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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation on 02/14/2020 in all areas

  1. 5 points
    update from quarantine here: - first lab test results are back, and the whole group has tested negative, which is obviously great news. - were going to be tested again this saturday, then again two days before the 14 day period is up, because apparently some symptomless carriers don't show up on early tests. - i am closing in on completing my written memorisation of 千字文, I have written it out so much now I am starting to really hate it…which is always a good sign, shows I'm definitely reciting it enough - hit the 30 mark for classical poems learnt by heart… - so bored ive ordered a neo geo to the quarantine centre so i can play metal slug. I literally never get bored of studying, but damnit if my brain doesn't need to unwind sometimes
  2. 4 points
    Not exactly. When I memorized it orally I did it by breaking the text into five section, then did a memory palace for each and completed the text in about 2 months roughly from what I remember. But I noticed that once I didnt have time to do daily recitations in the morning, the memory of what characters I was saying, then the meaning and precise tones all faded relatively quickly, only leaving behind vivid memories of the stories and locations in the memory palace. This was really different to when I learnt Sanskrit about 15 years ago, where I sat with a pandit every morning and recited texts by rote for months on end. It was a pretty excruciating process, but to this day I can still recite verses in Sanskrit that I haven't practiced for years, and remember their meaning. I decided to try going back to this rote method to do the written memorisation of 千字文. Im doing the same with the classical poetry too, and have found that in both instances the results have been great. Slow, yes, time-consuming, yes, but definitely doing the job of going deep into my long term memory. In my opinion, you have to think about why you are memorising something: is it for a competition or performance coming up? Memory palaces, mnemonics, all very effective for time-constrained learning. But what if you just want to remember lots of texts/one really long text off by heart, to be able to recall at any moment for the rest of your life? No time constraints? I can only say I have found that, for me, the only thing that really sticks long term in this kind of way is rote recitation and repetition. It is the only method which actually takes in every little detail of the text and sears it into your memory. You can be kinder about the process and split up the text into manageable bitesize chunks, but you cannot let any mistakes slide: one stroke out of place? Back to the beginning. I couldnt recommend it as a good study technique as it isnt 'fun' and certainly requires more time than other methods, but personally I believe it is the most effective way to memorise. It unfortunately requires a lot of discipline too - as I said in my earlier post, once you start disliking the text and you cant get it out of your head, you know its working…
  3. 4 points
    This is why we never let you place the bets, @roddy
  4. 3 points
    The Brain That Changes Itself: Stories of Personal Triumph from the Frontiers of Brain Science, Norman Doidge 😀
  5. 3 points
    I'm reading a terror novel called 玛格丽特的秘密. Someone's old family home in China has an old artifact from France that dates back to the time when there were a lot of beheadings is going on, including with the guillotine, and there is a beuatiful evil spirit who has an interest in heads (头颅). The book starts out on April fool's day (愚人节) in 2005. If I finish this one it will be book number seven.
  6. 3 points
    I really wish I had been a bit braver and subtley taken some videos, because it really was so surreal. When we were indoors for those few weeks, despite reading all the shocking social media posts, I really didnt expect anything once we were outside, and tbh once we were off our little alley and onto the main road, it really wasnt anything remarkable, just an empty street (although that is fairly remarkable in china i guess). It all got all bizarre and apocalyptic-like once we had to go to the centre of town, where all the govt buildings and hospitals are. As long as you were on foot and passed the temp check, police were letting anyone walk in and out of the areas cordoned off to cars in the city centre. In two hours we must have seen around 20 people in total, mostly queueing up to scream at govt officials who were locked in rooms with an open window to talk to people about whatever problems they were having. We had to go into the hospital body check area, and thats when it got scary, bad timing on our part I suppose: we were being tested by a guy in a hazmat in one of those outside tents when a man started hysterically screaming at a doctor across the road from us. Then an ambulance pulled up and a bunch of doctors jumped out in a panic and started unpacking coolers and boxes with blood on them. We immediately jogged off without trying to look in a panic ourselves. It was one of those moments where you just kind of look at everything as if you arent really there, almost like it was too weird to really be happening. Presumably large parts of Wuhan, Yichang, Huanggang, Jingzhou etc. are the same right now, ie. understaffed and overinfected. I would hazard I guess that many people living in Hubei dont know what its like outside because they haven't been outside nor do they want to. The only people that are outside are those who absolutely have to be out for some emergency reason, causing a concentration of panicked people to all be congregating in one place. edit: added a photo I took of one of the 'windows' where people were shouting, this one was for applying for the 通行证 permit that would get you out of town. Also added one of the many signs up at the entrance to every road
  7. 2 points
    Thank you for your updates. The details you provide on your situation and hearing about your feelings makes your posts particularly interesting. Please keep posting (I expect many would agree with me).
  8. 2 points
    If you have something else ready to go, there's also no harm in putting your current book down and starting on something else. It's a judgement call as to when to do this for a book, and when to keep going. If it was me, I would put it down if it got to the point where I was dreading, or otherwise putting off and procrastinating reading. You can always come back to the book later once you are more comfortable reading novels and have a higher vocabulary. The book has been around for a long time, and it not going anywhere.
  9. 1 point
    Homework doesn't count against reading. Keep doing your homework. Likewise, having an English novel going shouldn't have an impact because it's not introducing a large amount of unknown Chinese vocabulary. For the others I'd probably drop back and just focus on one of them - the visual novel, the San Mao articles, a novel on your phone, or 家. As your reading skill and vocabulary improves, you can branch out in to multiple texts at once, but when you're just starting out with longer texts you'll have an easier time and make more progress by focusing on one thing at a time.
  10. 1 point
    See the gamer translation of "hardcore" https://baike.baidu.com/item/硬核/22543671 has made its way into the mainstream with news stories about the more severely worded propaganda banners springing up during the epidemic, e.g. https://news.163.com/20/0214/00/F5ABNRFH0001899O.html
  11. 1 point
    English or Chinese or a mix? If it's all Chinese, I'd drop back to focus on just a single one at a time. The main reason is that you'll benefit from a single book by a single author having a narrower set of frequently used words that you don't know. As you learn those words, it will make the rest of the book easier. The same is true of each book individually, but when you are reading them all at once then you'll have 5 different sets of frequently used words, with maybe not so much overlap. And so you'll encounter a larger number of unknown words, and that will make reading more laborious. This problem will gradually go away, as you read more and increase your vocabulary, but when you first start reading books, the phenomenon will be very pronounced.
  12. 1 point
    People here often say "we'll cross that bridge when we come to it", I think the meaning is comparable - although the "everything is going to be fine" part is less emphasized!
  13. 1 point
    something along the lines of, "when the cart reaches the mountain, a road will surely be there to take", as in 'we can worry about that when we get there', reassurance that things will work out in due course
  14. 1 point
    It's impossible in a short reply to summarise the outdoor activities, hiking especially, that Hong Kong offers. Just put "Hong Kong Hiking" into Google Images for loads of enticing photos, then do a regular Google Search for loads of websites. The Government Country Parks website is dry, but complete (you'll see there are mountain bike trails, marine parks, camping sites, etc.). https://www.afcd.gov.hk/english/country/cou_vis/cou_vis.html Many activities are in the New Territories, very convenient for day trips from Shenzhen. (For reasons of geography, Shenzhen doesn't offer anything like the sort of outdoor activities Hong Kong offers.) (Hiking in particular can be dangerous on some trails if you're not prepared. Note the "High risk locations" on that website.)
  15. 1 point
    CNKI is the one I think of, but there are people on here who might have other ideas.
  16. 1 point
    Yes, that was us on the news, we are now in the milton keynes quarantine facility. Still not allowed out of our rooms, test results for the virus have apparently delayed until tomorrow. Still, its fairly nice here, and almost certainly miles better than any of the quarantine centres back in Hubei right now, so we're happy to slowly count down the days until the end of our two weeks.
  17. 1 point
    Hello Everyone! I am from the USA and applying for CSC Type A hoping to get a Master's Degree in China Studies. I was pre-admitted to Tsinghua University before the Spring Festival Holiday and now working on my application for CSC. Best of luck to everyone!
  18. 1 point
    CSC Scholarship Process 2020 Step 1: Find University and Program (http://www.campuschina.org/universities/categories.html) Step 2: Complete Online Application (https://studyinchina.csc.edu.cn/) Step 3: Fill University Form (if required) Step 4: Pay Application fee (if required) Step 5: Print Application Step 6: Prepare Required Documents Step 7: Send Documents to university (if required) Note: Acceptance letter is not mandatory but helpful in some universities, you can apply without acceptance letter. For detailed process you can find more information on official website http://www.campuschina.org/
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