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Showing content with the highest reputation on 10/29/2019 in all areas

  1. 3 points
    I have seen the word in fiction writing before, too. Someone should write a short story and call it《密封蜜蜂》 (The Hermetically Sealed Bee).
  2. 2 points
    That's a question for the university staff! What will you do if we say yes and they say no?
  3. 1 point
    Just ran across this new Chinese learning platform connected to the government. Haven't had a chance yet to really look at it. What do you think? http://www.chinese-learning.cn/#/web
  4. 1 point
    Thank you Imron for your comments and support throughout the year! I’d like to double my Chinese reading goals in 2020, but that seems unlikely. Who knew that gainful employment and fatherhood could be so time-consuming?
  5. 1 point
    Idioms. Ancient Poetry. What is it with these people? They look to be using existing resources - elementary school textbooks, the Putonghua Shuiping Ceshi, the accumulated literary gems of 5,000 years of history - to put together a Chinese-learning site, without any adjustment for foreign learners. There might be some useful and interesting stuff on there, but I suspect you're going to need to look for it and identify it. Also hit a registration barrier pretty soon, and noticed they've got quite a bit of work to do on translating pages to English. Might be great. Might pass into obscurity. Pop back in six months and see what they're up to. What is worth noting - iFlytek, the company credited at the bottom, seem to have deep pockets and an AI / language recognition background. If they actually throw resources at it, who knows?
  6. 1 point
    Oh, you would have passed HSK 6 - because this was back when 6 was lower intermediate, 8 was upper intermediate, and advanced was HSK 9, 10, 11. The current HSK6 supposedly corresponds roughly to the old HSK 8. Incidentally, back then, HSK9-11 was the same test, it just got progressively more difficult such that the 9s wouldn't be able to keep up and would start failing a bunch of questions earlier, and the 10s would start failing a little bit after that. If you like scifi, there's a book called 《球状闪电》 written by the same author as 《三体》which uses this word a handful of times. It also appears in 《圈子圈套》, but doesn't appear at all in any of the books by 余华 that I checked. This once again demonstrates the importance of learning things as you come across them, rather than from generic word lists, otherwise you'll be learning things that you might never see.
  7. 1 point
    That's why anyone who has a good grasp of what their Chinese level is should pay close attention to whatever class they're signing onto. I wanted to attend an "advanced" class in Beijing, at one of the private schools (that also post on this forum) through an intermediary. Imagine their surprise when I could actually form half decent sentences. Got told within hours of arriving that there'd be no point in coming to class unless I switched to a 1-on-1 class. It probably doesn't help that a lot of these "language schools" are in the business of providing a culture/linguistic EXPERIENCE as opposed to an education. Though I certainly don't blame them, as the fluency pyramid of Chinese language students flattens out A LOT when you get to the bottom. Like one of those button topped push pins you use on cork/cardboard walls. It helps if you've reached a similar degree of fluency in a second language before you even start studying Chinese. Having used Hellotalk to try and get corrections it sometimes takes more effort to get someone to correct your mistakes than it would take to just open a grammar dictionary and review a passage before you write your sentences. Sadly, I've met quite a few foreigners with "native in Chinese" on their CV. Though I must say when said tidbit is brought up it can get hilariously awkward. One time I was sitting next to someone on a plane who worked for Carrefour in China and was looking for different work/ updating his CV. Right when I glanced over to his laptop he was writing down that he was fluent in Chinese, which I immediately made remarks on and tried to have a conversation in Chinese. I, of course, didn't expect at the time "fluent" meant HSK3 with a stutter.
  8. 1 point
    Yeah, that. I sound so fluent and extremely competent in everyday situations, and then I try to do something two centimeters outside my comfort zone and it all crumbles.
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