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  1. jiaojiao87

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Showing content with the highest reputation on 06/10/2021 in all areas

  1. I started studying Chinese as a hobby 4 years ago when I turned 30. As someone who lives in the US, is married and has a full time job completely unrelated to languages, I had always mentally toyed around with the idea of taking a "sabbatical" for a year and studying in China for a few months...although never in a serious way. Last December, I randomly decided to see if I could take advantage of the fact that covid was making a lot of Universities and programs rethink about having remote offerings, and found Tsinghua University's IUP program. I attended class from January through
    4 points
  2. I was also inspired by @Jan Finster to go through all of the TCB's HSK 1 content. I've been doing it for a few weeks now, and I've got ~480 articles in my "read" status (that does include Blogs, but probably less than 50 of them). I have ~460 left to go before I'm up to date with all HSK 1, but to be honest I've lost interest in it now, and am finding it hard to motivate myself to stick to a daily schedule. My method was to try to tackle between 1-2 month's worth of articles per day (depending on how much time I had), which was usually about 20 articles. At first (once they added t
    4 points
  3. Hey Jan, thanks for this. I took your posts as inspiration follow you on your journey. I started with the HSK 1 articles a few days ago - i listen to the article first (mostly 2 times) and then listen to it once more with reading the text in parallel. Lets see where it brings me 🙂 Vielen Dank!
    3 points
  4. So, did you end up taking a "sabbatical" (voluntarily or due to COVID) or did you squeeze in the program in your spare time and continued working? The latter would sound complicated (scheduling) and exhausting.
    3 points
  5. Sure! It's actually two 50-minute classes. Each 50-minute class is with a different teacher. After 8 weeks, the teachers and learning material were changed, and I had 2 new teachers and new material in the same format. Both teachers focused on different aspects of the material; for example, one might focus on grammar constructs and understanding of the material, and the other on proper vocabulary usage and pronunciation. The teachers were very friendly, and I enjoyed the classes. However, they certainly are intense...although not necessarily more than the in-person
    3 points
  6. No sabbatical, haha. I got off work at 5, and had class until 7. I then took a break for dinner and to relax a bit, and did homework from 9 to 11ish. Yeah, sounds pretty ridiculous when I type it out, but since I enjoy studying and attending classes it wasn't that bad...
    2 points
  7. I would also not be too focussed on taking the most efficient way for learning kanji. Learn them as they come up, use Chinese readings (where possible) as a memory aid and do not neglect the rest. For me, the most difficult part was everything that is not written in kanji, i.e. grammar, including verb forms, and entire words written in hiragana (although a kanji would exist - this is done quite frequently in texts for children, but also in other texts so as not to overburden a sentence with kanji) . Not that these things are immensely difficult, but I tended to not really internalise them and
    2 points
  8. They preferred using something called "Voov" - I hadn't heard of it before, but seems like some Chinese meeting software. It was fine, but primitive, no issues really. They were flexible though, and could also use Zoom, Skype, or WeChat if I cared - with WeChat not being preferred because they can't share screen. My only advice is have a good mic and/or headset, and be in a quiet environment. People using crappy mics in meetings or classes creates frustration and makes the experience wear on you a lot more. Plus, if they can't hear you clearly, they can't correct you. I person
    2 points
  9. I didn't scan any QR codes — the first time I got my jab the HR department at my college arranged it, and I went along with several colleagues. The second time (last week) was a bit more random and I went alone, found there were about 300 people outside the clinic (2 hour waiting time, in 29°C), gave up and went home. I was later persuaded to go back and try again later that day (long story — basically last chance to get #2 before they switched to another manufacturer). Maybe it's best if you PM me for more details?
    1 point
  10. @arreke — why can't you be vaccinated in Hangzhou (if thats where you currently are)...? I've had both my Sinovac vaccinations now in Hangzhou (Gongshu Qu), within the last 5 weeks.
    1 point
  11. I am glad you are on board. Quite a few people contacted me and are trying it out. Please keep us posted
    1 point
  12. The pitch accent is also heavily dependent on where the speaker is from. I never payed attention to it and instead just picked it up listening to people talk but I can see how it would make a lot of sense for Chinese material to include it while material in English might even argue that it doesn't matter. Not paying attention to pitch accent also has never affected anyone's understanding of my speech even though I hear for example that the pitch accent is different for the words for bridge and chopsticks. Adding the polite "o" in front of the word for chopsticks (this i
    1 point
  13. There's really nothing systematic that helps in translating between Chinese and Japanese readings. Sometimes knowing the Ch reading may work as an approximate mnemonic device, but Japanese phonemes don't map consistently, and having a long or short -u-, or an -o- instead of an -u-, is a big deal. Compared to when I started, at least now you can input a character on a Japanese dictionary using the Chinese pinyin input on your phone. It occasionally fails (when the character variants are different) but it's often a time saver. A difference I noticed between Chinese and En
    1 point
  14. Probably depends on how good your imagination is. For me I would say that knowing the Japanese pronunciation has maybe helped with say 10% of the Hanzi. And the problem with Japanese is that there are usually multiple Kun yomi as well and they can be quite different to each other too. You can find some examples by considering the list here and copying the Japanese words to Google Translate for example to hear how they are pronounced. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Chinese–Japanese_false_friends
    1 point
  15. Could you say a bit more about the remote learning experience? How did you find being on a one-on-one call for two hours? Sounds a bit intense. I’ve never really been able to imagine it being that enjoyable to learn through video conferencing. Certainly, my experience from the other end has put me off it quite a lot. Did you ever have any technical issues? Poor quality sound, time-lag, etc.
    1 point
  16. I don't think so. Wish it were. Most of the classes I've taken have approximately followed the pattern of: 1. Brief preview of today's new material 2. Tackle the process of learning the new material, with explanation, discussion, exercises and practice. 3. Brief summary/review of what was learned, with homework designed to re-enforce the new material. I have usually urged and exhorted my teachers to spend time at the very beginning of each session reviewing key parts of what went before. That helped me a lot, making it less likely that things would just go in one ear
    1 point
  17. Going to put that on a t-shirt. I suspect organising that much tuition, in that short a space of time, would be pretty challenging. I don't think I'd want to do it all with one tutor (and would they want to do it with me), but then you have to coordinate across classes... I understand the price concerns, but I can see advantages to just having it all sorted out. There's an option 4: It's really easy that way.
    1 point
  18. I've had a few replies from the UK Confucius Institutes I emailed, and to summarise: Yes, Hanban is gone and CIEF/CLEC is now managing the centres CLEC will be "less involved [than Hanban was] with individual CI affairs, with many of the strategic and operational decisions left to the institutional level between the host and Chinese partner institutions." None of the UK CIs are expecting to close (unlike the situation in the US for example) Perhaps most significantly: None of the 5 who replied currently know anything about the format or organisation of the new
    1 point
  19. My understanding is for all extents and purposes , it is just a name change and won't alter how the front end of the CI works! Here's hoping the CI's stay in the UK for a long time! I feel they only get bad PR in a handful of countries. Predominantly from a global perspective they are welcomed!
    1 point
  20. Foreigners in Shanghai and Beijing are now being officially offered COVID jabs (Chinese vaccines only), at around 100 RMB a time. How Foreigners in Beijing Can Get Vaccinated: Step-by-Step https://mp.weixin.qq.com/s/5b9zTVY5UYySg0NDIqfgog Covid Vaccination Registration Now Open, Spaces Filling Up Quickly. https://www.smartshanghai.com/articles/activities/covid-vaccination-registration-now-open-spaces-filling-up-qr-code-inside update: According to the comments section on this Expat Focus post, foreigners have also been getting vaccinated in Wuhan, K
    1 point
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