Jump to content
Chinese-forums.com
Learn Chinese in China

Featured

  1. Tomsima

    Tomsima

    Members


    • Points

      16

    • Content Count

      859


  2. 889

    889

    Members


    • Points

      4

    • Content Count

      3,922


  3. roddy

    roddy

    Administrators


    • Points

      2

    • Content Count

      20,455


  4. imron

    imron

    Administrators


    • Points

      1

    • Content Count

      13,202



Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation on 02/13/2020 in all areas

  1. 8 points
    update from quarantine here: - first lab test results are back, and the whole group has tested negative, which is obviously great news. - were going to be tested again this saturday, then again two days before the 14 day period is up, because apparently some symptomless carriers don't show up on early tests. - i am closing in on completing my written memorisation of 千字文, I have written it out so much now I am starting to really hate it…which is always a good sign, shows I'm definitely reciting it enough - hit the 30 mark for classical poems learnt by heart… - so bored ive ordered a neo geo to the quarantine centre so i can play metal slug. I literally never get bored of studying, but damnit if my brain doesn't need to unwind sometimes
  2. 4 points
    I really wish I had been a bit braver and subtley taken some videos, because it really was so surreal. When we were indoors for those few weeks, despite reading all the shocking social media posts, I really didnt expect anything once we were outside, and tbh once we were off our little alley and onto the main road, it really wasnt anything remarkable, just an empty street (although that is fairly remarkable in china i guess). It all got all bizarre and apocalyptic-like once we had to go to the centre of town, where all the govt buildings and hospitals are. As long as you were on foot and passed the temp check, police were letting anyone walk in and out of the areas cordoned off to cars in the city centre. In two hours we must have seen around 20 people in total, mostly queueing up to scream at govt officials who were locked in rooms with an open window to talk to people about whatever problems they were having. We had to go into the hospital body check area, and thats when it got scary, bad timing on our part I suppose: we were being tested by a guy in a hazmat in one of those outside tents when a man started hysterically screaming at a doctor across the road from us. Then an ambulance pulled up and a bunch of doctors jumped out in a panic and started unpacking coolers and boxes with blood on them. We immediately jogged off without trying to look in a panic ourselves. It was one of those moments where you just kind of look at everything as if you arent really there, almost like it was too weird to really be happening. Presumably large parts of Wuhan, Yichang, Huanggang, Jingzhou etc. are the same right now, ie. understaffed and overinfected. I would hazard I guess that many people living in Hubei dont know what its like outside because they haven't been outside nor do they want to. The only people that are outside are those who absolutely have to be out for some emergency reason, causing a concentration of panicked people to all be congregating in one place. edit: added a photo I took of one of the 'windows' where people were shouting, this one was for applying for the 通行证 permit that would get you out of town. Also added one of the many signs up at the entrance to every road
  3. 2 points
    The more I think about it, the more I think Taiwan. I Google searched to confirm my assumption: Hiking, mountain biking, surfing, diving, Chinese. Some climbing, but maybe not very much. And the place is small enough, and the transport good enough, that getting between all these activities shouldn't be that hard.
  4. 2 points
    祿 lu "prosperity" Just for the record, since this comes up a lot, there are four auspicious characters commonly used on jewelry and such: 福 fu "good fortune" 祿 lu "prosperity" 壽 shou "longevity" 喜 xi "happiness" And if you find a mark on the base of your made-yesterday vase, it probably reads 乾隆年製 Qianlong nian zhi "Made in the Reign of Qianlong."
  5. 2 points
    Yes, that was us on the news, we are now in the milton keynes quarantine facility. Still not allowed out of our rooms, test results for the virus have apparently delayed until tomorrow. Still, its fairly nice here, and almost certainly miles better than any of the quarantine centres back in Hubei right now, so we're happy to slowly count down the days until the end of our two weeks.
  6. 1 point
    something along the lines of, "when the cart reaches the mountain, a road will surely be there to take", as in 'we can worry about that when we get there', reassurance that things will work out in due course
  7. 1 point
  8. 1 point
    Pleased to hear it. BTW your earlier report of the outside of the hospital, people screaming and boxes with blood slopping remains the most vivid, and disturbing, discription I've come across in all that I've read about this disaster so far. Others I know in Wuhan/Hubei are just hunkered down - and trying to persuade me to wear a mask in London.
  9. 1 point
    Alex Lam, a journalist with Apple Daily, reports that China has changed its definition of "confirmed case" in the past few days: those who test positive but have no symptoms are no longer considered a "confirmed case." http://twitter.com/lwcalex/status/1226840055869632512 A reminder that when dealing with statistics, definitions count as much as abstract "accuracy."
  10. 1 point
    Im certainly no expert, but seeing as the title reads "what do you believe", I will share my opinion based on what I saw in Hubei in the last few days. Ive never seen anything like the level to which the cities have been locked down before, it was very extreme to the point where I was wondering, why are there so many roadblocks everywhere, when nobody even wants to go outside? People have been saying a lot about how the amount of flu deaths far exceeds this virus, even if it is super contagious, no need to panic blah blah. But we all know the Chinese govt puts economic development before pretty much everything, so shutting down a whole province all the way down to the movement of people out of their neighbourhood streets onto the main streets, which will inevitably have a deep impact on the economy long term, surely indicates that this is not only a serious problem, but the govt knows just how much more serious it might become if it doesn't put measures in place. But they can't really state this outright, otherwise the whole place will go into panic mode. So yes, I personally think numbers are being underreported and downplayed, judging from the actions bring taken at street level, and to me it makes logical sense as to why.
  11. 1 point
    Just posted on SCMP: "At least 500 hospital staff in Wuhan had been infected with the deadly new strain of coronavirus by mid January, multiple medical sources have confirmed, leaving hospitals short-staffed and causing deep concern among health care workers. While the government has reported individual cases of health care workers becoming infected, it has not provided the full picture, and the sources said doctors and nurses had been told not to make the total public. The reason for this edict was not explained, but the authorities have been trying to boost morale among frontline medical staff, especially following the death of Li Wenliang, who was killed by the disease weeks after being reprimanded by police for warning colleagues about the new virus." www.scmp.com/news/china/society/article/3050077/least-500-wuhan-medical-staff-infected-coronavirus
  12. 1 point
    in the US seems to be mainly by Chinese themselves. 2 US-based Chinese professional organizations I'm involved with cancelled dinners 3 weeks ago and 2 weeks ago. These dinners were in the US (if Americans had done so, they would have been labeled as racist). US-based Chinese have told me they won't go to Chinese restaurants or stores (I've heard no Americans say this, although I expect many may feel this way too). Also, I believe Hong Kong is the only country with healthcare workers striking over permissive rules in letting in people from the mainland. The point is that I don't think it's racism that is driving people's action. The HKers feelings are understandable - as are others - it's an uncertain situation that scares people. It is unfortunate, but most cases are originating from China and caution is appropriate. Philadelphia just announced 7 cases. 6 had had contact with a visitor from Shanghai. There will likely be many more cases like this scattered around the globe. There are some disturbing ones as well. Over the weekend, 5 Britons were found to have acquired the virus at a ski resort in France while they met with another Briton who had visited Singapore. https://www.statnews.com/2020/02/08/who-cautions-coronavirus-transmission-could-increase-beyond-china/ I wonder how many of these indirect situations will occur. In terms of age of those most effected, data on large #s of people are unavailable. A 29 Jan study in the NEJM found that the median age of infection was 59 for the 425 first cases of the disease. While this could mean that older people become infected more easily, it could also mean that older people were in situations in which they got infected (i.e., visiting the market & in settings with lots of other adults). In addition, with these data, you'd expect at least 50% of the deaths to be in those above 59 years gold. We need to see data from more cases to more fully understand the clinical course of the disease. Yes and no. You need a certain (unknown) level of exposure to become infected. However, once you have the disease, it is self-sustaining until your immune system overcomes it. A 2nd exposure once you have the disease is unlikely to effect the course of the disease.
  13. 1 point
    You referring to me? Did I really help. If so, glad it did so. I also studied epidemiology and public health at postgraduate which helps quite a bit filtering through the mass of information that comes out.
  14. 1 point
    I wonder if that video is genuine though, it seems a bit choreographed.
  15. 1 point
    Are you referring to the article posted on LinkedIn? The only xenophobic episode he describes is But there are plenty of reasons a buffet restaurant might be empty. It might have failed a health inspection, closed for renovation, or there may have been a sudden dip in quality. His evidence is completely anecdotal and secondhand. He states clearly toward the end of the article that he hasn't lived in the US for two decades, so he hasn't been observing things on the ground. Besides this, the author doesn't cite where he's seeing "vicious, political, xenophobic racist attacks and smearing of all things China". If he's talking about mainstream media, it's not there. The headlines over here have been dominated by impeachment fallout and the Democratic Party nomination process. Coronavirus is not a big threat here and the coverage is brief and light on details. For the most part, reports haven't talked much about the inadequacy of the Chinese government's response until the death of the whistleblower doctor. It is somewhat possible that I live in a media bubble, so if there really are racist attacks on Chinese people in American mainstream media right now, I would like specific examples pointed out to me.
×
×
  • Create New...