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Showing content with the highest reputation on 06/09/2021 in all areas

  1. I started studying Chinese as a hobby 4 years ago when I turned 30. As someone who lives in the US, is married and has a full time job completely unrelated to languages, I had always mentally toyed around with the idea of taking a "sabbatical" for a year and studying in China for a few months...although never in a serious way. Last December, I randomly decided to see if I could take advantage of the fact that covid was making a lot of Universities and programs rethink about having remote offerings, and found Tsinghua University's IUP program. I attended class from January through
    13 points
  2. For me, absolutely. I'm lucky enough to be at a point in my life where the high cost was not a real factor, and I specifically wanted a serious program that I could use to "go hard" in Chinese for a period of time. This program provided what I wanted. I am considering continuing at a significantly lower cadence in the Fall, but we will see how things pan out with returns to offices, etc. I think it was about 16 weeks. Sure - you can always organize anything yourself. However... 1. As @roddy pointed out, the time cost of organizing multiple teachers, c
    5 points
  3. Yeah I'm waiting for my HSK 2 and HSK 3 results and I'll write a proper write up... then begin the next challenge, I learn easier/better/faster with competition and tight deadlines!
    4 points
  4. A good choice is Chinese Collocation Assistant,: http://cca.xingtanlu.cn/ It is a free online collocation search website just released. The target users are L2 Chinese learners. Collocations are extracted from over 100 Chinese textbooks and Chinese Wikipedia corpus. Context sentences for each collocation are given and searching results can be ranked by their frequency.
    3 points
  5. I don't think so. Wish it were. Most of the classes I've taken have approximately followed the pattern of: 1. Brief preview of today's new material 2. Tackle the process of learning the new material, with explanation, discussion, exercises and practice. 3. Brief summary/review of what was learned, with homework designed to re-enforce the new material. I have usually urged and exhorted my teachers to spend time at the very beginning of each session reviewing key parts of what went before. That helped me a lot, making it less likely that things would just go in one ear
    2 points
  6. I am not the best person to ask as I learnt both Chinese (first) and Japanese (afterwards) in a rather unorganized way. But I can now read easy Japanese novels. What worked well for me was the Chinese textbook set 新标准日本语, which exists at the beginner, intermediate and advanced level. It comes with an exercise book 同步练习, which I found useful and which also has extra audio recordings. The book is made for self-study and quite comprehensive, the texts are reasonably interesting (sometimes there were quite a lot of business related dialogues; sometimes you wondered why they talk so much a
    2 points
  7. Going to put that on a t-shirt. I suspect organising that much tuition, in that short a space of time, would be pretty challenging. I don't think I'd want to do it all with one tutor (and would they want to do it with me), but then you have to coordinate across classes... I understand the price concerns, but I can see advantages to just having it all sorted out. There's an option 4: It's really easy that way.
    2 points
  8. I find it strange that you find this strange. A person's passive vocabulary (the words you can understand but can't come up with when speaking) is always bigger than the active vocabulary (the ones you can use while speaking) and all words will usually first become passive vocabulary and only then through repeated exposure slowly turn into active vocabulary. This is how it works for me based on my experiences learning English, Swedish, and Japanese to fluency (and forgetting Swedish for not using it for 20 years 😅). I first heard about Dr. Krashen about a year ago. For some re
    1 point
  9. Haha, good questions I actually have historically written a decent number of essays - for my previous teacher, I wrote approximately 1 essay per week as homework. Additionally, I have used "HelloTalk" as a bit of a blog where a few times per week I would post various essays I would write. I used minimal to no google translator for this course. Since I was doing this for my own growth, and not for a grade, forcing myself to type essays was part of the learning. This actually helps the teachers identify common, repeat errors (those that are ingrained and need to be corrected). D
    1 point
  10. Correct. Distinguishing between ン and ソ is tricky for beginners. (It threw me for a loop when I was learning Japanese.) I agree. The important thing here is that kanji are pronounced differently in different words. I think the best way to learn kanji and their pronunciations is not to memorize one kanji and all of its pronunciations. (I believe 生 has 16 different pronunciations in Japanese.) Learn them word by word rather than pronunciation by pronunciation. My method is to choose a kanji, pick one of its meaning, then write it in a sentence. One of the most commonly seen
    1 point
  11. Set yourself a forfeit/punishment if don't do your homework. Tip your teacher. No beer for a week. No TV until H/W is done. Whatever you feel is appropriate for your situation, and likely to actually motivate you.
    1 point
  12. iTalki does those. https://www.italki.com/languagechallenge
    1 point
  13. IMO this is by far the most efficient way to use class time, and I don't think it's even close. You pay by the minute for time with your teacher, so ideally you should do everything possible with the material before you get time with your teacher and get answers to questions. There is one downside to this approach though, and it's a big one. If you are in a group class situation, there is a near 100% chance that the majority of your classmates will not do the necessary preparation. Therefore, you are forced to cater to the lowest common denominator. I think since most s
    1 point
  14. This is very interesting, almost a "flipped classroom" approach... I think this assumption is perhaps built into the HSK standard course textbooks, at least from Level 4 upwards. Each chapter starts by quizzing you on what you know of this chapters' vocabulary, which is why I came to the conclusion you need to pre-learn for the vocab for each chapter before you start studying it with your teacher. Is this perhaps a common model in teaching in China?
    1 point
  15. +1 for ZhongWen on Chrome. It has some useful features like: press 'g' to go to an explanation in Chinese Grammar Wiki (for certain words) press alt + 1..7 to look up in one of 7 different online dictionaries
    1 point
  16. Just in case anyone wanted to know TPR is Total Physical response. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Total_physical_response
    1 point
  17. Ten years on and off with loads of long breaks of no studying at all. In the beginning I did loads of the (free) ChinesePod. Then I guess I floundered a with native content for a long time, not really sure of where to find the right stuff. Working through 家有儿女, some random textbooks, LinQ's content, and I can't remember what else, I sort of brute forced through that phase with the help of Anki and rote vocab learning. Recently I've gotten to a point where I'm reading news and novels without too much hassle so it's made mass input a lot more fun. I've been reading throu
    1 point
  18. This is a great resource!
    1 point
  19. Not heard it before though I expect it parses 斩白 then 水 as one meaning of the latter is gratuity etc, see definition 5 here: https://www.zdic.net/hans/水 I can imagine 斩白 as some euphemism for allowing access to one's pure person/flesh but that's a complete guess to be honest; doubt it's an allusion to the founder of the Han killing the white snake which is 斩白蛇 and the other place I've seen that combination of characters. That 开刀 suggested as a synonym looks like it might work in a similar way re. access.
    1 point
  20. Amy, The only way to learn Japanese 'kanji" is to take them one step at a time. Feel free to ask any question on kanji and I will help you with it. I read the article you posted, a link to Italki. Did you understand what they said about 本? The link has one big mistake concerning 本. Did you find the mistake? Do you have any questions about the various readings for 本?
    1 point
  21. I wish the following list of teaching methods that have been very effective in teaching foreign languages (my personal experience is only with Chinese, Italian, and English), together with a lot of enthusiasm, speed, vigor, volume, clearness, joy, smiles, gestures, praise, praise, and praise, can help you and your tutor too. It is suggested to use around 4 different methods each hour. English: Communicative approach (standard) Communicative approach (15 seconds) Communicative approach (using pictures) Educational exercise (balloons) Rassias meth
    1 point
  22. Thanks, Shelley. I remember you and I both moaning over how Perapera stopped working with Firefox several years ago. I have just now installed Zhongwen and look forward to using it. One feature of which I was not aware was that it will store a list of words that you looked up. Very useful. Will let me review and learn words over which I frequently stumble.
    1 point
  23. When I was focusing on Japanese (before I ever started to learn Chinese), I used wanikani.com to learn Kanji. I liked it and happily subscribed for a year. It's very mnemonic-based, and at the time it worked for me... up to about about 100 Kanji. Now I have a much better understanding of Chinese Hanzi, I'm slightly wary of going back to this mnemonic-based approach... I don't use this method for Hanzi but rather focus on understanding sound components and meaning components. Obviously I have a lot of new learning to do, since Japanese uses traditional characters or vari
    1 point
  24. To clarify, my original comment was intended to emphasize that learning the basics of handwriting is useful for most learners, but learning handwriting to an advanced level isn't. If you have a specific reason to learn it (e.g. taking exams that require it) or you simply value it as a skill or art form for its own sake, by all means learn it! Just don't feel that you're forced to otherwise. By my definition of functional literacy, you can be considered literate if you can read and write with the aid of a computer or smartphone. Requiring handwriting seems like an arbitr
    1 point
  25. The point that muscle memory helps you to recall characters is very relevant... but for me, I just found it slowed down my learning too much. Like others have mentioned, I hardly ever write in my mother tongue using a pen any more. So it doesn't seem worthwhile spending so much extra time on something like stroke order when I could be learning to write using pinyin IMEs instead, and making better use of my time in reading, speaking and listening. For me, understanding "how characters work" is about sound components, meaning components and composition rather than how yo
    1 point
  26. Everyone remembers that point in their Chinese learning journey when they discovered Pleco and decided to contact the developer to ask about their inspiration for creating a dictionary app. And then once they replied, you were so inpired you created new accounts on a number of platforms you previously had no interest in so that you could share the message about this fantastic new app with as many people as possible. Now that you've done that, should you participate in any of the other discussions on the forum, since you are a learner, and there are lots of interesting discussions o
    1 point
  27. Well... maybe 3 languages at once! 🙈 I started this thread because I thought there must be a strong synergy between learning Japanese and Chinese side-by-side. I teach Chinese college students, many of whom choose to learn Japanese, and I envy the fact that they can look at a character and "know" (hopefully) the meaning, even if they don't remember the on'yomi or kun'yomi pronunciations. My current plan is to go for JLPT N5 in December 2021, just as a simple first goal, meanwhile working on HSK 5 which I'll probably do in February 2022, or maybe just before Spring Fes
    1 point
  28. Recently I started looking for an app that I can use on iOS to play audio files from textbook CDs, Glossika etc. My requirements: mandatory separate folder to store the files, I don't want to have to go through the music library since it just doesn't work well for random audio files (could also just be my personal preference, I've never liked itunes) some extended play controls, at least a button to jump a few seconds backwards nice to have audio bookmarks speed adjustment AB repeat unrealis
    1 point
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