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Showing content with the highest reputation on 02/11/2020 in all areas

  1. 7 points
    Im certainly no expert, but seeing as the title reads "what do you believe", I will share my opinion based on what I saw in Hubei in the last few days. Ive never seen anything like the level to which the cities have been locked down before, it was very extreme to the point where I was wondering, why are there so many roadblocks everywhere, when nobody even wants to go outside? People have been saying a lot about how the amount of flu deaths far exceeds this virus, even if it is super contagious, no need to panic blah blah. But we all know the Chinese govt puts economic development before pretty much everything, so shutting down a whole province all the way down to the movement of people out of their neighbourhood streets onto the main streets, which will inevitably have a deep impact on the economy long term, surely indicates that this is not only a serious problem, but the govt knows just how much more serious it might become if it doesn't put measures in place. But they can't really state this outright, otherwise the whole place will go into panic mode. So yes, I personally think numbers are being underreported and downplayed, judging from the actions bring taken at street level, and to me it makes logical sense as to why.
  2. 4 points
    Why? Contraction from wild animals is plausible enough. Raise your hand if you believe the US government would admit this? I believe the death toll may be much higher than officially reported. I believe so, because China is taking this virus very seriously. My Chinese friends also remarked that there is a surprisingly (comparatively) little involvement of the military. They speculate that the last thing China wants is the virus weeping out their military. So they keep the military uninvolved as much as they can. Regarding reporting correct numbers/statistics. Truth is important, but not creating a mass panic is more important. If it takes a white lie to do so, I can accept this. From an outside perspective China is already doing as much as they can. I guess, they could not do any more if the death rate was higher than officially reported.
  3. 4 points
    Let's just assume for purposes of discussion that the outbreak did originate at that research facility in Wuhan. (Perhaps a worker there contracted the disease due to some sort of equipment malfunction not noticed at the time and unknowingly passed the disease on to the community before developing symptoms.) Raise your hand if you believe the Chinese Government would admit this, if it happened. I'm looking. Looking way way in the back, too. I still don't see any hands raised. And of course that's the point here. Maybe the Chinese Government is in fact being open and truthful with the public. But who believes that?
  4. 2 points
    Graded Watching is a website I've created to make watching Chinese TV series more approachable for Chinese learners. It offers mainly two things: a ranking based on the number of words, to find TV series at your level a list of words for each show that you can import into Pleco for studying Currently there are around 60 shows listed. I hope I can add more shows in the future, but since the analysis is done based on soft subs the selection is limited. I selected two easier shows for myself to start with, "On Children", a show on Netflix which reminds me of Black Mirror, and "Memory Love", which I use for practicing listening comprehension together with the Chrome extension Language Learning with Netflix. It will stop after each subtitle and I can check whether I understood everything. Before watching an episode I study all the words using Pleco flashcards, so I hardly need to look up anything while watching, which is very motivating. If you have soft subs for more shows I'd be happy to include them.
  5. 2 points
    Yes, that was us on the news, we are now in the milton keynes quarantine facility. Still not allowed out of our rooms, test results for the virus have apparently delayed until tomorrow. Still, its fairly nice here, and almost certainly miles better than any of the quarantine centres back in Hubei right now, so we're happy to slowly count down the days until the end of our two weeks.
  6. 2 points
    The UK tried to covered up a 1957 nuclear accident, the US tried to cover up Three Mile Island in 1979, and the USSR tried to cover up Chernobyl. What reason do people have for thinking that the PRC would be more open and honest than those three countries were?
  7. 2 points
    No, we are in Cambodia at the moment. We were supposed to head back around the 22nd, which was when uni starts up again. However, HIT have now said that the earliest they will restart is March 1, but we are to wait for a further announcement before heading back. Initially we were told that we weren't allowed to return to the campus before they gave us a solid date, but the last selection of info they sent us (along with a commitment we had to sign) said that we are not even allowed to return to China before the date they will give us. Thankfully we got close to a full refund for our flights, so we are just enjoying a slightly extended holiday with friends and family here. Judging by what I have been reading in this thread and have heard from other friends up in Harbin, it wouldn't surprise me if we end up being here quite a bit longer than an extra week! So far Cambodia only has one case, although I find that really hard to believe. The health minister here has reassured everyone that the virus won't spread, because the country is too hot and will kill the virus. It's remarkable really, especially in light of the fact that the human body is hotter than Cambodia... If/when it does spread here, I imagine we might actually be safer in China, as the healthcare system here has absolutely no way of coping with coronavirus.
  8. 2 points
    The technical term is whataboutism. Whataboutism is a propaganda technique first used by the Soviet Union, in its dealings with the Western world.[1] When Cold War criticisms were levelled at the Soviet Union, the response would be "What about..." followed by the naming of an event in the Western world.[2][3] It represents a case of tu quoque (appeal to hypocrisy),[4] a logical fallacy that attempts to discredit the opponent's position by asserting the opponent's failure to act consistently in accordance with that position, without directly refuting or disproving the opponent's initial argument. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Whataboutism Way back when, I was fascinated by mass hysteria. How could it happen? How could people believe the unbelievable? I did quite a great deal of reading. The answer I got, at the end of it all, was that people had stress in their lives. It could come from anything. And this mass hysteria was a way of releasing that stress. You take whatever you're most afraid of, accuse The Other of doing it, and proceed to shout and scream. If you can infect other people with your hysteria, this makes you feel better. Apparently it's very cathartic and stress-relieving. This also explains why people start enraged, spittle-flecked diatribes at you on the internet. If you've ever been a victim of it, you know what I'm saying. A deranged person takes out her frustration on you for everything that's wrong in her life, over some political issue. Again, catharsis. We saw this with Flora, who according to Wuhan foreigners who knew her, was a nutcase with a lot of things wrong in her life. Along came the triggering event and bam, here comes the outpouring of bile and ugliness.
  9. 2 points
    "Raise your hand if you believe the US government would admit this?" I call this The American Indian Distraction. Among the most common of Chinese propaganda techniques. You know, if you ever talk about Tibet in China, someone is sure as shootin' going to bring up 19th century treatment of American Indians. They must teach it in schools. In any event, it's question that's as irrelevant as can possibly be for the present discussion, which isn't focused on criticising China for the sake of criticising China, but asking whether in fact we can accept at face value the information being officially provided by China.
  10. 2 points
    Five minutes having a quick scout around finds this. Seems slightly more plausible to me. I'd love to see the maths on how many bodies you have to burn to match a steel mill for pollution.
  11. 2 points
    1) Nobody knows how many cases are out there. China clearly doesn't have the capacity to test everyone. It might be catching up, but you don't need to read too many reports from Wuhan to know that there could be thousands upon thousands of cases who haven't yet got near a hospital. 2) Governments tend not to deal in speculation. I think the best you'd get out of any government would be something along the lines of "We continue to assess the situation as quickly as possible." You're not going to get an official spokesperson from any country's Ministry of Health stand up and say "We don't know, but probably there are XXXX unidentified cases" for fear of "Ministry of Health: XXXX cases?" headlines. So that kind of conjecture or extrapolation gets left to... 3) Civil society - NGOs, academics. Gabriel Leung, here. That's where the really scary, and theoretical, numbers come from. But.... 4) China doesn't have much of a civil society and what it does have wouldn't comment in a case like this without Party approval, and who the hell is going to say "Yeah, that's fine, publish a worst-case scenario figure on the front page" in the middle of a national crisis. So we end up with the confirmed figures, and nothing else coming out of China. Under-reporting? Absolutely. But it's not like there are two sets of books here.
  12. 2 points
    要叫就早叫呀,刚刚说那么多废话是干嘛。 If you want to call her you should call early. Why you say so much nonsense? Sorry I am not very good at English translation. Hope this can help.
  13. 2 points
    I go for a walk every day otherwise I go crazy. Where I live is sparsely populated by Chinese standards so some days I barely see anyone. I don’t know how people I know stay inside for several days. I don’t think they even exercise inside.
  14. 2 points
    in the US seems to be mainly by Chinese themselves. 2 US-based Chinese professional organizations I'm involved with cancelled dinners 3 weeks ago and 2 weeks ago. These dinners were in the US (if Americans had done so, they would have been labeled as racist). US-based Chinese have told me they won't go to Chinese restaurants or stores (I've heard no Americans say this, although I expect many may feel this way too). Also, I believe Hong Kong is the only country with healthcare workers striking over permissive rules in letting in people from the mainland. The point is that I don't think it's racism that is driving people's action. The HKers feelings are understandable - as are others - it's an uncertain situation that scares people. It is unfortunate, but most cases are originating from China and caution is appropriate. Philadelphia just announced 7 cases. 6 had had contact with a visitor from Shanghai. There will likely be many more cases like this scattered around the globe. There are some disturbing ones as well. Over the weekend, 5 Britons were found to have acquired the virus at a ski resort in France while they met with another Briton who had visited Singapore. https://www.statnews.com/2020/02/08/who-cautions-coronavirus-transmission-could-increase-beyond-china/ I wonder how many of these indirect situations will occur. In terms of age of those most effected, data on large #s of people are unavailable. A 29 Jan study in the NEJM found that the median age of infection was 59 for the 425 first cases of the disease. While this could mean that older people become infected more easily, it could also mean that older people were in situations in which they got infected (i.e., visiting the market & in settings with lots of other adults). In addition, with these data, you'd expect at least 50% of the deaths to be in those above 59 years gold. We need to see data from more cases to more fully understand the clinical course of the disease. Yes and no. You need a certain (unknown) level of exposure to become infected. However, once you have the disease, it is self-sustaining until your immune system overcomes it. A 2nd exposure once you have the disease is unlikely to effect the course of the disease.
  15. 2 points
    Bravo! I'm so glad for you made it! You could sell the movie rights. I'll give Brad Pitt a call first thing in the morning.
  16. 1 point
    I seem to be getting dragged into more and more arguments with people who are branding conspiracies about about claiming vastly underreporting of numbers. This is both inside and outside China from average folk to media (I spoke on TV and radio) The problem is that your either a red commie if you take the side of the CPC or another conspiracy theorist if you don't (believe a cover up by the WHO etc). No point listing a pile of links but here is an example https://www.businessinsider.com/wuhan-coronavirus-75k-infected-doubling-every-64-days-lancet-says-2020-1 I think there are two aspects, one is that the evidence (for or against a cover up) is cherry picked, backed up by a highly misleading or taken out of context photo and two many people simply do not understand chinese culture why laws are in place such as that for relating to spreading of rumours, thus immediate skewing their opinion Anyway with this site, although we have our disagreements , everyone is pretty well educated and rational in putting forth their viewpoints so might be a good place to have a sensible discussion Thoughts?
  17. 1 point
    N95. Lots of people don't know how to fit the masks properly (even the "normal", surgical ones). At the airport in Shanghai I saw several people that didn't cover their nose (and some who kept lifting the mask to scratch their nose and other areas of the face). This is one of the reasons the WHO as well as many national governments recommend that those who aren't infected don't wear masks.
  18. 1 point
    To repeat, the topic at hand is whether you can believe the figures China is putting out about the virus. We're not talking about American Indians, Three-Mile Island, or even Michael Jackson or O.J.Simpson. There are people here and on other boards who have a knee-jerk reaction: whenever China seems to be discussed in an unfavourable light, they do their very best to move the conversation off the topic, usually by trying to put other countries in an unfavourable light as well. Let's keep the conversation focused on China and ignore the distracting talk.
  19. 1 point
    Not a native English speaker, but it's hard for me to tell whether or not you are being sarcastic here. To quote your first post: Seems to me you were making a point about the nature of the Chinese government, its lack of trustworthiness, as opposed to other, more honest, governments. To make the comparison with Iran or the USSR would be absurd, as they too are examples of authoritarian countries. When comparing China to a "liberal democracy", the USA obviously makes the most sense as it is the foremost representative of this category. It's the default, much like the USSR was for the "authoritarian camp" during the cold war (and China is now) and the British Empire would have been at the height of the colonial era. All of the above assumes that you intended to point out something specific about the Chinese government (or the category of governments to which it belongs). If you didn't, and basically meant "Raise your hand if you believe any government would admit this, if it happened", then I can see how the comparison seemed misplaced. (On a side note, I feel like labeling these kinds of comparisons as "whataboutism" is about as intellectually lazy as it gets, a catch-all to deflect accusations of hypocrisy and pointing out similarities between representatives of different categories, even when relevant to the discussion.)
  20. 1 point
  21. 1 point
    Amen. And why is it always America? Not once have I heard "What about the Belgian Congo?"
  22. 1 point
    That perception won’t change in our lifetime no matter what CCP do.
  23. 1 point
    @Flickserve yeah that's pretty much my view, and failure of local government but that's pretty much public knowledge The overall public perception of the Chinese government by those outside china seems pretty dire from what I can read. (forums, whatsapp groups, youtube, newspapers etc)
  24. 1 point
    Found traditional chinese subtitles, here you go: Line A, Line B
  25. 1 point
    I don't understand why people are ragging on this guy. I've met people in their 4th semester of university classes who can't express themselves nearly as well. Of course you can't learn by speaking alone but if you want to get better at expressing yourself the more you try and actually do that, the easier it will get.
  26. 1 point
    Thanks @matteo -- It sounds delicious. I will definitely try it. Your suggestion of adding some stir fried eggplant sounds good. Eggplant and tomato are a great combination. I would be tempted to use them together. Should work well with the tofu and rice. This method of making a one-dish rice-cooker meal differs a little from the method above, in that you put the more fragile ingredients in the steamer basket above the rice instead of directly onto the rice. I often take that approach too and like it very much. Appreciate you posting your recipe!
  27. 1 point
    I often cook steamed 豆腐 as a quick recipe when I feel like something simple. I find it super convenient as I put the rice in the rice cooker and just place the tofu on top, and while it goes I prepare all the other ingredients. Chances are you know it already, so I'll just outline quickly how I do it! The basic stuff: Rinse out the rice, put it in the cooker and cover with water. I use slightly more water than usual because my rice cooker is very basic, it detects the extra weight of the tofu and cooks for longer - so if you don't add a bit of extra water you risk burning the rice. If you add to much water though, you overcook the rice. Cut the tofu in big nice slices (you can skip this but then it will be much harder to share) and lay it on top in the steaming shelf. While the water is warming up, cut up a couple of tomatoes in mid-size chunks and lay them on top of the tofu. You can replace the tomatoes with a diced eggplant, but it makes for a longer recipe as it will need to be pre-cooked in a pan before steaming. Toppings: Depending on what you like and how much time you got, you can go crazy. I usually use: - fried shallots (pick two or three shallots, slice them finely - optionally mix with a bit of finely chopped ginger - and fry them in a small pan until golden and crunchy ) - finely diced cucumber - steamed veggies - stir fried garlic sprouts - stir fried eggplants How to serve it: Once ready, put the tofu and tomatoes in a saucer and dress with sesame oil and light soy sauce. Keep the rice separately and the toppings each in its small bowl. This way of serving the dish helps making it look a bit fancy even if it's actually really simple (if you do things properly, the table will be full of little cups full of colorful food), plus you can add to the rice whatever ingredient you prefer and create your own mix! Are you guys familiar with the recipe? do you have any recommendations/ things you do differently? Cheers
  28. 1 point
    You're a god in my eyes now! Sorry to see how easy "On Children" was - I had an incredibly easy time with that one and chalked it up to the study paying off 😂 Same with A Sun, which I watched earlier this week 🤣
  29. 1 point
    @Weyland Genre would be nice to have, but I don't think it's worth the effort. Usually you can guess it by the name or check the linked wikipedia page. You can sort the table by any column, while currently the majority of the shows are from Taiwan I counted more than ten shows from China which are playing in modern times with normal language. @Jan Finster Keep in mind that the list does not include the basic 1000 words which are used by more than 90% of all shows and are available in a separate list. The HSK coverage for those should be higher, although also not 100%. HSK doesn't contain words like 閉嘴. I think in general HSK vocabulary is more oriented towards written language. I would say the number of words you need to know is a good indicator for difficulty? The differences can be pretty large, especially if you look at the number of words per hour in the first four hours.
  30. 1 point
    @Tomsima I realise you went from that small city to the airport and not a tour of wuhan. But, from what you saw on your way out , how bad do you think it might be in Wuhan or in Hubei? Did you get the feeling it was worse than what we know? Your description of the hospital scene sounds like it is. Im glad you got out safely. An American colleague of mine was sucessfully evacuated with his young child a few days ago. His wife was unfortunately not elegible. She stayed behind in Wuhan 市 with her father. Her father died yesterday of the virus. He's working with the state dept to try and get her out, but for now she is in Wuhan alone. It doesnt get much more heart wrenching.
  31. 1 point
    It felt great to leave my apartment, have a walk around and breathe some fresh air after almost a week of being stuck inside. The air is noticeably fresher than usual without all the cars, and without the usual background noise of traffic and people I even managed to hear some birdsong while walking back to my apartment. The general experience of being outside, listening to the birds sing, letting the sun shine on my face and breathing in the crisp, cold air was so nice that I decided it was worth risking staying outside for a little while so that I could enjoy it for a few minutes longer. I had a funny interaction with the 保安 on the way out. As I was filling in my details, I thought he asked me about my 属性. I usually come across that word when using my computer (file "properties" etc), so I was a bit confused, and thought that maybe it was being used in regards to my status or something. A couple of sentences later and I realised he was asking about my 属相 (Chinese Zodiac) and whether or not we had this concept in my country. He then asked “你们是不是都很有钱?” followed by some comments about the strength of the mighty 英镑 (he doesn't seem to have been following the news these past 3 and a half years). I'm sure most people here have had similar conversations countless times before, and it can be a little boring to go through the same old routine, by today it felt different. With all the virus stuff turning everything upside down, it was oddly reassuring to be having one of those typical foreigner/old curious Chinese man interactions. Here's one of the temperature checking stations that have become a regular part of day to day life in China (taken at a shopping mall): Now for a little about Wechat. The screenshots below are from a popular 公众号. It basically tells you how many newly confirmed infections there have been in the city that day and who the infected are. They give a surprisingly large amount of info about each case, including the person's occupation, address, etc. The thing that seems of most interest to people is each infected person's 活动轨迹 (basically their movements before being admitted to hospital), which is set out in remarkable detail. My teacher was particularly worried when she saw that one of the infected people had eaten at a certain market on the same day she had went there with her family. You'll notice that many of the recent descriptions state 无武汉出游史, meaning they contracted the virus in Harbin, not Wuhan. There is even a map showing infected locations relative to yourself, if you really feel like scaring the bejesus out of yourself (I'm not quite surrounded by red infection marks just yet!) : I know many suspect the official figures, but in Harbin at least, things appear to be being handled with great deal of transparency. We're down to 10-20 new confirmed cases per day here, and many seem to be appearing in clusters. Today especially, many of the new infections appear to have resulted from people ignoring official advice and still getting together with extended family and friends, much to the consternation of many: The few business that remain open are trying to adapt tot he situation, as this 无接触 pizza delivery service from Pizza Hut shows. I take it that they just drop off the pizza at the entrance to your 小区. I wonder if picking up a pizza means having to use one of your exit passes? And finally, some light-hearted humour from my 朋友圈:
  32. 1 point
    With some types of food beginning to run low, I left the apartment for the first time in days this afternoon. Whenever you enter or leave the apartment complex there is a security guard who registers your name, address and telephone number. People do the usual thing of describing the exact characters that make up their name (祥瑞的瑞 etc), but being older gentlemen the security guards often don't know how to write them, so it seems that they mostly just ask people to write their details into the log themselves. I tried to keep my gloves on while jotting down mine, but it turns out that it's pretty difficult to write Chinese while wearing thick woollen gloves and also while trying to balance a clipboard on the edge of a metal railing. I ended up removing my gloves, and needless to say that I thoroughly disinfected my hands as soon as I got home. I hope others are doing the same, as everyone using the same pen can't be good for limiting cross-infection. Speaking of disinfectant, our 物业 distributed bottles to everyone last week. Someone knocked on my door while I was in the middle of taking a lesson over Wechat, and I was a little taken aback when the lady at the door quickly shoved a bottle of clear liquid into my hands and left without saying a word. You don't get many people knocking on your door in China and my mind was still on the lesson. For a few seconds I thought that the lady was a neighbour and the clear liquid was a bottle of baijiu that she was giving me as a late New Year gift. It was only when I noticed the 75% alcohol content that I got a clue that it wasn't for drinking. . They also left left some masks outside of everyone's door, so they are taking good care of us. Less fortunate are the people in the two buildings which have been completely sealed off for 14 days. Apparently, a lady returned to our apartment complex after a trip to Wuhan in late January. Unbeknown to her, she had contracted the virus and subsequently infected her adult son, who has an apartment in a different building within the same complex. Since they were confirmed as having contracted the virus last week, the two buildings have been completely sealed off, and no one is allowed to enter or leave. One of the victims lived in the same building (栋) as me, but fortunately their apartment was located in a different unit (单元 - technically the same building but different entrance, elevators etc), so I'm still free to come and leave as I wish. For the unlucky people in the quarantined 单元, they have to order supplies via the 物业. The mother and son are both in hospital, but I guess they aren't taking any risks and have decided to keep everyone they shared an entrance and lift with under lock and key. I took a look at one of the sealed properties on my way back from the supermarket and I half expected to be met with a sealed metal barrier and maybe even a soldier with a gun guarding the entrance, but all I could see from the outside was some thin barrier tape and some signs on the door: The red sign says “新型冠状病毒感染感染的肺炎 确诊病例封闭单元”. While I feel lucky now, I realise that it only takes a single instance of infection from within my unit, and then I will be a prisoner in my own apartment for the next 2 weeks.
  33. 1 point
    What an incredible story! I am glad you made it to Britain.
  34. 1 point
    Why not just answer his quite specific and well-set out questions (he even numbered them, you'll notice) on here so everyone can benefit.
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