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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation on 03/12/2020 in all areas

  1. 3 points
    Well my hospital appointment has been canceled, a phone call early this morning from the hospital. They said it was because of contingency plans. Not sure what they are, was not awake enough to ask more questions. I don't actually mind, I was more concerned about going to a very large hospital with thousands of people where there has been at least one confirmed case and critical care ward closed for 2 weeks. So 2 days of unexpected time to catch up on some chinese studies or crafting or maybe even some house work.
  2. 3 points
    Thank you all for your kind wishes. I am sort of keen to just get it over but wouldn't mind at all if they canceled it for another month. I feel in a months time we will know just how bad it is/will be. At the moment we are all sort of trying to ignore it and get on with normal life and I think that maybe a dangerous thing. My opinion is we should be bolting the stable door now. Bite the bullet, close the country, take all precautions and ride out the worst in relative isolation to stop the virus in its tracks. 4 to 6 weeks of shut down as opposed to 3 months or more of a dragged out war of attrition.
  3. 1 point
    Here we ran out of toilet paper, baked beans, eggs, vegetable oil, bread and tinned tuna. Oh and hand sanitizer and face masks are a given -none to be had anywhere, signs in shops declaring as much. Mind you still had one lady come in and ask as I was buying something else, every one wondered if she couldn't read.
  4. 1 point
    What about bleach? Cleaning alcohol? The U.K. had a run on toilet paper. Shelves empty and panic buying. It seems funny to me that toilet paper became the thing to panic buy. In China many Chinese people were buying oil, flour and rice. Foreigners I knew who stocked up big time were all about canned goods. No one was like “I need to make sure I have enough toilet roll to build a small fort around my toilet”. My parents were told on Sunday by friends that the local supermarket was out. They went Monday morning to find it bursting with stock.
  5. 1 point
    Oh, that was the state of information in Germany all along. But other scientists criticized that the scientists from this paper had not spoken with the Chinese lady who was the carrier. They just assumed that she was fine, when in fact she told other scientists that she did feel unwell at the time her colleagues caught the infection from her.
  6. 1 point
    Avoid taking elevators. I haven’t used our apartment building’s in a month with the exception of hauling those water cooler bottles of water up to my place. I’m only on the 6th floor luckily but my friend who is back at work in an office walks up to the 12th floor. Good exercise. No need to worry about touching buttons 😃
  7. 1 point
    Interesting text with great graphs: https://medium.com/@tomaspueyo/coronavirus-act-today-or-people-will-die-f4d3d9cd99ca
  8. 1 point
    It’s so sad to hear about this. We have had poor advice about not wearing a mask unless you are ill and now many non-Asians think people in asia are over reacting. Singapore is the exception but only when your whole population and leaders are on the same wavelength. In HK, it’s the non-Chinese who do not wear masks (I.e. Caucasians) but they also reason if everyone else is wearing a mask, then there is enough herd immunity. People deliberately not wearing masks do have a mentality of “I am smarter than the rest of them” and also refusal of succumbing to ‘herd mentality’. Unfortunately, they become too stubborn to later alter their behaviour when the situation changes. Good question. Some strategies that people in Hong Kong. - Use a tissue to open doors. Use the same tissue to open other doors or press lifts. Throw tissue away and then use hand sanitizer (aim to decrease viral load). - open a door with your feet - if a door is closing, put out your foot to stop it closing and then push it open with your foot. You won’t need to use you hand to touch it. - put a clear plastic sheet over keyboards. You can still type, just a bit slower. Plastic sheets are easier to clean - carry a little spray with alcohol. You can spray suspicious surfaces with it and then use tissue to wipe it. Throw away tissue afterwards. - Prepare a mat outside your home, have it soaked with disinfectant and step on it with your shoes before going inside. - wipe down toilets seats and close the lid when flushing. Coronavirus stays in faeces and water droplets splash up in the air when flushing the toilet. - use a key to press a lift button (small surface area, key can be cleaned easily). Yup. It does sound a bit weird but it seems to work. There are more outlandish ones but these described are habits that can done easily. Remember that you aim to decrease virus numbers as nothing can be 100% out in the community. Anybody who stayed in mainland China have any other suggestions?
  9. 1 point
    Agree on the judgement on this author. I read (in English) the first chapter of the tree body problem trilogy. I found it an incoherent jumble of pseudo-scientific garbage loosely pasted together by an array of either flat or stereotypical characters. By the end of it I didn't care about them, or the destiny of the universe. Curious to know if someone out there has a completely different opinion about it, also given that this book seems to have been quite successful.
  10. 1 point
    Finished reading 流浪地球 and was horribly disappointed. Felt that 刘慈欣 has poor understanding of humans, which, despite his excellent descriptions of time and space, ruined the story for me. I've never seen an author whose characters were flat to the point of showing no development despite aging from a small child to an older father. Nonetheless, I will swing back around to 三体 in the future. Currently reading 嫌疑人X的献身 by 东野圭吾, a Japanese mystery novel. Only about 20 pages in so far but am thoroughly enjoying it. The characters are all dynamic with complex emotions and lives.
  11. 1 point
    Good luck Shelley. It's better to get it done sooner before hospitals get innundated.
  12. 1 point
    I did the same in the US on a train. I was the only one on the train with a mask. However, a woman sitting next to me on the trained leaned away the whole time. When I went to get off the train, someone asked if I was infected or they were. This said, wearing a mask isn't an option for most Americans because they are unavailable. Even simple masks sold in paint stores have been bought out. N95s were invented by the West and the right design for a person can fit their Western or Asian face. At US companies, they "fit test you" and also do a medical evaluation before allowing you to use one (respirators impact blood pressure and respiration, so we're tested to see if we're healthy enough to use one) https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1858664. With both flu and with this virus, we don't know the relative importance of inhaled versus the risk from touching your mouth, nose, & eyes. When this pandemic began, I told friends about the fact that medical masks are designed to protect others from your infection, whereas an N95 is designed to protect you. However, this credible study from the J. of the Amer Med Assoc suggests these masks provide similar protection in health care situations from the flu: https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/fullarticle/2749214 (even after reading this, I still would use an N95 if available) It may be that small droplets are relatively rare and that a medical mask protects you by keeping you from touching yourself and by stopping large droplets. Reducing rates of infection will flatten out the rate of new infections and this reduces the likelihood of overwhelming health care. If controls are really good, the r-value will be pushed below 1 and the pandemic will stop. The level of control is based on the cumulative result of everything that is done. China is controlling the risk and is doing so thru extensive use of masks. Friends in China and my company's sites there are giving employees 1 or 2 masks/day. This is much more contagious than the flu, so hand washing is likely not enough. Eventually, I expect most of the rest of the world will move to using masks because just having everyone stay home isn't an economically viable approach.
  13. 1 point
    I mean, in a class of 12-18 students this seems pretty normal. You normally have to answer questions in a class. You also normally need to do tasks in class. In China most of the communication is teacher-student with little pair or group practice. This does mean there is usually less chance to practice. However, from the teachers perspective you standing up and doing it is part of your practice. Lots of these Chinese language programs just require money to get in. Especially at lower levels some students just come for a semester or two with their University. It’s often free for them (parents or Uni) and they don’t really care. I found this to be the case at lower levels especially. Lots of students don’t do the homework, don’t practice, they’re just there for fun. I myself would find this very frustrating. I am not surprised she pulls them up for not doing homework and agree completely. Especially if the homework is relevant for the class. Calling them lazy... well perhaps that is just a Chinese way of motivating or shaming kids to do work. At least it shows they care and aren’t just letting students do what they want (which many of my teachers did). I don’t know any classes where you don’t have to answer questions in class. How can this even work?? In fact, even if you do private classes as suggested above you’ll probably be answering more questions and speaking more in front of others as student numbers are less! It sounds like you might just be embarrassed answering in Front of a lot of people or worried about getting it wrong. If so, a one on one would work but ... you’re the only one there! If you don’t answer questions you’ll just be listening to someone talk for an hour. That might be ok (but not really) for a University lecture but not great for language learning. So overall... I’d recommend self study as the only way for you. That way no one will ask you anything, you won’t need to answer any questions at all, you can do lots of homework (really it would all be homework) and there won’t be any tasks or standing in front of anyone.
  14. 1 point
    BLCU should be one of the best or at least they have a reputation to uphold. Public speaking is rated as one of the worst experiences. But it forces you to practice speaking out loud and pay attention to what you speak when you prepare. Even in postgraduate education, we are required to speak, ask and answer questions in front of class and discussion groups. I see no difference in a class in front of a Professor from Harvard compared to a professor from BLCU except we don't need to stand up to speak. I have to agree with Shelley on the teacher commenting on people not doing their homework. Why are people paying for an education that they don't do? If it's too hard, then perhaps drop back a level. Telling people that they are lazy is the Chinese way - short, sharp and direct to the point. This is their version of EQ. It works for some personalities but not others. Personally it's not for me. I can be quite sarcastic with my tuition to postgraduates ... in a helpful way of course. LOL.
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