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    somethingfunny

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    Jim

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    道艺黄帝

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Showing content with the highest reputation on 01/15/2020 in all areas

  1. 2 points
    I agree, there is little value in asking you to make a sentence with a noun, or proper noun, like “North Korea”. Because a lazy student can always just say “I like X.” But that is poor quality teaching. The teacher is thinking, “I’ve got this tool which I can always rely on which is to ask them to make a sentence with the new word.” A better teacher would have a good idea of the kind of sentence they want you to make already and choose word(s) to direct you towards that. So, better sentence generation tasks would be: 1. Use 朝鲜 and 想 to 造句子. Here the teacher wants you to make the simple sentence 我想去朝鲜. 2. Use 朝鲜 and 觉得 to 造句子. This is asking you to use the newly learnt word to express an opinion. This should remove the difficulty with the ‘making a sentence’ activity which is usually: “where do I even begin?” 3. Use 朝鲜 and 往返票 to 造句子. This is now getting more difficult. The student should easily be able to come up with a sentence in English like: “I want to buy a return ticket to North Korea.” But will then have to think carefully and sentence structure and ordering. As Weyland says, simply memorising semantic pairs is only going to get you so far. The job of the teacher is to help you integrate new vocabulary into existing schemes by carefully thinking about the sentences they want you to make. So, in conclusion, I have sympathy for your position, but I don’t think we should give up on the “making a sentence” activity just yet.
  2. 2 points
    I will grant you in my experience small group Hanyu classes are rarely inspiring or challenging in creative ways. The difficult factor usually lies in the pacing or quantity, which can be unproductive imo. That being said, your language learning is always up to you. The impotus is on you to make it meaningful. This is even more so knowing that this teacher had no history with you and could not have known your individual needs/wants. When I was given the 'make a sentence out iof every word' homework, I turned those into a story that happened to me, a dream sequence, a creative writing challenge, or even a survey to ask friends, colleagues, strangers, etc. No, it's not always easy to combine the random HSK vocabulary into one cohesive 文本, but in the end it's your learning, and you need to take control of it.
  3. 2 points
    Don't be fooled. Finnish schools were once the envy of the world, but their embrace of progressive education policy is coming to fruition and the result is a continued slip down PISA rankings. The UK, on the other hand, has embraced some aspects of traditional teaching methods that would be common place in schools in China, and they have seen their position move up recently. I'd like to know what exactly is meant by "traditional Chinese teaching methods", and how this differs from just plain "traditional teaching methods". The forefront of the educational debate in the UK is a return to certain aspects of so-called "traditional" teaching, mainly as a remedy to going too far down the progressive rabbit-hole. I wouldn't want to go to a Chinese school, but there are plenty of "traditional" schools in the UK that I would be more than happy attending. On the question of whether or not British pupils are tough enough for a Chinese school, the answer is emphatically "yes". To find out what's happening, simply google "strict schools in britain" and you'll see what our young men and women are capable of.
  4. 2 points
    I meant a component part of the first character! As written, it does say "bed" as Lu pointed out, with an extra 木 component it would be a different character, 麻, which makes a recognised word in combination with the other character which looks like 利. Is it written on a piece of fabric like a cover slip then? Can't think of any part of a bed that's known as a 床利, but there is the homophone 床笠 which means a mattress cover. Is that a possibility? The latter character of the second word is a bit rarer and the person may have written it wrong.
  5. 1 point
    Maybe a stupid idea, but this is a mock-up of how you could test the pinyin of your flashcard collection. I think it could be an interesting approach to memorizing the pronunciation behind words. You can change the buttons to whatever colour you associate with the 5 tones. And maybe as a "help", you could show the pinyin next to the character's bottom right. Just thought I'd post it here... And some other places. Otherwise, this idea would bug me to no end. So, I'd rather scream it into the void that is the internet.
  6. 1 point
  7. 1 point
    Question: Aren't you supposed to prepare the unit before you start a class? Isn't the point of having a teacher all about having someone there to correct you? So when she's telling you to "make a sentence with word A" I'm assuming she's solely doing that to figure out whether you grasp the usage of said word. If that's not the case; then such an effort takes up a lot of precious time. Studying vocab from a list, or from flashcards is not productive in itself. Memorizing words by shear repetition is one of the worst ways to go about it. You won't remember a word, or rather remember it in appropriate setting if said word/vocab doesn't have any context to latch onto. You're not a child, as such you didn't have 18 years to learn the language and learn through use an immersion. As such, creating sentences, albeit artificially, is a way to create context where non exists. In the end you'll have to ask yourself; what's more important? Active or passive vocab? Do you want to be able to use the language or merely understand it when reading. If your goal is the former, then, sadly, you'll have to put yourself in these uncomfortable situations where you're grasping at straws sometimes. Learning a language is like riding a bike; you'll never learn it unless you get rid of those training wheels that give you a deceiving sense of control. Only by making mistakes and subsequently correcting those mistakes will you be able to master a language. If you think that creating sentences from words you've learned doesn't give you context or something to latch onto; then try a different method. Why do you study Chinese? Don't you wish to better express yourself? Which means you don't properly grasp the grammar you've learned up to that point, or you should ask your teacher to focus on what you might want to say in English and let them help you in your effort to better express yourself. Also, another question; Are you a native English speaker?
  8. 1 point
    I had to use it to download a massive video file for a subtitling job and, as far as I could work out, unless you pay for the premium service they throttle the download. I was never going to cough up, so downloaded their awful client and let it trickle for about a day to get a file that i could have torrented in twenty minutes. Nuked the horrible software from orbit once the job was complete.
  9. 1 point
    Thanks, Jim! I'm a vet, and a patient ingested baits containing this active compound (everything is ok with him). Thanks!
  10. 1 point
    Contains 2% Propoxur (an insecticide I'd never heard of): https://baike.baidu.com/item/残杀威/8055399
  11. 1 point
    The time can be as short as only minutes. For example, it's fine to walk across from Shenzhen into Hong Kong, turn right around and come back. Or it's fine to cross from Zhuhai at Gongbei into Macau, turn right around and come back, getting stamped into Mainland China 5 minutes after you exited it. The border officials don't blink or give you hard looks. No length of stay stipulations at all. In point of fact, however, I usually take advantage of the exit requirement to spend a few days in someplace of interest. Kunming, where I live, is currently connected by convenient air routes to much of SE Asia. In about two hours I can be in Vietnam, Laos, Cambodia, Thailand and Burma. A little longer gets me to Malaysia and Indonesia. Tickets are cheap and this makes it attractive to explore other countries in the region in conjunction with meeting the 60-day exit requirement. Nonetheless, I wish it were every 90 days instead of every 60 days. Once one returns with a new visa stamp 盖章,it's required that you go to your local police station 派出所 and give them a xerox copy of it for their records. This lets them know that you are in compliance with the terms of your visa. It's usually fast for me now, but in the past it has meant waiting in line and spending most of an hour.
  12. 1 point
    The website horizontalhanzi.com was set up to collect commonly-confused characters Since users can contribute those they have trouble with, there's a body of user-generated "most popular" issues.
  13. 1 point
    There is gap between what you think you could and the fact, so that's why reading aloud helps you detect the disparity between your actual condition and the ideal one.One needs to read aloud to see the room of further improvement. It helps if you may get it recorded and compare it with the correct pronunciation if there is any example available. Or you could download an app where you could transform the text input into voice. So you know how it is correctly pronounced.
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