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Showing content with the highest reputation on 02/12/2020 in all areas

  1. 5 points
    Im certainly no expert, but seeing as the title reads "what do you believe", I will share my opinion based on what I saw in Hubei in the last few days. Ive never seen anything like the level to which the cities have been locked down before, it was very extreme to the point where I was wondering, why are there so many roadblocks everywhere, when nobody even wants to go outside? People have been saying a lot about how the amount of flu deaths far exceeds this virus, even if it is super contagious, no need to panic blah blah. But we all know the Chinese govt puts economic development before pretty much everything, so shutting down a whole province all the way down to the movement of people out of their neighbourhood streets onto the main streets, which will inevitably have a deep impact on the economy long term, surely indicates that this is not only a serious problem, but the govt knows just how much more serious it might become if it doesn't put measures in place. But they can't really state this outright, otherwise the whole place will go into panic mode. So yes, I personally think numbers are being underreported and downplayed, judging from the actions bring taken at street level, and to me it makes logical sense as to why.
  2. 4 points
    To add my own two cents, to me, the extreme reaction (locking down cities etc.) seems reasonable, even if the infection numbers are exactly what they are reported to be. I've been to a few Chinese hospitals here in Chengdu before and from what I could tell they could barely cope during normal times. Although everyone says the death rate is lower than the flu, it seems clear that it's at the very least very contagious. It also seems like simply getting on a drip and being put on oxygen is enough to save most people's lives (from the limited stuff that I've read), even if they are quite sick. But imagine 500 million people get infected and flooding the hospitals. There are not enough beds and definitely not enough drips so I would guess that the death rate would sky rocket because most people wouldn't be able to receive even basic care. This is just me speculating of course. As for massive death rates and corpses being burned... Most of the university students that I teach have access to VPN's and proxies and many of them have Instagram and Facebook accounts. There are millions of Chinese people living overseas with families in mainland China. If people were dying wholesale, where are all their families and friends from other parts of China and the world who suddenly don't hear from them? Where are the photos of huge smoke plumes rising out of Wuhan? In the age of the internet I find all this hard to believe. Looking for conspiracies is a lot of fun, especially when people have been locked up at home for some time, and the (western) media is spreading terror with their "killer virus" headlines. It all seems like a bit of a far stretch, especially when there is more than enough evidence to justify more or less believing what is in front of you. As a side note, I returned to Chengdu from South Africa last week. The plane was almost completely empty and there were no lines at the airport (the best travel experience I've ever had) but the city is still relatively busy, lots of cars and people moving around, although it's very quiet at night. Lots of stores are closed but people are still ordering stuff off of Taobao and collecting packages. The hotpot restaurant next door is even still open and people are eating there. It's not all doom and gloom and military supression.
  3. 3 points
    This kind of stuff is hilarious. I had a friend posting this theory all over the place. So here's the thing. Conspiracy theories like this always make dark insinuations like this when there are really more simple answers. So first of fall, this originates from 4Chan, so that's a red flag right there. But let's think of other reasons that S02 emissions could be increasing. Things that can create SO2 emisions: burning organic waste, power plants, and industrial facilities. What contains a lot of organic waste? Medical waste. So a combination of incinerating large amounts of medical waste in combination with industry and coal burning power plants could create excessive amounts of SO2. More evidence for this fact is that the SO2 seem to be emitting from an industrial park.
  4. 3 points
    Yes, that was us on the news, we are now in the milton keynes quarantine facility. Still not allowed out of our rooms, test results for the virus have apparently delayed until tomorrow. Still, its fairly nice here, and almost certainly miles better than any of the quarantine centres back in Hubei right now, so we're happy to slowly count down the days until the end of our two weeks.
  5. 3 points
    I think investment bankers are often decent enough people but everyone knows their bonus structure gives them perverse incentives: what is in their self-interest is at odds with what's best for society. So it's largely a structural, rather than moral, issue. And I guess the same is true for Chinese officials. The incentive to hide bad news from the people and from your political bosses is huge. So I'd be surprised if the infection numbers weren't being downplayed. I mean, something like GDP data is routinely falsified and even if Beijing wanted a genuine number, it's assumed that it wouldn't be able to get one, because province level data would be falsified by local officials. So it's very likely that the same is true with virus data. And of course that's assuming this is an animal to human virus. If it's from the lab, then 889 is surely right.
  6. 3 points
    Let's just assume for purposes of discussion that the outbreak did originate at that research facility in Wuhan. (Perhaps a worker there contracted the disease due to some sort of equipment malfunction not noticed at the time and unknowingly passed the disease on to the community before developing symptoms.) Raise your hand if you believe the Chinese Government would admit this, if it happened. I'm looking. Looking way way in the back, too. I still don't see any hands raised. And of course that's the point here. Maybe the Chinese Government is in fact being open and truthful with the public. But who believes that?
  7. 2 points
    That's what it literally is, though. It's an effective tactic that works. That's why it keeps being done. It's a common demagogical trick. Aw jeez, they are the worst. Constant sanctimony. Looking down their noses at everyone. The US occupies a special place in their scorn...they get to just make things up about us. They got caught red-handed last year in a pile of ugly lies, distortions that made Americans look like monsters. Not a word of truth in any of it, and no fact-checking was done. If anyone wants to talk about lack of trustworthiness we can start right here.
  8. 2 points
    China definitely exerts strong influence on the WHO, see for example their continued efforts to keep Taiwan out of the WHO.
  9. 2 points
    Just posted on SCMP: "At least 500 hospital staff in Wuhan had been infected with the deadly new strain of coronavirus by mid January, multiple medical sources have confirmed, leaving hospitals short-staffed and causing deep concern among health care workers. While the government has reported individual cases of health care workers becoming infected, it has not provided the full picture, and the sources said doctors and nurses had been told not to make the total public. The reason for this edict was not explained, but the authorities have been trying to boost morale among frontline medical staff, especially following the death of Li Wenliang, who was killed by the disease weeks after being reprimanded by police for warning colleagues about the new virus." www.scmp.com/news/china/society/article/3050077/least-500-wuhan-medical-staff-infected-coronavirus
  10. 2 points
    "Raise your hand if you believe the US government would admit this?" I call this The American Indian Distraction. Among the most common of Chinese propaganda techniques. You know, if you ever talk about Tibet in China, someone is sure as shootin' going to bring up 19th century treatment of American Indians. They must teach it in schools. In any event, it's question that's as irrelevant as can possibly be for the present discussion, which isn't focused on criticising China for the sake of criticising China, but asking whether in fact we can accept at face value the information being officially provided by China.
  11. 2 points
    1) Nobody knows how many cases are out there. China clearly doesn't have the capacity to test everyone. It might be catching up, but you don't need to read too many reports from Wuhan to know that there could be thousands upon thousands of cases who haven't yet got near a hospital. 2) Governments tend not to deal in speculation. I think the best you'd get out of any government would be something along the lines of "We continue to assess the situation as quickly as possible." You're not going to get an official spokesperson from any country's Ministry of Health stand up and say "We don't know, but probably there are XXXX unidentified cases" for fear of "Ministry of Health: XXXX cases?" headlines. So that kind of conjecture or extrapolation gets left to... 3) Civil society - NGOs, academics. Gabriel Leung, here. That's where the really scary, and theoretical, numbers come from. But.... 4) China doesn't have much of a civil society and what it does have wouldn't comment in a case like this without Party approval, and who the hell is going to say "Yeah, that's fine, publish a worst-case scenario figure on the front page" in the middle of a national crisis. So we end up with the confirmed figures, and nothing else coming out of China. Under-reporting? Absolutely. But it's not like there are two sets of books here.
  12. 2 points
    Quite early on, I did think 100,000 infections could be possible. Some people might say a coverup. I would say, other factors also do come into account: - Mixing of people in fever clinics. - Undercounting of mild symptoms. - Lack of testing kits. - false negatives tests. - People initially negative turn positive. - Difficulty of counting with a sudden overload of healthcare system - Deaths before diagnosis confirmed - changing case definition.
  13. 1 point
    Graded Watching is a website I've created to make watching Chinese TV series more approachable for Chinese learners. It offers mainly two things: a ranking based on the number of words, to find TV series at your level a list of words for each show that you can import into Pleco for studying Currently there are around 60 shows listed. I hope I can add more shows in the future, but since the analysis is done based on soft subs the selection is limited. I selected two easier shows for myself to start with, "On Children", a show on Netflix which reminds me of Black Mirror, and "Memory Love", which I use for practicing listening comprehension together with the Chrome extension Language Learning with Netflix. It will stop after each subtitle and I can check whether I understood everything. Before watching an episode I study all the words using Pleco flashcards, so I hardly need to look up anything while watching, which is very motivating. If you have soft subs for more shows I'd be happy to include them.
  14. 1 point
    I’m in Texas now, but my thoughts are still with my friends in China, many of whom can’t leave the house freely to have a big bowl of noodles at Mister Wang’s and can’t count on the Meituan delivery guy to bring a hot box of fried chicken and corn on the cob. What to do? In thinking over my days in Kunming, when I really didn’t want to fuss with making a conventional meal, had limited ingredients, and wanted easy cleanup, I turned to the rice cooker. What a good friend the rice cooker is. No surprise that it's the first electric appliance most young Chinese buy after getting out from under Mom's wing. A one-dish meal like this is usually called 菜饭 caifan, or more specifically 电饭煲菜饭。The beauty of it is that you cook a meat and a vegetable together with the rice. Seasoning can range from minimal to exotic. Let me show you a “template” recipe today, one showing a method you can easily adapt to what you have available. Please excuse me for using photos shot when I was back in Kunming. 1. The rice I use ordinary medium-grain white rice 大米。Start by washing it gently three times, until the rinse water runs off mostly clear (no longer milky.) Cover the rice with water and let it stand most of an hour (minimum 30 or 40 minutes.) This lets the individual grains of rice swell with water and “plump up” so as to cook without falling apart. Use less water than you normally would, because the meat and vegetables contain some water that they will release while cooking. I cannot tell you exactly how much to water to use, but you won’t go far wrong if you start with about ¾ of your usual amount. 2. The meat My first choice for meat is a high-quality sausage 香肠。I avoid the stuff selling for 25 or 30 Yuan per kilo, and spring for the top of the line sausage that goes for three times that much instead. The stores I use always have at least two kinds. If you like it spicy, choose the 麻辣 mala version; if you like it gentle with a slightly sweet note, chose the 广味 guangwei (Guangdong style.) You can also use smoked sausage 熏腊肠。 Slice the sausage into thin rounds. I usually cut them on a bias, so the pieces have an oval shape with greater surface area than if they were cut straight across like a stack of coins. If you can’t get sausage, you can use Chinese ham 火腿肠 huotui chang. It’s a processed meat product, tubular like hot dogs, and quality can vary. Easy to find. Buy the good stuff. 3. The vegetable Nearly any green vegetable will do. Ask for 青菜 qingcai when shopping. It can be a leafy or non-leafy green vegetable. I often use 苦菜 kucai (slightly bitter leaf) or small cabbage 小白菜。Sometimes I use 儿菜 ercai, which works very well. Ercai is in season now, and it is what I have shown in these photos. 4. The extras I add a couple of spring onions if available, sliced fine. Use the white parts only, not the green tops. I don’t add ginger, since it won’t cook thoroughly and can give you an unpleasant surprise if you bite into a chunk of it. Finely minced garlic is optional. 5. The process Lay the thin slices of sausage on top of the rice. As the sausage cooks, the fat will drip down, seasoning the rice. My rice cooker takes 30 minutes to make plain rice. After 20 minutes, I open the lid and add the vegetables plus spring onions. Don’t need to stir them in; just lay them on top of the sausage and rice. Sprinkle some salt onto the vegetables. Close and continue cooking. It will take longer than the normal time for plain rice; usually an extra 5 to 10 minutes because the meat and vegetables have introduced extra water. When the rice signals that it is done (the rice cooker beeps) open the lid and stir it all up with chopsticks. If it still looks too wet, let it cook another 2 or 3 minutes with the lid open. A golden crust will have formed in the base of the rice cooker. This part is extra delicious. As the cook, I try to sneak a mouthful of it before serving the rest of the dish to my friends. I don’t always get away with it anymore; they watch me like a hawk. 6. Cook's tip (小提示) The most frequent place where people go wrong when making this is not letting the rice soak long enough before turning on the heat. 7. Residuals If there is any left over, it keeps well overnight in the fridge and will make a tasty lunch tomorrow. 剩菜。Just nuke it in the microwave for a short time. Nothing much to clean up afterwards. Just the rice cooker and a couple of serving bowls. It’s easy to vary a recipe like this to suit individual preferences. Hope you will try it and see what you think. Would be interested in hearing your individual variations. Also, if you have other ideas on simple meals for good home-made eats during quarantine, or semi-quarantine, please pitch in. If there are enough, we can start a new thread.
  15. 1 point
    I agree about point 1, but, if you are not in a hurry, surely statement 3 is not per se wrong. The guy, who currently posts most on the AJATT method concerning learning Japanese (Matt vs Japan), advocates such a period of silent input in order to make your ear capable of actually perceiving subtle nuances in pronunciation. He argues that your pronunciation will be better than if you had started speaking from the start (and had adopted bad habits).
  16. 1 point
    Shelley, the claypot is not the same as a tandoor. It is like a cooking pot but made of clay. The Germans have something called a Römertopf - Roman pot - that has some similarity in its effects. I did buy a Chinese clay pot once but I had no experience with it. In my memory, however, Poons served the claypot rice in small stainless steel vessel. Maybe it was taken out of the clay pot to serve. The German one is a different shape, but it has the same principle - the moisture from the cooking goes into the walls of the pot: https://pleasanthillgrain.com/romertopf-classic-clay-oval-baker-3-4-7-qts Here's a claypot you can order at Souschef: https://www.souschef.co.uk/products/chinese-clay-pot?variant=16895727566906&currency=GBP&gclid=EAIaIQobChMIjbDKs8vM5wIVybHtCh2djgKVEAQYAiABEgI8wfD_BwE abcdefg: thanks for details on the chicken dish and for the link. I must try it. Only recently Fuchsia Dunlop showed pictures on Instagram of actual salt-crust chicken and I was interested. Hers is Hangzhou. I am attaching a screenshot of Instagram - hope this is OK.
  17. 1 point
    Best solution to me : "we need to build a wall around Wuhan folks, and the coronavirus is going to pay for it!!"
  18. 1 point
    A wife doesn’t have the same enthusiasm and patience to help teach as a girlfriend does...?
  19. 1 point
    Thanks, abcdefg, that was delicious. I ate too much of it. Will try to attach a photo. I happened to be passing through Stratford (East London) where there is a branch of Loon Fung and I got some sausage and greens.
  20. 1 point
    At the senior level, UN and other multilateral organisations are extremely political. Recall that China effectively appointed the previous WHO head, Margaret Chan. News reports suggest that when the current WHO head recently held meetings in Beijing, he engaged in the oiliest of flatteries. https://www.fmprc.gov.cn/mfa_eng/zxxx_662805/t1737014.shtml
  21. 1 point
    I totally agree. It is especially western countries that very outspokenly criticize China from a hypocritical moral high ground. Before "casting the first stone", they should first self-reflect on their own short comings. It is not just the US (even though they are "loud"). And yes, I also demand this from my home country (Germany). The German media is full of know-it-all value judgments about how China handles this crisis. Recently, when China built their hospital in 7 days, they spoke of a "performance dictatorship" ("Leistungsdiktatur") and about "showing off", how efficient China was. Instead they could have reflected on the fact that Germany has been building a new airport in Berlin for 10+ years and there is no end in sight... They could self-reflect how they benefit from the Chinese "performance dictatorship", which lets them type their criticism on a 5000€ MacBook instead of on a 50000€ Comodore 64 (if computers were manufactured in Germany instead of China progress and costs would be different to what we have today). No, it is about balance! Go ahead and criticize China all you want, but do so in perspective relative to how other countries (incl. your own country) have handled similar events in the past. What is better, what is worse? Anything else is just lazy...
  22. 1 point
    To repeat, the topic at hand is whether you can believe the figures China is putting out about the virus. We're not talking about American Indians, Three-Mile Island, or even Michael Jackson or O.J.Simpson. There are people here and on other boards who have a knee-jerk reaction: whenever China seems to be discussed in an unfavourable light, they do their very best to move the conversation off the topic, usually by trying to put other countries in an unfavourable light as well. Let's keep the conversation focused on China and ignore the distracting talk.
  23. 1 point
    The UK tried to covered up a 1957 nuclear accident, the US tried to cover up Three Mile Island in 1979, and the USSR tried to cover up Chernobyl. What reason do people have for thinking that the PRC would be more open and honest than those three countries were?
  24. 1 point
    Like Roddy said, using America for the distraction is a red flag as to what's going on. Now, if you had said what about Iran (the plane that was shot down) or the USSR (Chernobyl) or Japan (Fukushima), then -- to quote you -- "I would not bring this up." But no, it's always America, isn't it.
  25. 1 point
    The technical term is whataboutism. Whataboutism is a propaganda technique first used by the Soviet Union, in its dealings with the Western world.[1] When Cold War criticisms were levelled at the Soviet Union, the response would be "What about..." followed by the naming of an event in the Western world.[2][3] It represents a case of tu quoque (appeal to hypocrisy),[4] a logical fallacy that attempts to discredit the opponent's position by asserting the opponent's failure to act consistently in accordance with that position, without directly refuting or disproving the opponent's initial argument. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Whataboutism Way back when, I was fascinated by mass hysteria. How could it happen? How could people believe the unbelievable? I did quite a great deal of reading. The answer I got, at the end of it all, was that people had stress in their lives. It could come from anything. And this mass hysteria was a way of releasing that stress. You take whatever you're most afraid of, accuse The Other of doing it, and proceed to shout and scream. If you can infect other people with your hysteria, this makes you feel better. Apparently it's very cathartic and stress-relieving. This also explains why people start enraged, spittle-flecked diatribes at you on the internet. If you've ever been a victim of it, you know what I'm saying. A deranged person takes out her frustration on you for everything that's wrong in her life, over some political issue. Again, catharsis. We saw this with Flora, who according to Wuhan foreigners who knew her, was a nutcase with a lot of things wrong in her life. Along came the triggering event and bam, here comes the outpouring of bile and ugliness.
  26. 1 point
    Amen. And why is it always America? Not once have I heard "What about the Belgian Congo?"
  27. 1 point
    Why? Contraction from wild animals is plausible enough. Raise your hand if you believe the US government would admit this? I believe the death toll may be much higher than officially reported. I believe so, because China is taking this virus very seriously. My Chinese friends also remarked that there is a surprisingly (comparatively) little involvement of the military. They speculate that the last thing China wants is the virus weeping out their military. So they keep the military uninvolved as much as they can. Regarding reporting correct numbers/statistics. Truth is important, but not creating a mass panic is more important. If it takes a white lie to do so, I can accept this. From an outside perspective China is already doing as much as they can. I guess, they could not do any more if the death rate was higher than officially reported.
  28. 1 point
    Yes, that's exactly what I did. All my stuff is still in my Kunming apartment. Even carried my bike up four flights of stairs so it would be safe. Hope to return during the second half of April. Will reevaluate the actual date as it gets closer.
  29. 1 point
    Use the translated English lyrics below to find the title and artist of the song. Bonus points for providing a video or audio link. A short audio clip is provided as an additional hint, should you need it. I was born in a small northern town, by the banks of the serene Chaobai River To commemorate her tranquility, my name is Peace Spring wavering between warm and cold, sparrow flies over open country White snow quietly melts, my name is Peace When I was 18, I departed from her gaze Came to a strange city, maybe I’ll never go back In a spring wavering between warm and cold, sparrow flies over open country Fly to a strange city, my name is Peace My name is Peace, in this strange world It turns out the world is vast and expansive, no way to see its edges People drift further and further apart, hearts become ice-cold and apathetic I found my beloved, now I’ll never go back I told her my name, my name is Peace My name is Peace, in this unpeaceful world Hope you find happiness in the city, find happiness Hope you find happiness in the city, find happiness clip.mp3 Answer
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