 g/cm² ratio 1,56 Spine thickness, bolster 2,85 Spine thickness, middle 1,85 Spine thickness, tip 0,90 KF1402 KF1402 profile KF1402 blade front KF1402 measurements Weight 459,1 Length 278,00 Blade length 174,00 Blade height, bolster 85,40 Blade height, middle/max 109,90 Blade height, tip 109,35 g/cm² ratio 2,70 Spine thickness, bolster 5,70 Spine thickness, middle 5,35 Spine thickness, tip 3,50 SmartWife Nº2 SmartWife Nº2 profile SmartWife Nº2 blade front Smart Wife Nº 2 measurements Weight 305,2 Length 318,00 Blade length 204,00 Blade height, bolster 91,65 Blade height, middle/max 92,70 Blade height, tip 89,00 g/cm² ratio 1,62 Spine thickness, bolster 1,95 Spine thickness, middle 1,95 Spine thickness, tip 1,90
  5. 7 likes
    Just had an interview with East China Normal University. It went something like the below. Greeting with the interviewer. Where are you from type questions. Increasingly difficult questions to try to get a feel for my language level. First, simple language questions like who is your mother's mother, 外婆 or 奶奶? Then more open-ended questions that didn't really require special vocabulary like what can you do to make your parents happy? Lastly, open-ended questions that did include specialized and technical vocabulary like what professions can't be replaced by automation? Took 15 minutes on Skype. The connection was clear and I could hear the tester easily. He did also ask follow-up questions depending on my answers. EDIT: forgot the last segment. After the interview, he sent me an image of six lines of text and had me read it. Lastly, he told me it'd take about a week to get back to me on the results. P.S. I double posted this to ECNU's thread as well. Just want to make sure it is easily found.
  6. 6 likes
    I know a similar case. There is someone with major in engineering who was granted the semester scholarship. He applied for one year too but he had an interview with Hanban this morning on Wechat and they told him that Hanban is going to grant the semester scholarship first, and if he can prove he is a good student during this first semester he will be granted the second one. Apparently Hanban is fed up with many students in the past years who wasted their allowance money in partying, travelling when they should be attending classes, failing the HSK and so on. Basically many students took this scholarship as free vacations. And now, Hanban from this year wants to make sure that the students they choose are totally motivated to study chinese, becoming a chinese teacher, etc, and they think that the most motivated students are those who chose Chinese as their major. I bet you will be able to get it too.
  7. 6 likes
    Hi everyone! I'm a member of this forum since I applied for the scholarship last year. I just wanted to share with you what I've been told in my CI about the new changes As you guys already know If you wanna apply for a one-year scholarship in 汉语言文学 (Chinese Language and Literature)、中国历史 (Chinese History) or 中国哲学高级课程 (Chinese Philosophy) the requirement is to have a minimum of 180 points in the HSK 4 and HSKK intermediate. Last year my classmates and I applied for 汉语言文学 (Chinese Language and Literature) which required only a minimum of 180 in HSK 3. It took us by surprise when almost all of us got rejected by Hanban. Our CI told us that in my country Hanban rejected everyone who had less than 280 in HSK 3 which didn't make any sense at that time. Our conclusion was that each year there are more people applying so due to the high amount of applications Hanban had to choose only the ones who had higher scores. It got even worse this year when we wanted to apply again and realized that we needed the HSK 4 and HSKK中 certificates which we didn't have obviously. Our CI told us that this changed because Hanban has to make sure that applicants have a good domain of the language in order to understand more and get the most of those majors. At first we were pretty sad cause that meant we had to wait one more year to apply again! But fortunately our CI told us about the new major TCSOL that requires only a minimum of 270 points in the HSK 3. Our teachers introduced that major to us as a one-year-preparation program in chinese language before applying for the MTCSOL. So I suppose that's the new Chinese language program for 1 academic year now :/ By the way, I'm currently waiting for Hanban's ultimate decision as well ^^ Good luck for everyone who is applying this year
  8. 6 likes
    From what I'm reading in this thread, it seems like nobody's actually addressing the real issue that OP is facing, which is active language use (speaking, writing, constructing sentences actively). A lot of the suggestions have to do with what OP is actually good at, which is passive language use (listening, reading, comprehension). And there's also an insane focus on vocabulary, which it seems to me is not the actual issue that OP is facing right now. @adeliepingu, just to give you a quick and dirty background. I am a heritage Chinese speaker, but English is my native language. I previously was in a similar situation to you where passive language use was fine, but active language use was problematic. I eventually worked on improving my Chinese, and got an MATI for Chinese & English translation & interpreting, and have been working in the industry ever since. I am now basically fluent in Chinese (and have been living in China for the past couple years). From reading your post, I understand you want to improve the following things: 1) Chinese grammar; 2) not sounding like you're just speaking/writing English-ified Chinese; 3) increase reading speed; 4) accent. Increasing reading speed can only be done by reading more. That's it. Read the kind of text you are interested in reading more of, and you will read faster in that style of text. I read a lot of technical manuals & reports and news-related things, so my reading speed for those kinds of materials is fairly fast. Still a lot slower than all my Chinese colleagues, but I am not spending all day catching up at least. However, it can take me over a year to finish a Chinese novel, because that's not the typical type of reading material I read. Pick your battles. Chinese grammar & speaking/writing Chinese the way a Chinese person will speak/write is a different kettle of fish. One way to do it is to formally take a Chinese class not in America. Go spend a year in China/Taiwan and focus on the grammar stuff. Another way to improve your active use of Chinese is to use Chinese actively. In terms of conversation, I advocate shadowing as a good way to improve your speaking skills. Since you watch TV dramas, use them as part of your conversational training. Dramas set in the modern day would be best for this, because the style of language used in period dramas tend to not lend itself well to daily conversation. What you should do is shadow what the characters in the drama are saying. Basically, after one character speaks, repeat what they say after them. Do not pause the drama. It might be easier to just pick one character and shadow what that specific character is saying. This is how shadowing works. Let the character start speaking. Give him a 1-2 second lag, then repeat exactly what he is saying. This way, you are practicing your listening skills and are also actively using real Chinese (scripted by native Chinese speakers) in a real context. If you keep on doing this, you will begin to internalize how Chinese spoken by native speakers is expressed. You will find yourself beginning to use common turns of phrases and grammatical structures that you have been repeating. It will seem too much and too overwhelming in the beginning, because you won't be able to keep up. That's ok, you'll get better with practice. You should also focus on word collocation, or 词语搭配, which is probably another reason why your Chinese is so English-ified. Learn which verbs and nouns go together. When you are shadowing a native speaker speaking their native language, chances are high that they are speaking a lot faster than you can follow. That's also normal. If you can't catch up, or the speaker speaks fast naturally, focus on one specific part of grammar. For instance, collocation. Say, for example, the character you are shadowing says something like, “你真的能够准时完成我昨天给了你的任务吗?” If you are focusing on collocation, then you might listen and get the whole sentence, but instead of repeating exactly everything the character is saying, you just focus on matching words together. In this instance, you might just repeat out loud: “完成……任务”. Doing this will actively reinforce in your mind that these are the words you will want to use when you want to talk about completing tasks. This is one way to de-Englishify your Chinese. You can use this same method to internalize whatever part of Chinese grammar you feel you are lacking in, just really zero in on the one thing you plan on working on each time you begin shadowing for the day. Do not focus on more than one thing on each session. Shadowing is also a good method to practice your accent. Before you start, pick the accent you want. I'm serious. Don't try to mix accents up, it will confuse you. It would be even better if you pick a specific person you want to emulate, and then shadow only that specific person. While you are shadowing that person, record yourself. Do it in short segments. 1 minute, max. Listen to the recording of yourself and compare it with the original speaker. Where are your pronunciation problems? As always, focus on one thing at a time. If you are working on your fourth tone this session, don't worry if your 'ng' sounds are not clear. Focus on getting your fourth tone right, and only your fourth tone right that session. Work on your other accent issues in your next session. If you want to improve your writing, the method is the same, but instead of using spoken Chinese, use written Chinese. Copy a paragraph from a novel/story/whatever you are interested in/reading. Copy it exactly word for word, and then keep on writing the next couple paragraphs on your own. The first paragraph is just to get you into the style of how Chinese is expressed by a native speaker, so you need to pay attention while you are copying (just like you do when you are shadowing). Focus on grammar. Which words go where, and in what order? Ideally, pick a paragraph that focuses on one topic: true love, a historical event, etc. Then, in the two paragraphs after, emulate the writing as best you can, and continue it on your own. Honestly, for writing, if you have somebody who can critique your work, that would be best, but if you don't, this method will at least help you internalize the real sentence structures and forms of expression used by native Chinese speakers. Note: Written language and spoken language are two completely different things. Do not read out loud to practice your spoken language. Do not try to copy spoken language from your drama in written form. (I mean, you can do these things, but language expression differs when you're speaking vs when you're writing, so it kind of defeats the purpose a little bit.)
  9. 6 likes
    I'm very wary of any answer to this question which is trying to summarize the opinions of 1.4 billion people.
  10. 5 likes
    This is a guide about how to find a job teaching at a university in China without going through a job agency or advertisements. I'm writing this up so that those who are going through something similar as to what I did will know what to expect. Note that universities in China recruit foreign teachers from March to July each year for teaching positions that start in September. The earlier you start making enquiries the better, as it can take a while to find a suitable school and get all the paperwork finalised. Make a school short list To get a job as a foreign teacher (外教) in China, you should first make a short list of which universities you would like to apply for. You could consider the following things: 1) University ranking in general: If you want to work at a university which ranks well internationally, you can find out the ranking of different Chinese universities on Wikipedia. The highest ranking universities in mainland China are concentrated in Beijing, Shanghai and Guangzhou - outside of those are a handful of prestigious universities in each of the other major Chinese cities such as Hangzhou, Suzhou, Nanjing, Xi'an, Tianjin, Wuhan, Chengdu, Chongqing, Changsha, etc. Generally, the better a university is ranked, the more resources it will have, which in theory means a better working environment for you, and more opportunities for personal and career development. 2) University ranking in terms of discipline: You may also want to find out which universities in China rank well for the discipline you teach. If you speak Chinese, the best way to do this is to search on Baidu, or ask your Chinese friends or colleagues on WeChat. In many cases, schools which do not rank well overall often have very reputable programs for specific fields of study. 3) Living environment: If air pollution concerns you, you should know that there are only a few cities in China that have relatively clear air while also boasting decent universities. The ones I can think of off the top of my head are Xiamen, Dalian, Qingdao, Suzhou, Guilin and Kunming. 4) Cost of living: If you want to take advantage of a lower cost of living (lower rent, cheaper food, etc.), then you may wish to consider second or third tier cities. This would be especially beneficial if you want to have a completely English-free environment to practise Chinese, or you are not pursuing an academic career. Find out more about the schools After you have written up a short list of universities, you can start thinking about what questions you would like to ask them about what it would be like teaching there. Remember that the "waijiao" (foreign teacher) recruitment system is completely different to that of local teachers - most universities don't have "vacancies" per se, but instead will take on any teacher that approaches them and meets all the requirements (more on that later). Ideally, you should go to the universities directly and enquire in person. You will want to speak directly with the dean (院长) of the school you wish to work at. In some schools - especially the prestigious ones - you may not be able to track the dean down, in which case you can simply talk to the administrative staff at the personnel office (人事处), or similar. If you are unable to get to the university in person, the second best method is to email them a list of questions - though this should be followed-up by a phone call, as many universities in China do not respond to emails. If you can speak Chinese, I highly recommend you ask them in Chinese. If you don't speak Chinese, you can try in English. Even better, you could find a Chinese friend to help you communicate with them. You should ask about the following matters: 1) What is the salary range (before tax) for foreign teachers at your university? For most universities, this will be 7,500-9,000 RMB a month. Make sure you ask for a figure that is before tax, as some schools won't specify. The only way to get a higher salary would be if you have a doctorate degree, are well-known in your respective field or are applying for a private training provider (i.e. not a public university). 2) Does your school pay for foreign teachers' flight back home? If so, how much will the school reimburse? Most schools will reimburse foreign teachers' flights back home, but the exact amount they are willing to pay will vary from school to school. It's a good idea to get a clear figure for this. 3) Does your university provide free accommodation for foreign teachers? This can be a real deal-breaker, especially in first-tier cities, as renting can be very expensive. If the school does provide accommodation, ask them what it is like - e.g. what is its condition, is it on campus, do I get my own room? etc. 4) How many hours a week would I have to teach? This can vary, but in most cases you would be teaching roughly 10-14 class periods (课时), with each period lasting 45 minutes. That's 7.5-10.5 hours a week. This is, of course, one of the advantages of teaching in a university in China - the pay may be low, but the teaching load is low as well, so you will have plenty of other time to take on other jobs, or pursue personal interests. 5) What subjects would I be teaching, specifically? If this is a concern for you, you could ask about this. Apply for a work permit To get a work visa, you need a work permit. To get a work permit, you will need to provide about a dozen different documents. There are four that are particularly troublesome that you should start preparing as soon as possible: 1) Authentication of highest qualification (最高学历证书认证). You will need to supply a copy of your highest qualification (e.g. Master's diploma) that has been authenticated by the Chinese government (for diplomas from Chinese universities) or a Chinese embassy (for diplomas from non-Chinese universities). If you are currently in the middle of a Master's program, ask if you can supply a certificate from your university to satisfy this requirement. The policy is getting stricter now though, so you may not be able to do this anymore. 2) At least two years' teaching experience (两年以上教学经验). You will need to provide a certificate from the school that hired you, proving that you worked there for at least two years. Some universities will strictly require that that experience be at a university level, and won't accept experience teaching at a high school, training school or similar. Note this experience requirement can usually be waived if you have a TEFL/TESL certificate. 3) Criminal record check (无犯罪记录证明). This should be authenticated by the Chinese embassy of your home country. If you have lived some time in China, you may be able to simply get a check from the Public Security Bureau instead. 4) Health certificate (健康证明). This should be issued by a Chinese embassy or from an international travel healthcare centre in China. It's basically just a physical examination (体检). After you have received offers from a number of schools, you can start narrowing them down. You may find that salary and teaching hours are more or less the same for most schools, so you may want to consider only schools that offer free accommodation, though you should find out what that accommodation is like beforehand. Once you have decided on a school, you will be dealing mostly with the administrative staff to get all the paperwork in time for the work permit so you can apply for a work visa. Note that if you are already in China on another visa, you will not be able to apply for a work visa from within China - the government requires that you apply for it in your home country. Well, that's all of the important things I can think of. I hope someone out there finds this useful. If you have any questions, feel free to ask away, though I think some of the other users on this forum will be able to do a better job at answering them than me. Remember that everything in this post is just a rough guide - things are always changing in China, so it is best to confirm with the school directly should you have any concerns.
  11. 5 likes
    @foreigner2u Guess what! I woke up this morning to a status update from Hanban and it's been corrected! It's a miracle! I can rest easy Thanks so much for your help and all the advice!
  12. 5 likes
    Yeah, sound components like 京 are taken by many scholars as evidence that there were probably consonant clusters in Old Chinese. Most reconstruct it as *kr- rather than *kl- or *gl-. But essentially, some syllables dropped the k (and the r became an l) and some dropped the r (and the k became a j in Mandarin). The same thing happens with 各, which shows up in 路, 絡, 洛, etc.
  13. 5 likes
    hey guys,, sorry i didnt get back sooner, had forgotten my password and a lot was going on, but anyway, i just came to update the forum.. finished my meds for one month and did the test afterwards, it came back negative,, and im now waiting for the 6th month test which should be in 3 or 4 months, feeling confident so ya.
  14. 5 likes
    Hi guys, quick and short post about the estimated waiting times for the CIS. Let me know what you think!! Estimated waiting time for the CIS
  15. 5 likes
    Hey guys, last year I applied for the CIS and made several posts explaining all the details. The blog is in Spanish but if there's enough interest I can translate it into English. Let me know what you think EDIT https://unaestrellademaraventurera.wordpress.com/2017/04/26/cis-application-process/ I translated the "most important" one, let me know if you'd be interested in reading the rest of them.
  16. 4 likes
    It's a witty remark, but I wouldn't call it aphorism. Basically Song Ma is saying, if your mouth is so lihai, why do you cry when you can't bite your sesame cake (which is quite often according to Yingzi's explanation in the next paragraph). It's a play on the meaning of 厲害. In the first half 嘴巴厲害 means 說話很厲害 (often described in Chinese as 牙尖嘴利 or 伶牙俐齒), having a smart mouth; in the second half 厲害 means physically strong, 吃東西很厲害, i.e. 什麼都咬得動. Hope it helps.
  17. 4 likes
    I work in the Chinese video game industry, mostly on mobile games, but what @NinKenDo states is a very real truth. In speaking and working with a variety of developers and operation teams, I would say the following characteristics are pretty common: complete and utter lack of originality, lack of planning & vision, slavish focus on making money, unwillingness to take on risk & responsibility. Lack of Originality. I don't think anybody is at all surprised about the utter lack of originality in China. If you think about it, they are taught to copy since childhood. Nobody writes original essays, they have to memorize and copy old essays that are proven to be good. Children are actually penalized for being original! This means that to them, piracy is actually a good thing. For the Chinese gaming public, this is what they expect, so it doesn't matter to the developers at all. Every single non-Western inspired Chinese game is basically a copy and/or mishmash of the Three Kingdoms, wuxia, Journey to the West, and every single bit of Chinese history & mythology available out there. There are so many freaking Sun Wukongs and Zhao Yuns in games out there, that I can't even begin to count them. I know of a brand new mobile game that is a copy of a shitty browser game that was a copy of a very successful mobile game that came out over 5 years ago. Can you even imagine any western developers who would make a copy of a shitty game that was a copy of another game? One of the first games I ever worked on was a pirate game. Since it was a pirate game, it naturally had every single character from Pirates of the Caribbean in it. They told me that there were no IP issues, because they hand painted the images. They didn't directly rip off the official movie stills, guys! They totally copied redrew everything from scratch! And flipped them so they were facing the other direction! And since Jack Sparrow's bandanna was now green and not red, he wasn't Jack Sparrow at all, right? Right? Clearly nobody would know! And when I requested that they rethink this, and perhaps draw a brand new character from scratch, they asked how much they could change the image so they wouldn't get sued while simultaneously ensuring that people knew that it was still Captain Jack Sparrow. Lack of Planning & Vision. When I work with developers on their products, one of the first things I typically ask them are for design documents & for their vision of what the game is going to be like, and their plan for implementing their ideas on their design documents. Of the Chinese development teams I've worked with, I know of only one team that actually has any kind of a game design document at all, and any kind of a plan at all, in terms of what the game will be like. Most Chinese developers I know, don't even have a plan for their next update, even though the update might be due tomorrow. Literally. Games like World of Warcraft, The Witcher, Assassins Creed actually has somebody with a huge overarching vision of what the game is going to be like. There is a specific style to the game, there is an actual storyline that makes sense. There's somebody with a vision for what the game is going to be like, and people actually listen to this person. And this person actually has the power to make sure that the game follows his and/or his team's vision. Not so much with Chinese games. The pirate game didn't just include Jack Sparrow & friends in their merry 19th century sailing escapades, Kylo Ren was there. So was BB-8. Your epic pirate vessel could be upgraded to a Banshee from Starcraft, and that Banshee could eventually be upgraded to... another random 19th century-esque sailing ship. And not only that, your ship can have pets a la World of Warcraft! Most Chinese games I've seen are basically a mish-mash of whatever was awesome at the time. New awesome Star Wars movie? I guarantee you that most Chinese games are going to have BB-8 and Stormtroopers running around in them, whether or not this actually makes sense for the game. Slavish Focus on Making Money. When game design decisions are made (and here I use the words "game design" very loosely), it's based on player and revenue numbers, and they pretty much focus on hot trends and have very short term thinking. If Star Wars happens to be the new in thing, you're going to get Darth Vader and R2D2 running around in your video game, whether or not these characters actually fit the design criteria for the game. If the next new thing after Star Wars is Pirates of the Caribbean, you bet your ass that Capt. Jack Sparrow & Elizabeth Swann are going to make an appearance, even though they have precious little to do with Darth Vader (or even the game itself) at all. Most successful Western (and Japanese) developers actually prioritize a storyline and a good vision, and make plans for their game. Of course they want to make money, but they understand that just because Star Wars is popular today doesn't mean that adding Yoda to their awesome gothic haunted house game is going to make sense in terms of the style of the game or game play. For these developers, the game is the core of their design decisions. For Chinese developers, it's whatever their boss wants, and if their boss typically only cares about income in the short term, they'll do whatever the boss says. Because that's how they roll. Unwillingness to Take on Risk & Responsibility. I had a really long conversation with one of my Chinese friends about this. He told me to think of the typical Chinese person. This is somebody who's basically had their entire life planned out for them: primary school, test into the best middle school, test into the best high school, ace the gaokao, go to Tsinghua/Beida, graduate with honors, continue onwards with a graduate degree from Harvard/Princeton/Oxbridge, return to China, find an amazing high paying job, get married, have a baby... Their entire life's decisions have been practically planned out for them since they were babies. And there's always a penalty for them if they want to do things their way. Don't want to listen to mom & dad/grandma & grandpa and go to university? Oh look, now you're unemployed/dirt poor/worthless/working a shitty job. Life becomes unpredictable. You stand out. If there is a person who wants to design a game, he's going to have to stand out and take responsibility for the game and its performance. If the game he designed flops, he's going to take the blame for it (rightly or wrongly), and there's not very many Chinese people willing to take that risk. It's just easier to listen to your boss, even if you disagree with his decisions, because at the end of the day, if the game flops, it's not your fault. You were the good employee doing what your boss told you to do. If the game does well, you'll get a good bonus at Chinese New Year. Either way you win. Or at the very least, you lose less. I feel like this is already a long enough wall of text. It's extremely frustrating for me, because I feel like there are so many amazing stories that can be told via video games in China about Chinese history/mythology or even just about modern Chinese daily life in general, but there's simply not any developers or Chinese people who have the ability and who are willing to do it. I imagine it will happen at some point, but from where I currently stand, that's going to be a long time coming.
  18. 4 likes
    Okay I think I can make a small update. I finished a drama called 完美男人 and I've started watching 歡樂送 第二部. I've found the characters easier to understand than the first season. But I'm fairly confident that's just because there's way more dubbing going on this season. I really liked turning whole episodes into audio flashcards for the first season but it's too much work to do that anymore and I really don't have much time for that at the moment. What I have done is gone back to adding more upper intermediate ChinesePods into flashcards. They're definitely starting to feel how I remember the elementary ones felt a few years ago. I'm so comfortable with them that I delete all the speech pauses from the sentences as I just get impatient waiting for them to finish the sentence. Another good sign. I think the main benefit of these podcasts at this point is vocabulary building and habitualising some of the more exotic vocabulary. I listened to a whole bunch of HSK5 audio test material in the example quizzes (didn't do other sections as they seem a bit trivial, except for maybe the synonym distinction) and found I could only get around 50% correct. I think the lack of vocabulary was the problem. But not sure. Could just be that my listening is still not up to scratch. Also the pacing and style of delivery of the audio material I find really annoying. So artificial. I think I'll stick with the podcasts, audiobooks and tv shows for listening material. Ive almost finished reading 工廠女孩 and 流星蝴蝶劍 and I finished 黄昏的男孩. I'm making an effort to finish more novels because im in the mood to buy some more and I don't want to just amass lot of unread novels. My efforts to actually speak more have gone well. Ive found someone whom is willing to speak to me for 15 minutes each week which I find helpful. Obviously not enough but it's a start. Reading about everyone's successes here, seeing other people speak fluently and passing HSK6 is providing me with inspiration to keep trying. I still hope one day I can go to a Chinese speaking country one day too so I can put into practice everything I've been doing here at home. I think this is my "end goal" thats about it!
  19. 4 likes
    @foreigner2u there's way quite some things we've been dealing with. To sum it up (while keeping it 100% true) the university doesn't care at all about us. Their way to talk to us is always threatening, assuming we're liars and we want to cheat (yep, as good as it sounds). Everything they want done is told with the accompanying sentence "or we revoke your scholarship". Every time all of us ask something or need something, we get silence for an answer. We've been left without hot water 4 or 5 times during the year and this last one we haven't had showers for six full days (and counting). When we went to the office to ask where we could shower, they told us to find a friend with shower. There's many more examples but I guess you get the idea. Overall, I know things in Asia work differently but I've NEVER encountered anyone telling me they get treated like 12 year-old lying and cheating kids, apart from not receiving any help when they mess up. Don't get me wrong, I love China and I love Xi'an
  20. 4 likes
    Very bizarre comparisons. I think it's more like a pilot who completes all necessary tasks in a safe manner but happens to have body odour. Or a surgeon who saves people's lives but is an asshole. We already know from the great case study that is life, that foreign-accented English is not the same thing as non-proficient English. I have very little trouble adjusting to understand Scott's accent, so let's give credit where credit is due instead of being ridiculous. What he achieved in a non-classroom environment in 3 years is already better than half the people who graduated a four-year degree program in Chinese language and culture at our local "world-class university", so he certainly did SOMETHING right. Edit: Full disclosure I graduated from that program and I have impeccably "Standard" Chinese but I was one of very very very very very few.
  21. 4 likes
    I've chatted with him several times at the Mandarin meetup in our area, and I wasn't aware that he is still meeting with tutors. From what I recall, Chinese is kind of just one of his ongoing side projects now. Also his Chinese is actually really good, pronunciation notwithstanding, so I don't really get the accent elitism going on here either. He's also not a language-learning expert, just a blogger, and I don't think he ever painted himself as anything different. He's also super humble, just as an aside. edit: Okay "really good" is not specific enough, but what I mean is that he converses freely, fluidly, and without noticeable misunderstandings for hours at a time with native speakers and me on a regular basis.
  22. 4 likes
    @Blckclaw Welcome to the waiting club here haha All you can do now is wait for Hanban's last decision It's Monday already in China so it means that a whole new week has started. Hopefully we will have news this time >.< the waiting is driving me crazy
  23. 4 likes
    @Flickserve you speak two languages fluently already. That makes you better with languages than most English speakers already. Also pretty much no one has a natural talent for languages. The difference is between how much work people put in. If someone complemented me on a second language and then said they don't have "an ear" for languages, that's basically a slap in the face, suggesting I was just born lucky rather than busting my balls every day every year to learn the language!
  24. 4 likes
    Of course it also raised the fear, Do I sound that bad?
  25. 4 likes
    My classmate did, in the beginning of May.
  26. 4 likes
    Man the wait for the final response is soooo painful. Tell me I am not the only one that checks the website in the morning and evening just because. Lol
  27. 4 likes
    As requested and thanks for abcd's beautiful posts, I'd like to give an (amateur) introduction to 龙井茶, or Dragon Well (green) tea. Sadly, I am new to the world of tea, and I don't have a real camera, so bear with me! Further, Dragon Well tea has a long (royal) history full of legends and myth, and I am ignorant of many of these stories. I will begin with the background before jumping into the tea itself – feel free to skip ahead, the earlier sections are unimportant if you just want to see and drink the tea. Introduction: Etymology 龙井茶, literally Dragon Well Tea, derives its name from a (water) well in 龙井村 on the outskirts of Hangzhou 杭州 in 浙江. Legend goes that Hangzhou had a dry spell that ran for several years, depriving much of the area of its water and emptying wells all across the city except for one. That this well never dried up was attributed to a dragon who came from the sea and lived in its depths, continuously refilling the well. The well has since been developed and now has a stone wall surrounding it – you can still see it in the old village. Actually, there are now two towns that bear the name Longjing and you should be careful when setting out. The original “Old Longjing” (where the famous temple once stood and was recently rebuilt) and other “New Longjing” (constructed around 2002/2003 for tourism purposes and largely filled with hotels and restaurants). Look for the one with the temple and the well. If visiting, also try to check out the 茶叶博物馆, a nice museum down the road from the original well devoted to the history of tea. They often have tastings of tea you can find in the gift shop at an inflated price. Region 龙井茶 actually refers to two regions. When making a purchase, the first is simply referred to as 龙井茶, but should be more accurately called 浙江龙井茶. The second is referred to as 西湖龙井茶. Both are from the province of Zhejiang 浙江, but the latter comes from the areas immediately surrounding 杭州 and its famous West Lake 西湖. Whether there is actually a difference or not often depends on who you ask, but 杭州人 are extremely defensive when it comes to the nuances they consider particular to the area around 西湖 in 杭州. They hold the terroir and even the particular kind of moisture in the air (once described to me as “the wet air that comes off Xihu西湖 and mixes with that which comes off Qiantang River 钱塘江) to make a unique tea, similar to how the Burgundians would refuse to call a wine grown from burgundy grapes the same if it was grown in Napa, California. Within the realm of 西湖龙井are several mountains. The most famous ones are 狮峰山、龙井村、云栖、虎跑、梅家坞. When walking around Hangzhou, many tea stores will have 狮、龙、云、虎、梅 on a large poster outside or in the window to advertise which village their tea comes from. The most famous three are 狮峰,龙井and梅家坞. The latter two are very nice locales to relax for a day, sipping tea and strolling through the tea fields if visiting. If you like 麻将, you can play with views of the rolling hills covered in tea while sipping on one grown within walking distance. 梅家坞 is also called an "oxygen bar" as the air is considered so much cleaner than the rest of Hangzhou. The vast majority of people outside Hangzhou will actually be purchasing Zhejiang Longjing – I’ve heard more than one tea store owner say that there is no real Xihu Longjing tea sold outside Hangzhou as the area is simply too small to produce any exportable amounts and is instead sold for a (large) premium within the city, and to friends. A store owner in Shanghai who makes an annual trip to purchase bulk Xihu Longjing to sell to Japanese tourists told me that Xihu Longjing is the most commonly counterfeited tea in Shanghai – a city less than an hour away by 高铁. Seasons When speaking of Longjing, people say “雨前是上品,明前是珍品.” The best 龙井 is 明前茶, or that which is picked before 清明节. For a good example of 明前龙井茶, you can expect to pay at least 2,000 kuai /斤. You can generally pick up 50g tins for around 200 kuai – almost every home in Hangzhou seems to have one for when guests arrive. When pressed, locals will generally admit to buying 雨前茶, or tea picked before the heavy rains arrive (generally April/May) for themselves. Several local tea shops have told me you’d be hard-pressed to tell the difference unless an expert in tea, and the price can often fall quite a bit. One reason to buy earlier tea is that the colder weather prevents bugs from eating the tea leaves, but as warmer (and wetter) weather approaches many of the farmers begin using pesticides. Since this tea is from later in the season, it’s generally not worth remaining organic anyway - it's no longer a premium product. Some organic teas do exist, but they are often grown alongside those which have pesticides. Earlier teas tend to be simply drunk while some suggest later teas need to be rinsed (extremely briefly) with hot water prior to steeping to remove the pesticides. The tea also differs drastically year to year – people say this year was abnormally cold and then comment on the quality or amount of tea. A common question when chatting with local tea fans is “How does this tea compare to last year’s?” Unfortunately, I am new to the neighborhood and cannot comment on this - maybe next year! The Tea Longjing of the Xihu or Zhejiang variety can be told apart by its flat, long leaves. The legend goes that an emperor visited Hangzhou and went to drink some tea. Before leaving, he took the tea and put it between the pages of his books for his long journey home. Upon arriving, the tea was flattened by the book and thought ruined, but both the emperor and his mother thought it attractive and delicious. After that, the tea became one of the favorites of emperors (I believe starting in the Ming) and he declared several of these trees to be royal property - they still stand in the old town. 龙井茶 is produced by 炒 (frying? Roasting? Stir frying?) – not quite sure how to translate this. This compares to other teas such as Japanese Sencha (蒸汽 – steam), 普洱 (日晒 –sun dried), or 安吉白茶 (烘焙 – baked). I’d recommend a visit to Hangzhou if for no other reason than to watch the older craftsmen working their hands in a giant wok full of tea – a feast for the eyes and the nostrils! Once heard someone remark that you can tell the age of the roaster by looking at the tea leaves – an older roaster will have so many years of experience that simply through touch and smell, they know the exact moment the tea is finished and will avoid the “burnt” ends that are common to younger roasters. Machines, on the other hand, totally avoid the burned ends, but produce an inferior tea. The most expensive Longjing is that sold with just the buds, no leaves. I’m not particularly fond of this – too 淡 for my uncultivated taste buds, and it lacks the 涩 quality that I like in Longjing. Most people I’ve met share this conclusion – and I would avoid it unless you’re really down the rabbit hole of tea drinking. Instead, find tea sold either with one leaf or two leaves, plus the bud. Dragon Well tea differs based on the age and shape of the bush upon which it is grown. Newer teas are planted in straight rows and all look about the same size, while the older trees tend to be of a variety of shapes and sizes. You will see both in the villages, but I’m not an expert on this and can’t afford the old tree tea to compare, so I shall leave this for another day (or decade). Brewing There are three methods for brewing tea in a glass, and 西湖龙井 should be made with the 中投法. You can also make it in a gaiwan. Abcd has covered this in another post, but I will briefly summarize. You can use a tall glass or a short glass, whatever is on hand, but it should lack any coloration or decoration so as to allow you to see the tea. Water for Longjing should definitely be far off a boil – 80 degrees is all you need, more than that will destroy the tea. Gross approximations can be had by boiling and letting the water sit for a minute, or by pouring the water into another vessel before pouring it over the tea: First, fill the glass 1/3 with water and swish it around to warm the glass. Pour this water out (preferably into a bowl to use to water your plants once it’s cool – can’t be wasting water!). Next, refill the glass 1/3 of the way with water. Add the tea. While I’ve heard people say 2 grams, I find this up to personal taste. My girlfriend likes very few leaves, I like a bit more. Gently swish the glass to wet all the leaves. This prevents them from simply sitting on top and not getting brewed. Fourth, fill the glass, but leave enough space on top to hold your fingers – this is to avoid burning your lips when drinking, and (I think!) to let you stick your nose in and take a nice whiff. A big draw for Longjing is how pretty the leaves are, and so once you fill the glass you should enjoy watching them dance. The ideal is to be sitting near Xihu on a warm spring day chatting with friends: a person pours and you all continue chatting while observing your tea's infusion. Once infused, you take a moment to enjoy the fragrance before gently sipping, using your teeth to stop any debris from entering your mouth. Once the glass is back to being 1/3rd of the way full, add more hot water. You can continuously do this until it's too light for you - grandpa brewers generally add extra leaves so the first few infusions are too strong, but the latter are still nice. Not sure I'd recommend doing that if drinking at home. A note of warning: water is critical. Tea fans will say the best water is mountain water while the worst is well or river water, but Hangzhou natives will be even more particular and seek out water from 虎跑梦泉, Tiger Dream Spring, which is said to produce a particularly sweet cup of tea due to its mineral content. There are actually several springs scattered around the 龙井area and most will do, but the water is of questionable value today. Hangzhou locals now swear you can only use 农夫山泉, a brand of water sold across China. They specify that it must be the one sold in Zhejiang (which is sourced from 千岛湖), and my teacher says she’s met a lady in Beijing who actually has it sent to her rather than drink her local 农夫山泉. Those less picky can use any bottled water or high quality tap water. Finally, don’t be worried to dry other drinking vessels. I only included glass because it is the second most used method here (after grandpa brewing – see abcd’s posts). I actually prefer to use a gaiwan because I find the fragrance is more easily appreciated using the lid to trap it. Same as above, but let the lid sit over the tea. When ready, lift the lid and keep its cavity pointed down until you reach the nose, then lift and smell. Comparisons I have three varieties of Longjing at home and will show you them both dry (before brewing) and after brewing. This is a nice example of 西湖龙井; you can expect to pay at least 2,000 kuai for a 斤, or around $285. I am not sure of the mountain, but note the yellowish green leaves. This is a characteristic most associated with the tea from 狮峰山, though I can’t say for sure. It is a 明前茶 and was picked in the few days before 清明节. This was given to me by a tea house owner friend. It is a fragrant cup, grassy (often described as bean-y) with sweet undertones to the smell. It’s beautiful in the cup –the leaves dance up and down. The flavor is delicious – slightly astringent but sweet, and tastes a bit desserty. You can see that once I remove the leaves, they are largely 一芽一叶 and 一芽两叶. Since most of them are in one piece, it was probably handpicked and hand roasted – machine picking/roasting tends to break up the leaves. The leaves together with the stick also tend to create a beautiful cup of dancing tea leaves (see picture) as the leaves tend to sink and the sticks tend to float, which creates Longjing's famous dancing effect. This second sample is from a different friend. Her friend owns an organic tea farm in the town of Longjing and gifted me this tea as a way of introducing her friend's goods – the market price is similar to the one above. Note the leaves are a darker green – both these teas were picked before 清明节, and the darker color might be attributed to the mountain, or to the roaster. Somebody more experienced can generally tell the two apart, but I can't. Perhaps hard to see in this picture, but there is also a tiny amount of white fuzz on some of the leaves. This tea has less fragrance than the first cup, but is slightly more caramel-y in flavor. You can tell that both of these were hand roasted as there are some pieces slightly burned and the pieces remain largely whole. Another nice cup of tea. This is a “cheap" or "middle of the road" 龙井. It is 雨前 but 清明节后, so it is picked later in the season than the other two teas. After the above tea was gifted to me, I felt I had to make a purchase. The gift was a good quality tea and I didn’t worry about it originally, but I regreted buying this tea after receiving it. I wanted an everyday tea and asked for something in the price range of 300 kuai; this tea was 500 kuai for 250 grams, which was subsequently lowered to 400 kuai for the “friend price.” That’s around $50-60 for 250 grams of tea. This tea is nothing to write home about and I think it points to something important when it comes to Longjing – cheap Longjing from Xihu isn’t worth it. The fragrance is muted and no specific smells stand out – it lacks the sweetness of the other samples. You can also see both in the glass and once the leaves are spent that there are numerous sticks, which makes for an unpleasant drinking experience and carries very little in the way of flavor, but makes the bag heavier for selling purposes. It’s still not as bad as the Longjing you find in supermarkets – I’ve seen these sold where half the bag is made up of sticks, and the leaves are chopped to bits. Still, there is none of the dancing that I saw in the last two cups – the leaves sink almost immediately while the sticks float even if you leave them in the water. None of the leaves have even the slightest hint of being burned, but many are destroyed. Probably machine roasted or picked. Not many buds either. I have plenty of teas in the house that I bought for cheaper and make a much nicer cup of tea. Recently purchased 50 grams of a Wuyi Rock Oolong which was 800 kuai/jin (a little over $100) and I reach for it every day but stop myself for fear of running out – this Longjing has largely been relegated to what I grandpa brew throughout the school day. Note that this Longjing actually costs more than the Oolong. If on a tight budget, I’d ignore the Xihu Longjing and explore the broader area of Zhejiang – many other towns make beautiful cups of green tea that don’t come with the glamour of a 西湖 tea. Hope to come back to one of those in a later post. Conclusion While I've had little luck in the way of finding budget 龙井茶, I would still recommend to invest in a small tin of the good stuff - it's a wonderful tea to drink, and one of the ten most famous teas ( @abcdefg has posted about some of the other most famous teas - you can find his posts here https://www.chinese-forums.com/forums/topic/54133-tea-articles-a-users-guide/ ). It's a sweet and fragrant tea and properly brewed (i.e. at a low enough temperature) should please even those who grew up adding sugar to their teas. It's also easy to brew - I've almost never seen it served in anything other than a plain old glass, except maybe in a gaiwan or a small 景德镇 cup (supposed to elevate the color of the tea, though at the expense of the dancing). There is also actually a shop on Taobao owned by a famous tea factory in Hangzhou - I'd have to ask my teacher if somebody was interested in the link.
  28. 4 likes
    Probably said in Cantonese; that 唔 represents more or less the Cantonese equivalent of 不, though pronounced differently of course.
  29. 4 likes
    This '了' is not le, but liǎo, it means 'end; finish'. See also 没完没了 - endlessly; without end. Incidentally, it seems you are reading a novel, and encountering various different new words and usage patterns. Rather than starting a whole bunch of separate threads for each item, it might be better to start a single thread about the book(this would be the place to do it). The benefit of doing this is that other people reading the book will have a single place of reference for vocab they might encounter while reading.
  30. 4 likes
    @Luxin At which stage (CI or university) did you get that update? Maybe there's something wrong with your documents (format or what have you). When in doubt, check @hoshinoumi's blog entry - https://unaestrellademaraventurera.wordpress.com/2017/04/26/cis-application-process/ According to this, " 推荐机构 (tuījiàn jīgòu) Recommending Institution (the Confucius Institute that is recommending us for the scholarship (...))" So is it that your CI is still reviewing your application or your uni wants your recommending CI to review your application? If it's the CI I'd say contact them again and ask for them to hurry up, CIS places at unis are filled pretty quickly and the longer they hold up your application the smaller your chance of getting in.
  31. 4 likes
    Sounds interesting. I might try and get a translation of one of these books. I love this topic/theme! I'm still in the process of reading a Chinese translation of Factory Girls. I like it not because it's new or interesting, but makes me nostalgic for when I was staying in Dongguan and the countryside with all the kinds of people described in the book. It feels very personal and familiar. Contrary the OP I feel like not much has changed at all in China since the early 2000s. Anyway, this thread reminded me of one part of Factory Girls which I thought was really apposite to this forum. At the end of the first part of the book it describes the students all maniacally studying English vocabulary through a kind of flashcard machine for 12 hours a day. In the end they can all recite English really well but have trouble putting together basic sentences in a conversation and are too shy to use the language. To me this just sounded like the Chinese version of my own life, sitting around drilling flashcards but never actually really using the language and thus not getting anywhere! While the Dongguan factory-English seems quaint, my own "high tech" method is just as ridiculous when I think about it (except the part about doing it for 12 hours a day)
  32. 4 likes
    Really, where? I guess they changed the website around. I looked around for longer than I care to admit and I didn't see it again... FOUND the way! The link to PayPal is there but you have to make it appear. Here's how I did it (not saying it's the only way, but after searching all over, this is the only way I could find): - Dumped a book in my shopping cart. - Went to the shopping cart window. Clicked on 'Settlement', a window pops-up - The new Window only has obvious links to Alipay and Wechat, but below those 2 big labels there is a discrete line of links in small print, with a 'Recharge' ( 去充值) link on the right。Click it. - Another window opens, with a button saying 'RMB recharge' (in Chinese, of course). Click it. - Yet another pop-up Window, this tie with 3 buttons: Alipay, Wechat and...PayPal. But the PayPal button is rather faint and not active...suspense mounts... - Above those buttons there are small radio buttons next to various amounts of RMB...you select 100 RMB or over and, lo and behold, the PayPal link light up and welcomes you with open arms !!! There you are. That's how it can be done...Phew I am not sure how good the set-up is to keep you linked to your credit, you definitely must be sure that you're logged in Douban and your account is recognised. It may be better to buy a cart-full of books at a time and use up as much of your credit as you can, in case the balance gets lost in translation. I haven't had any problems with Duokan and the Apple store, but I must admit I haven't been monitoring all that closely. ...You beat me to it LiMo, but I wrote a lot more and nicer too
  33. 4 likes
    No peeking, you should be able to get this one... 海湖庄园
  34. 4 likes
    It's a bad translation of 'be water, my friend'. Don't get this tattooed.
  35. 4 likes
    @igacave Be prepared to answer questions (in Chinese, of course!) about your personal background and your Chinese learning background (where you studied, how long for, what you do to study in your own time), any previous experiences of having been to China, your previous experiences studying at university, what you can bring to Nanjing Normal University's student community, what you plan to do during your time in China and Nanjing other than studying, your motivation for undertaking the MTCSOL, what research topic you have thought about and your future plans after you complete the program. Good luck! Probably, but bear in mind that the less popular universities may have a smaller number of places available for scholarship students.
  36. 3 likes
    I don't think we really agree here, though. You remind me of someone who was taking a linguistics course in China who had this weird idea that western linguists simply can't capture any Chinese linguistics accurately. Perhaps I should have said "any inaccuracies that exist are being actively examined and debunked". You can read some of the papers written in English, but if you don't like the words adjective, adverb, and verb, you are going to hate the words you see in a paper about Chinese.
  37. 3 likes
    @earthtojess Yeah I also think you shouldn't lose hope! (sorry If I made you feel otherwise, that wasn't my intention at all!) T_T I'm just saying that they might ask you to change major/category if this time they decide to stick with their requirements. As I said before, last year there was a high demand of scholarships so Hanban decided to grant them only to people with higher scores (even to people that had more than 250 in their HSK 4 when the minimum requirement was HSK3 180) I can guarantee that since I talked to several people here on this forum at that time ^^ There's also a possibility that they can be flexible with the scores this year too cause for example Jelly is applying for the Philosophy major which requires HSK4 or 方茹婷 who is applying for TCSOL but doesn't have a Chinese major and they both still got accepted by their first choice of uni! PS: About the 录取 stage, every host uni makes their own remarks, so we all might be in the same stage but have different observations ^^
  38. 3 likes
    Those are all great places and I hope you all have a very good time. Here's an English-speaking guide in Xi'an that always gets favorable reviews and has done so over the span of several years. Name is Bryan Bai. I do not know his rates. Website: http://xianhistorytourguide.com/ E-mail: 13991987358@139.com. https://www.tripadvisor.com/members-forums/bryanbai The Moslem Quarter in Xi'an has excellent street food, and lamb specialty dishes are not to be missed, with 羊肉泡馍 at or near the top of the list. Eating it is an experience that is hard to duplicate elsewhere. In Hangzhou, be sure to take time to visit the Longjing tea hills, right outside of town. One can get there by public bus or of course by taxi. It's a good place to have lunch as well as to sample their world-famous tea. 东坡肉 is a regional specialty that I've enjoyed there several times; it's named after a famous statesman and poet. A lesser-known spot in Hangzhou that is worth the trouble is the five-story Leifeng Pagoda on the south side of West Lake. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leifeng_Pagoda Nanjing has a top-notch museum with a world-class collection of 清白 pottery from the Ming and Qing. It's often overlooked in the rush to see more popular things such as the Nanjing Massacre Museum and the section of the (Ming) Great Wall. Nanjing is known throughout China for its osamanthus-flavored salt duck 南京盐水鸭. Less fancy fare that is usually excellent there is their soup-filled dumplings 灌汤小笼包。Inexpensive and delicious.
  39. 3 likes
    I just thought I'd share a news website I recently discovered called Tingwen. http://tingwen.me/ It basically just contains a series of short news stories, complete with audio. Here's why a like it: 1. Each news story is very short (normally 10-20 lines of text), so you should be able to read at least one a day, no matter how busy you are. 2. Each story comes with its own audio read by a native speaker in clear and standard Mandarin (although the background music might be off putting to some). 3. There are a lot of articles every day (I counted over 50 just for today), covering a range of subjects, from technology to politics, so there should be something here to interest everyone. 4. The website itself is very clean and tidy, and the articles are written in a nice large font (not the mess of pop-up adds and tiny fonts you get with many other Chinese websites) All in all, it's quite similar to The Chairman's Bao website, albeit without the separate HSK levels and learning support. So long as you're confident enough in your Chinese to be able to handle native materials by yourself, then I think this site is really useful for improving your news-related reading and listening skills.
  40. 3 likes
    1.Country/Region of Origin: Pakistam 2.College applying to; School of Life Science of Biotechnology 3.Program: Masters 4.Have you done your previous studies in China?: No 5.What Scholarship(s) have you applied for?: CSC – through the university 6.How did you notarize your documents?: Notary Public 7.How did you do your medical checkup ?: Local Physician 9.Status of your application: Received Pre-Admission letter. Scholarship Status "under review" I emailed the university in early April, they told me that the scholarship result will be announced in end of April or early May. A friend of mine went to the international office recently and they told him that they will announce the results on the 10th of May. So keep your fingers crossed everyone!
  41. 3 likes
    If you are looking for "be like water", 若水 is a "translation", but a tattoo of that would simply be nonsense. Think of it this way: would you tattoo the words "like water" on yourself in English? If yes, then get a tattoo that says 若水 on it, and no one will ever know it was an intended Bruce Lee "reference" except you. P.S. honestly I feel like getting the whole 上善若水 calligraphy piece tattooed on you by someone who can tattoo Chinese calligraphy well, that would be an aesthetically nice tattoo that is "close enough". You just can't say it has anything to do with Bruce Lee.
  42. 3 likes
    Very quick update because I've had some success with TV drama and am quite excited. @imron, you're right: I do know plenty of the words, and as I get used to the actors' speech/accents I'm understanding more and more. @realmayo, you were right: I'm only on episode 2 and already have a decent idea of what's going on. I've gone into more detail in the listening rut thread.
  43. 3 likes
    You can pass HSK5 in a year of studying the content and tests absolutely, though as many have mentioned, you'll probably be training yourself to pass exams rather than actually have practical usage and enjoyment from the language
  44. 3 likes
    Episode 9 健在 jiàn zài alive and in good health (of an older person) 党章 dǎngzhāng party constitution 通奸 tōngjiān adultery / to commit adultery 固然 gùrán admittedly (it's true that...) 顾忌 gùjì to have misgivings / apprehension / worry / qualm / scruple 撤职 chèzhí to eliminate / to sack / to remove from office 人情世故 rénqíngshìgù worldly wisdom / the ways of the world / to know how to get on in the world 兢兢业业 jīngjīngyèyè cautious and conscientious 加点 jiādiǎn to work extra hours / to do overtime 透支 tòuzhī (bank) overdraft 顾虑 gùlǜ misgivings / apprehensions 冻结 dòngjié to freeze (loan, wage, price etc) 紧逼 jǐnbī to press hard / to close in on 回避 huíbì to shun / to avoid (sb) / to skirt / to evade (an issue) / to step back / to withdraw / to recuse (a judge etc) 梳理 shūlǐ to comb / fig. to sort out 迟早 chízǎo sooner or later 僵持 jiāngchí to be deadlocked 逮 dǎi (coll.) to catch / to seize 谅解 liàngjiě to understand / to make allowances for / understanding 善后 shànhòu to deal with the aftermath (arising from an accident) / funeral arrangements / reparations 折中 zhézhōng to compromise / to take the middle road / a trade-off / eclectic 心无旁骛 xīnwúpángwù to be focused on a single thing and not be distracted by anything else 本领 běnlǐng skill / ability / capability / CL: 項|项, 個|个 安置 ānzhì to find a place for / to help settle down / to arrange for / to get into bed / placement 偿付 chángfù to pay back 认领 rènlǐng to claim (as one's property) / to adopt (a child) / to accept (an illegitimate child as one's own) 拥护 yōnghù to endorse / to support 嫌弃 xiánqì to avoid sb (out of dislike) / to turn one's back on sb / to ignore
  45. 3 likes
    We are looking for participants to take part in a language study that takes no more than 1 hour in England. The study involves several picture-matching and sentence reading tasks in simplified mandarin Chinese. Upon finishing the tasks, you will be reimbursed £10 for your time. The candidate should be a native English speaker (aged between 18-50 yrs) and able to read fluently in simplified Chinese. If you decide to participate, please complete the language questionnaire and a quiz through the link below. You have to pass the quiz before booking a slot for the main reading tasks (venue and time flexible – the researcher may travel to you!). Link for the on-line questionnaire and quiz https://sojump.com/jq/11849383.aspx If you would like to participate or would like more information, please contact Manyun: ml633@cam.ac.uk
  46. 3 likes
    bottom left -> top left -> bottom right -> top right => 萬壽無疆 ten thousand years of boundless longevity (idiom, conventional greeting); We wish you a Happy Birthday and many more of them.
  47. 3 likes
    Episode 7 咸鱼翻身 xiányúfānshēn lit. the salted fish turns over (idiom) / fig. to experience a reversal of fortune 整顿 zhěngdùn to tidy up / to reorganize / to consolidate / to rectify 诚恳 chéngkěn sincere / honest / cordial 开除党籍 kāichúdǎngjí to expel from the Party 侵蚀 qīnshí to erode / to corrode 私欲 sīyù selfish desire 官不聊生 (a variation of the 民不聊生mínbùliáoshēng The people have no way to make a living (idiom, from Record of the Grand Historian 史記|史记) / no way of getting by ) 造反 zàofǎn to rebel / to revolt 润滑剂 rùnhuájì lubricant 导火索 dǎohuǒsuǒ fuse (for explosive) 听风就是雨 tīngfēngjiùshìyǔ lit. to believe in the rain on hearing the wind (idiom) / to believe rumors / to be credulous 狗肚子里藏不了半斤油 the closest phrase I could find was 狗肚子装不了二两油, which means can't keep a secret 尊容 zūnróng august countenance / your face (usually mocking) 症结 zhēngjié hard lump in the abdomen (in Chinese medicine) / crux of an issue / main point in an argument / sticking point / deadlock in negotiations 常理 chánglǐ common sense / conventional reasoning and morals 过桥贷款 guòqiáodàikuǎn bridge loan 不可终日 bùkězhōngrì to be unable to carry on even for a single day / to be in a desperate situation 钻营 zuānyíng toadying for personal gain / to curry favor / to study in great depth 风平浪静 fēngpínglàngjìng lit. breeze is still, waves are quiet (idiom); tranquil environment / all is quiet / a dead calm (at sea) 要职 yàozhí key job / important position 稀客 xīkè infrequent visitor 意气用事 yìqìyòngshì to let emotions affect one's decisions 争分夺秒 zhēngfēnduómiǎo lit. fight minutes, snatch seconds (idiom); a race against time / making every second count 患得患失 huàndéhuànshī to worry about personal gains and losses 隐蔽 yǐnbì to conceal / to hide / covert / under cover 靠拢 kàolǒng to draw close to 横空 héngkōng filling the atmosphere / covering the sky 顾盼 gùpàn to look around / to care for 生辉 shēnghuī to dazzle / to brighten up (a room etc) 明眸善睐,顾盼生辉 Míngmóushànlàigùpànshēnghuī to look around flirtatiously with beautiful and lively eyes
  48. 3 likes
    Yeah, that's hard. I find I get to use a lot of new vocabulary online, but some words come up so rarely that they just don't sink in. Not sure if this helps you, but I try not to stress about words I don't see or hear in context. When something new and relevant comes up, I add it to my list and study it with the incident fresh in my mind. It doesn't guarantee retention, but in my experience it's much more effective than trying to work with a new word I've never encountered in the real world. ---------------------------------------------- This past week was a weak one due to a brief recurrence of my personal issues, but I'm spending a lot more time talking to people online. I'm also smashing through my current HSK5 word list (as per above, it's 100% words I've seen/heard and matched again the HSK5 list), which in turn is helping my comprehension because I'm ticking off more and more of the words I didn't know. Yesterday I spent most of the day listening to Chinese lessons, and last night I watched some Chinese YouTube videos and chatted online until midnight. My fatigue threshold is getting higher very quickly. I'm now so familiar with how plateaus happen (or don't happen, as is actually the case) that I'm completely confident any perceived lack of progress is just an illusion. Now even my worst listening days are far from terrible, and my best days are fantastic.
  49. 3 likes
    Because there is more to Beijing than the pollution. It has good language programs, a lot of things going on culturally, all kinds of interesting opportunities, cool people... You weigh all the pros and cons, and when you're there you get used to it and take it in stride. Compare it with some other countries: why do people still move to places with devastating earthquakes/shitty public health care/a racist or sexist environment? Because those places have other things going for them that make it worthwhile to go there and just take it in stride.
  50. 3 likes
    Maybe the comparison between moving to Beijing and smoking is a good one: people tend to start when they're young and feel immortal, the first time they tried it it tasted foul and they coughed loads but they persevered and quickly found they now feel good and look cool doing it, & aren't yet prepared to worry too much about the long-term, hoping that the filters will remove most of the worst of bad stuff... and when people eventually do start to worry, they find it's harder to quit than they'd thought. Often it's having children that finally makes up their mind though.